Cultural Heritage of Pakistan

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In a major discovery, a team of experts announced unearthing a pot full of copper coins from the archaeological site, Mohenjo Daro, which they saw as the first remarkable discovery of artefacts at the 5,000-year-old city remains after 93 years.

Sources disclosed that a group of labourers were excavating a collapsed wall when they came across a pot full of ancient copper coins in the ancient city.

Director of Archaeology Mohenjodaro, Dr Syed Shakir Shah, who led the team comprising archaeological conservator Ghulam Shabir Joyo, had confirmed that the staff busy with preservation work had stumbled upon the pot of coins on Wednesday.

Sources said that the jar of coins weighing about five and a half kilogram was later shifted to the soil testing laboratory.

Tourists used to visit the 26th century B.C. Mohenjo Daro near Larkana in Sindh, one of the largest cities in of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization.

Mohenjo-daro.jpg


Source: ARY

 
Pakistan has numerous ancient and historic sites that connect us to our history, preserving our culture and traditions for generations. The country holds a wealth of ancient heritage spanning centuries.
 
Someone better guard those coins before the Sharif Family finds them.
 
The entire North India including Pakistan are same people with common origin. They are just divided by religion.
 
For centuries, Pakistan's Wakhi shepherdesses have trekked to remote mountain pastures to graze their flocks. The income they generated has been pivotal in transforming their community, helping to pay for healthcare, education and the first road out of their valley. As their way of life dies out, BBC 100 Women joined them on one of their last trips to the pastures.

Our journey up to the Pamir pastures is treacherous. The steep mountain trails wind and twist - one wrong step and you are gone.

The women whistle and holler at the sheep, goats and yaks to stop them straying from the narrow paths and falling down the mountainside.

"There used to be a lot more cattle than now," says Bano, who is in her late 70s. "The animals would jump here and there and run away. Some would come back and some of them wouldn't."

In years gone by, every summer dozens of Wakhi shepherdesses would make this trek through the rugged Karakoram mountains of north-east Pakistan. Carrying their young children on their backs, they would leave the men at home to farm in the Shimshal valley below.

Today, there are only seven of the shepherdesses left.

We walk for eight hours a day through rain, snow and scorching heat. The journey that used to take the women three days takes us five. The elderly shepherdesses are always way ahead of the rest of us as we acclimatise to the altitude.

The threat of landslides is ever present and the thud of the sheep's hooves vibrates through the ground, bringing rocks and dust crashing down.

It was even harder in the past, before the shepherdesses had thermal jackets and walking shoes.

"We used to wear simple robes. We would be shoeless, and walk into the ice like that," says 88-year-old Annar.

Afroze, who is now 67, remembers becoming the first woman in the valley to get a pair of shoes.

"My brother gave me two pairs when I got married," she says. "People used to come just to see them. They would often borrow them and my dress for weddings."

When we finally reach Pamir, almost 5,000m (16,000ft) above sea level, the lush green pastures unfold and streams of shimmering glacial water carve their way through the landscape, surrounded by rugged snow-capped peaks.

"We've walked these lands alongside our mothers and grandmothers. Like us, they were shepherdesses, churning butter, and making yogurt," says Annar, as the women sing and dance.

A cluster of 60 stone houses, abandoned and locked up, hint at a vanishing lifestyle.

As the eldest shepherdess, Annar kisses the door of one of the ranches, says a prayer and steps inside carrying a hotplate with burning leaves.

"Our elders taught us to use the spandur plant. They told us to always keep it near, as it keeps trouble away," she says as she makes sure the smoke touches every animal.

In the past, to ward off wolves and leopards, they slept on rooftops, even in the harshest weather, made traps and burned fires.

"It was pitch black at night," says Annar, "We had no light or torch and we wouldn't even see what we had lost until morning."

There were personal hardships too. There were no doctors or healthcare facilities in the mountains and she recalls how one summer they buried 12 children in the pastures. Her son and daughter were among them.

"I was empty-handed, just like this," she sighs, opening her clenched fists, still feeling the pain from almost 60 years ago.

Over the years, the shepherdesses became successful businesswomen. "We would collect milk from the animals to make yoghurt and dairy products. We sheared the sheep and made things to take to the village," says Bano.

The Wakhi community relied on barter and in return for their goods people would build the women huts and houses. Afroze earned enough to build two homes, one in Shimshal and another further away in Gilgit, the nearest city.

"I've gained a lot from this place," she says proudly. "It paid for my children's weddings. It paid for their education."

The combination of the women's shepherding and the men's farming brought a turning point for the whole community, which was disconnected from the rest of the world until the early 2000s. They helped fund the only road out of the Shimshal valley, linking the village to the Karakoram highway which runs between Pakistan and China.

