Matthew Wade - Outstanding!

omairsiddiqui

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Few days ago, Michael Clarke said he would like to have Haddin back as soon as possible. Matthew Wade, fierce competitor that he is, does not want to give his Test place away.

So he goes and scores a magnificent hundred.

This guy is one to keep an eye on.

There's no doubt that the Australian cricketing system has some of the most "prepared" cricketers in the world.

Australias-Matthew-Wade-i-007.jpg
 
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It is pretty simple domestic theory- only 5 teams means only the best make it & they always have to fight for their spots. Stronger competition.

That also leaves better players down at club level, meaning even club cricket is very strong and tough cricket, again better preparing players from day 1.

The Pakistan system with 400 teams seems like a basket case to me.
 
He did get quite a few chances due to Windies patetic fieliding but I do agree, he surely got Haddin off his back for a while. He is a good fighting cricketer, on the other hand, Haddin IMHO routinely misses the plot, and has horrendous brain farts in critical situation...
 
Well done on the maiden test century.

Now when do Cricket Australia dump him to bring back Haddin - :kami .
 
Clarke might want Haddin but I think Wade has sewn up that spot now. Clarke is not the sole selector.

Haddin has been mediocre for a year or two now.
 
he is simply a better all round cricketer. Haddins was just a slogger with added quality of sledging

Looking very good in all 3 forms now
 
The question what is Haddin going to do now? Wade has potentially sealed his place after playing that match winning knock? a knock Haddin can only dream of given his recent horrible form with the bat. Haddin retired from limited overs cricket, i believe his days are over for the longer version too. Good riddance?
 
Given Adam Gilchrist's legacy, Haddin had some big shoes to fill. He just hasn't been good enough to fill that role, but it seems like Wade is. It's too early to say though.
 
It is pretty simple domestic theory- only 5 teams means only the best make it & they always have to fight for their spots. Stronger competition.

That also leaves better players down at club level, meaning even club cricket is very strong and tough cricket, again better preparing players from day 1.

The Pakistan system with 400 teams seems like a basket case to me.
That theory would work only if your country had a population more than Karachi alone.
 
Haddin is rubbish anyway. He has a tendency to take wild swipes outside the off stump in critical situations. And he only averages around 30 I think.

Then again, let's not overestimate Wade. The Windies have a poor attack and terrible fielders to go with it. If anything, this says more about how out of form the Aussie top order is.
 
Haddin is too loose a stroke player. He flashes at the ball hard and early, and often when we need him to knuckle down and grind it out.

The Aussie team is a little weaker than previous years, so we need everyone to be steady contributors.

Wade for me by a mile.
 
time for haddin to move on, though i have feeling Left Handed Wade will meet his worst Nightmare soon :hafeez. After wade normally opens the batting in limited overs
 
Few days ago, Michael Clarke said he would like to have Haddin back as soon as possible. Matthew Wade, fierce competitor that he is, does not want to give his Test place away.

So he goes and scores a magnificent hundred.

This guy is one to keep an eye on.

There's no doubt that the Australian cricketing system has some of the most "prepared" cricketers in the world.

Australias-Matthew-Wade-i-007.jpg

That was a bit of a subtle motivation statement from Pup. He's getting good at this.
 
I dont rate Wade that highly but he is far better than Haddin with both gloves and bat.
 
Wade looks like slightly better then Haddin, but hasnt convinced me hes the longterm answer in tests. I wonder why tim paine keeps getting over looked?
 
Paine is injured AJ, broke his finger very badly and hasnt played since, and may not play again.

No doubt he was the preferred replacement, which is why they stuck with Haddin for so long.
 
Paine is injured AJ, broke his finger very badly and hasnt played since, and may not play again.

No doubt he was the preferred replacement, which is why they stuck with Haddin for so long.

He was wasted in some random Idiotic promotional t20 game the Australian Cricketers' Association All-stars game. Each time i see Australia play i cant help but feel sorry for Paine, he was also given the vice captaincy under Clarke so big loss.
 
Paine is injured AJ, broke his finger very badly and hasnt played since, and may not play again.

No doubt he was the preferred replacement, which is why they stuck with Haddin for so long.

That's very sad to hear about Paine, hope it's not the end of him.
 
Paine is injured AJ, broke his finger very badly and hasnt played since, and may not play again.

No doubt he was the preferred replacement, which is why they stuck with Haddin for so long.

Hope he recovers and gets to play for Australia again. Having haddin back in side would be a poor option for the Aussies.
 
Haddin is a lucky man. First Tim Paine, and now Matt Wade will be making way for him to return to the side. Although he seems to be the worst option out of that trio.
 
what an hundred today just classic under pressure batting earned respect all over the world and yes way way batter batsman then domestic bully Lynn and Mitchell "can't play spin" marsh
 
This is just how Australia operates. If their top order fails, the lower order magically summons the ability to get the job done and put up a great total. They've been doing this for decades.
 
Bump! He is in crazy good form. I think he will be a key player for the Aussies in Ashes.
 
Bump! He is in crazy good form. I think he will be a key player for the Aussies in Ashes.

Wade is miles better than Paine. Not sure why Aussies persist with Paine.

Carey should be the LOI keeper and Wade should be the Test keeper.
 
Finally getting the chance he has earned. He has done well mostly as a specialist batter. I have a feeling he will start in the first test.
 
Australia should drop Paine, give him the gloves, bring in Handscomb and make Lyon captain.
 
Australia should drop Paine, give him the gloves, bring in Handscomb and make Lyon captain.

Has Lyon ever captained a side? Is a smart guy but not sure if he is a leader as well.

It's like many deluded Pakistanis saying Yasir should be Pak's Test skipper.
 
Has Lyon ever captained a side? Is a smart guy but not sure if he is a leader as well.

It's like many deluded Pakistanis saying Yasir should be Pak's Test skipper.

Australia don’t have options.

They should give the captaincy back to Smith, but unless they take a U-turn, it is not going to happen.

What are the other options? Warner? No chance because of his behavior.

Khawaja and Bancroft are not permanent members and Head is too new. Wade is only making his comeback and none of the pacers are options because of the rotation policy.

Unless they take a left-field decision and give the captaincy to someone like Head or Carey, Lyon seems like the only natural choice.

He is experienced, plays every Test and still has 4-5 years left in the tank. The problem with Yasir is that he is not an all-conditions spinner like Lyon.
 
[MENTION=131701]Mamoon[/MENTION]

What do you think about Alex Carey.

I think he is a quality prospect for Australia.
 
[MENTION=131701]Mamoon[/MENTION]

What do you think about Alex Carey.

I think he is a quality prospect for Australia.

Looks really good. I wonder where he would be today had he not wasted time with AFL.
 
Australia should drop Paine, give him the gloves, bring in Handscomb and make Lyon captain.

Wade success in domestic cricket has been without the gloves.

Carey can take Paines place and Smith should be made captain when his captaincy ban expires in 2020.

I think he will captain Australia again.
 
Wade has been performing in domestic cricket for a while and he has taken this form to international level.

A lesson for us. Back domestic performers if there is no special talent in the wings.
 
Wade showed today why he should be the keeper-batsman and not Paine.

Wade should be the permanent Test keeper.
 
Well played.

He was under pressure to do well and he has bought himself some time.
 
Played great after the 100 milestone, he seemed to forget that he should stay there.

Good innings but should have been more careful in the end.
 
Not been at his best with the bat in this series, but he is a better option than Paine, with Smith back as skipper.
 
Paine has made arguably the worst decision in cricketing history right along with Nasser in Gabba 03’ and Ponting at Edgbaston 05’.

Inept captain, batsman, and wicketkeeper.
 
Wade should not be Keeper. He should stay in the team as a batsman though. He himself admit that he is doing much better with the bat without the responsibility of Keeping. Trying out Alex Carey for the Keeper batsman wouldn't be a bad option though, can't be worse than Paine.
 
Wade should be the keeper. He can bat better.

Alex Carey can be given a chance also.

Wade was horrible as a keeper. He should be there as a middle order bat. Paine is not going anywhere especially since he retained the Ashes in England which Ponting, and Clarke could not do. He is deeply flawed as a captain and batsman but he should get the home series.
 
Wade was horrible as a keeper. He should be there as a middle order bat. Paine is not going anywhere especially since he retained the Ashes in England which Ponting, and Clarke could not do. He is deeply flawed as a captain and batsman but he should get the home series.
Paine did jack all as Captain apart from 4th Test.