Journeys that used to take days were reduced to hours and life was transformed. There was better access to healthcare and education and new ideas flooded in.

Bano's son, Wazir, leads a very different life now. He runs a tourist company organising trekking, mountaineering and cultural tours.

"Our priorities changed when the new road opened," he says. "That's when I started my business."

Fazila, who is 24, owns the first guest house in Shimshal valley, which her father built before he passed away. Her mother was a shepherdess, although her failing health meant she couldn't go to the pastures this year.

"Our mothers encouraged us to focus on our studies rather than shepherding. They told us not to endure the same hardships that they did," she explains. "We have the freedom to do what we wish. If I hadn't pursued my education, I'd be living the same hard life as they did. The cycle would have continued."

As he drives his jeep through the rugged mountains, Wazir agrees: "Because of our mothers we have doctors, engineers and many other professionals."

Sitting together sharing memories, the elderly shepherdesses are happy to see their children doing well, but there is a tinge of sadness that the trips to the Pamir pastures are no longer viable.

"Shepherding is more than a job. We feel a strong bond to Pamir. It is beautiful like a flower. It is our treasure," says Afroze.

And as Annar walks slowly to the graveyard where she buried her children, her eyes fill with tears.

"I want to die in Pamir so I can be buried next to my children," she says. "When I return to the pastures, I'm returning to them."

Source: BBC

 
It's a powerful reminder of the intricate balance between tradition and progress. The sacrifices these women made for their community's well-being are truly commendable.
 
Modern Pakistan region was the heart of the Indus Valley Civilization. This region has so much history and there is so much to be explored but modern Pakistanis know very little of the pre-Islamic history of this region because we have alienated ourselves from our past and defined our identity and culture with religion.

Our history starts with Arab invaders looting and plundering the region and forcing people to convert. This hasn’t worked well because we got rejected by the Arabs and then we decided to become Turks but they rejected us too.

This had led to our identity crisis. At the global level, Pakistan has failed to distinguish itself from Indian culture. For example, Pakistani cuisine is seen as Indian cuisine and all Pakistani restaurants in the West market themselves as Pakistani and Indian restaurants and serve signature Indian dishes as well to do business, knowing that if they don’t do that they will fail to attract customers.
 
Sindh's Caretaker Minister for Culture and Antiquities Dr Junaid Ali Shah has announced the recovery of six stolen cannons from Kot Diji Fort.

The minister personally visited Kot Diji in Khairpur to inspect and gather details about the fort. During the visit, he inspected two cannons that have been reinstalled in the Kot Diji Fort. Speaking to the media, Dr Shah revealed that out of the six recovered cannons, two have already been reinstated within the fort, while the locations of the remaining four have been identified.

Reiterating his commitment to preserving the historical significance of Kot Diji Fort, Dr Shah assured that all antiquities belonging to the fort would be returned, enhancing the overall historical beauty of the site. In a move to promote cultural awareness, the minister announced the waiver of entry fees for students visiting the heritage sites and museums across Sindh

Dr Shah underlined the need for exposing the youth to their cultural heritage, highlighting the responsibility of Sindh's youth in carrying forward the region's rich history. He stressed the importance of educating the youth about heritage sites, announcing plans for an information and facilitation counter at Kot Diji Fort to assist and create awareness for future tourists.

Adding to the positive developments, Dr Shah shared that the construction of a magnificent museum at Kot Diji Fort has been completed, with plans for inauguration in mid-January.

Moreover, he mentioned intentions to communicate with local governments, advocating for improved access to heritage sites. This includes not only road repairs but also the installation of information boards to enhance the overall experience for visitors.

Source: Express Tribune

 
Heritages are precious assets of any nation. The Pakistani government should take stricter measures to protect our heritage.
 
Modern Pakistan region was the heart of the Indus Valley Civilization. This region has so much history and there is so much to be explored but modern Pakistanis know very little of the pre-Islamic history of this region because we have alienated ourselves from our past and defined our identity and culture with religion.

Our history starts with Arab invaders looting and plundering the region and forcing people to convert. This hasn’t worked well because we got rejected by the Arabs and then we decided to become Turks but they rejected us too.

This had led to our identity crisis. At the global level, Pakistan has failed to distinguish itself from Indian culture. For example, Pakistani cuisine is seen as Indian cuisine and all Pakistani restaurants in the West market themselves as Pakistani and Indian restaurants and serve signature Indian dishes as well to do business, knowing that if they don’t do that they will fail to attract customers.

Did you revert to your cultural heritage religion yet? The one before Arabs forced your ancestors to convert ( in your own words).
 
pakistan has an identity crisis, half the people think they are descended from arabs, some from persians, some from turks, when you have no idea of your identity what value will you attach to the cultural assets of a prehistory you dont even want to own.

the indus valley has been settled for thousands of years, the civilisations of mohanjadaro and harrapa, the historical epicentre of what is now Pakistan has always had a distinct and unique character owing to its position at the crossroads of persian and indian cultural influences, yet there has been no attempt to even create a narrative history of Pakistan beyond coopting the histories of people we had nothing to do with.

this leaves you open to indians controlling the narrative on our background, yes punjabis and sindhis are north indian but our ancestors had little in common with the languages or cultures of eastern or southern india, and pathans and balochis are not an indian ethnicity, who have virtually nothing in common with the majority of the people of india.

rather than explore, formalise and promote our unique cultural and historical background we have pseudo intellectuals claiming that "we" conquered the iberian peninsula, or "we" invented algebra, yet those who had working sanitation and planned towns 4000 years ago were somehow, others, its embarrassing, and a damning indictment of the stunted development of an "intellectual" class.
 
Pakistan issues visas to Indian Hindu pilgrims for Katas Raj visit

The Pakistan High Commission in New Delhi has issued 62 visas to a group of Indian Hindu pilgrims, allowing them to visit the historic Shree Katas Raj Temples, also known as Qila Katas, situated in the Chakwal district of Punjab. The pilgrimage is scheduled to take place from 19th to 25th December.

In a press release issued on Monday, Charge d’ Affaires Aizaz Khan expressed his heartfelt wishes to the pilgrims, extending hopes for a safe journey and a memorable stay in Pakistan.

The issuance of these pilgrimage visas falls under the framework of the Pakistan-India Protocol on Visits to Religious Shrines established in 1974. This bilateral agreement has facilitated the annual pilgrimage of thousands of Sikh and Hindu devotees from India, allowing them to participate in various religious festivals and occasions hosted in Pakistan.

Earlier this month, Pakistan granted 104 visas to Indian Hindu pilgrims to participate in the 315th birth anniversary celebrations of Shiv Avtari Satguru Sant Shadaram Sahib at the Shadani Darbar Hayat Pitafi in Sindh. The 300-year old temple is a sacred place for Hindu devotees from across the globe. The Shadani Darbar was founded in 1786 by Sant Shadaram Sahib, who was born in Lahore in 1708.

The visit to Shree Katas Raj Temples holds great significance for the Hindu community, as these temples are revered for their historical and cultural importance. The pilgrimage reflects the commitment of both nations to honour and preserve cultural heritage and religious tradition.

Pakistan's initiative to grant visas to Indian Hindu pilgrims aligns with the objective of facilitating the visits to religious shrines and promoting the interfa
ith harmony.

Source: Express Tribune

 
Love this interfaith harmony, and all people are welcome to Pakistan to experience our cultural heritage.
 
Did you revert to your cultural heritage religion yet? The one before Arabs forced your ancestors to convert ( in your own words).
It would be great if everyone connects strongly to their roots. Pakistan and Afghanistan has only been under Islam for a few centuries. But they have been Buddhist and Hindu for close to 1500 years.
 
It would be great if everyone connects strongly to their roots. Pakistan and Afghanistan has only been under Islam for a few centuries. But they have been Buddhist and Hindu for close to 1500 years.

Pakistan still shares many cultural traits with Bharat, although probably more in sync with north India than south. I don't think you will get much change out of Afghanistan, although would be interesting to see a delegation from Bharat attempt to reintroduce Hinduism to the nation.
 
Pakistan still shares many cultural traits with Bharat, although probably more in sync with north India than south. I don't think you will get much change out of Afghanistan, although would be interesting to see a delegation from Bharat attempt to reintroduce Hinduism to the nation.
If they don't want to comeback alive.
 
The Ellum Winter Festival, a two-day extravaganza, concluded after Corps Commander Peshawar Lieutenant General Hassan Azhar Hayat presided over the closing ceremony, a statement said on Sunday

IGFC North Major General Noor Wali Khan, district administration, security forces officials and a diverse array of guests joined in the festivities.

The festival saw 110 bikes and 60 jeeps from across Pakistan converge in Buner, marking the first-ever winter festival in the area. A warm welcome awaited participants as jeeps and bikes journeyed from Punjab to Buner.

The closing ceremony featured paragliding stunts that garnered special applause from the audience.

The Frontier Corps Martial Dance Party showcased local dances, complemented by local artists singing traditional songs. Cultural stalls also adorned the festival grounds.

Lieutenant General Hassan Azhar Hayat honoured jeep drivers and bikers with medals and prizes.

Participants expressed gratitude to the Pakistan Army for organising the event, added the statement.

Source: Express Tribune

 
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