In the first two tests Smith was effectively captaining on the field and deciding on field settings
 
Cricket Australia: Matthew Wade returns from Ashes unsure over Test spot vs Pakistan and New Zealand

Matthew Wade believes his Ashes showing with the bat is enough to secure a middle-order Test spot for the start of the cricket summer.
But he concedes there are no selection guarantees.

The Tasmanian hit two centuries and finished as Australia’s third-highest run scorer in a series where they retained the urn on English soil. The punctuation mark was a fighting second-innings 117 in the final-Test loss at The Oval.

“I’d like to think my performances over those five Tests will have me in the first Test, but you never know,” Wade told reporters after landing in Hobart on Thursday.

Australia faces selection headaches at the top of the order after poor Ashes returns from openers David Warner, Cameron Bancroft and Marcus Harris.

The rest of the top six is also not set in stone, with Travis Head dropped for Mitch Marsh in the final Test and Marnus Labuschagne leapfrogging Usman Khawaja at No.3.

There are 12 Sheffield Shield matches before Australia play Pakistan in the summer’s first Test on November 21 at the Gabba.

Wade knows selection frustration better than most, having banged down the door with first-class runs to make his Test comeback as a specialist bat.

“You never feel 100 per cent safe,” the 31-year-old said of his Australian spot.

“Every time I play a game for Australia I feel like I’m playing for my spot. There’ll be plenty of press around the first few Shield games.

“I got the two hundreds, that’s what everyone will speak about but I thought ... the 30s I got in important times in the Leeds Test and the Manchester Test showed that under pressure I can stand up in the big moments.”

Wade has been rested for Tasmania’s one-day matches against Victoria and Western Australia next week but is expected to play after that.

He was quick to throw his support behind Test skipper Tim Paine, a day after all-rounder Mitch Marsh did the same.

Paine has come under fire for some questionable DRS calls and his choice to bowl first in The Oval match, which England won to level the series 2-2. “Ashes cricket can be a pressure cooker and I thought he handled it really well,” Wade said.

“Within the group, he’s got our full respect.”

https://www.foxsports.com.au/cricke...d/news-story/77ab8281629240c77a17a115cb1db006
 
Test batsman Matthew Wade says a few days off at home has him refreshed and ready to lead Tasmania in his return to the Marsh One-Day Cup.

Wade arrived back at home in Hobart following the Ashes last week and was rested from the Tigers’ opening two matches of the Marsh Cup against Western Australia and Victoria.

But the experienced wicketkeeper-batsman was on Thursday confirmed to captain Tasmania in their next two 50-over matches – both against South Australia in Adelaide next week.

Wade said a few days at home looking after his kids had allowed him to shake any lingering jetlag and has him ready to help Tasmania pick up their first win of the season.

"I feel pretty good now...I'm keen to get back and play," Wade said.

"Four or five days at home with two little ones getting over jetlag certainly gives you the desire to get out there and have another crack at it.

"I'm still hungry to play more cricket. I don't play it for individual success, I'm going to try and contribute for wins for Tassie."

Wade is expected to take the gloves for Tasmania for their next two Marsh Cup fixtures, after Ben McDermott kept wickets in the absence of the veteran for the early stages of the tournament.

While Wade is more than happy to take his spot behind the stumps when required, he said playing as a specialist batsman for Australia during the recent Ashes series had provided him with a different perspective on games.

"I really enjoyed just playing as a batter, it was certainly a different feeling finding myself at mid-off shining the ball and you can just switch off," Wade said.

"The game certainly doesn't feel as long and there are certain Tests you're always under pressure if batting or keeping and I certainly felt that during my first 20-odd games (when keeping) in Test cricket."

Wade was one of only two Australian batsmen to make a century during the Ashes tour, but the 31-year-old knows he needs to continue making runs at state level if he is to retain his spot for Test series against Pakistan and New Zealand this summer.

"There's a lot of media beat up about selection this time of year, I've been around long enough to know there'll be plenty going on but it doesn't worry me too much," he said.

"My focus is to go and play good cricket for Tassie and all will take care of itself."

Tasmania squad: Matthew Wade (C), George Bailey, Jackson Bird, Alex Doolan, Nathan Ellis, James Faulkner, Jarrod Freeman, Caleb Jewell, Ben McDermott, Riley Meredith, Gurinder Sandhu, Jordan Silk, Beau Webster

https://www.cricket.com.au/news/mat...stralia-ashes-pakistan-test-series/2019-09-26
 
Chris Lynn was stunned by the silence that preceded his T20 snubbing, but Matthew Wade says his communication with selectors was crystal clear.]

The 31-year-old said he was disappointed — like Lynn — to have been left out of Australia’s T20 squad to play three T20s each against Sri Lanka and Pakistan.

Unlike Lynn, however, Wade knew where he stood with selectors prior to the squad announcement and why they chose to leave him out.

Speaking to foxsports.com.au at Fox Cricket’s 2019-20 launch, Wade said: “I was lucky enough to be around the Australian team for the last three months so I’ve had communication with the selectors and the coach.

“I know exactly where I stand in all formats and I’m happy with that. I’ve just got to keep making runs.

“When you’re not getting picked it’s easy to look at a hundred different reasons but usually the reason is if you perform well enough you’ll get picked at some stage.”

Wade hasn’t played a T20I since September 2016 but was part of Australia’s Ashes squad and was therefore in closer contact with selectors. Lynn hasn’t played for his nation since November 2018.

Nonetheless, Lynn felt he was owed a phone call about the decision for him to be left out the squad.

“I don’t mind being dropped (but) to not make a phone call, that lack of communication is very poor,” Lynn said at Kayo’s summer of cricket launch on Tuesday. “And it has probably been poor for a number of years now in Australian cricket.

“There have been plenty of scenarios where blokes have found out online, it’s not that hard to pick up the phone and make a call.”

Lynn revealed on Macquarie Sports Radio on Thursday that he later met with chairman of selectors Trevor Hohns and “sorted it out”.

Former national selector Mark Waugh disagreed with Lynn’s initial point of view, insisting selectors don’t owe every player that misses out a call.

“I did read about (Lynn’s comments) ... what do they want? The selectors to ring every player in Australia?” he told reporters.

“He wasn’t actually in the last Australian T20 team, and if he was they would have spoken to him but he wasn’t.”

Waugh added: “Maybe players are a bit different these days, they want to get spoken to all the time.

“My advice to players was score runs and take wickets, and the rest will take care of itself.”

Along with D’Arcy Short, Lynn and Wade were the most glaring batting omissions from Australia’s T20 squad.

For those with aspirations of featuring in next year’s T20 World Cup, it’s a bad time to be on the squad’s outer. But Wade considers his hopes of playing at the tournament to be well and truly alive despite missing out this time around.

Speaking of his omission, he said: “Yeah, there’s always disappointment. You love to play for Australia.

“I’ve been speaking to selectors and the coach and I was there, or thereabouts.

“I was on standby for one of the batters, so I know that I’m close. I’ve just got to go out and do what I’ve been doing for a couple of years. Just keep putting runs in front of them and hope I get an opportunity.

“They’ll take an extended squad to the World Cup and the fact that I can wicketkeep will hopefully help me in that squad and fingers crossed I get a chance somewhere.”

Wade was among the nation’s best batsmen in last season’s Big Bash League, scoring 592 runs at 42.28. Only Short scored more runs in the competition with 637 at 53.08.

Australia’s first T20I of the summer is in Adelaide against Sri Lanka on Sunday (2.30pm).

https://www.foxsports.com.au/cricke...n/news-story/8f12c35bff2841613894645b1c7aa4f6
 
Australia should drop Paine, give him the gloves, bring in Handscomb and make Lyon captain.

Wade has said himself that playing as a non-keeper has helped lift his batting. A better option might be to give Carey a shot at test keeper and keep Wade as a specialist batsman.

Paine is turning out to be another Sarfaraz, a non-performing wicketkeeping batsman.

Carey can't do much worse as a batsman.
 
Matthew Wade reckons he’s proven it: he’s the man for Australia’s Test team.

Wade has reinforced his case to retain his Test spot with consecutive half-centuries while steering Tasmania to a Sheffield Shield win against Victoria.

The left-hander appears a lock for Australia’s first Test against Pakistan starting November 21 in Brisbane.

“I am confident I have done enough to play in the first Test match with what I achieved in England,” he told reporters after his 57 not out and top-score of 69 in the first innings against the Vics.

“But if it doesn’t happen, it doesn’t happen.

“I certainly haven’t put any extra pressure on myself at the start of the season to go out and prove that I’m the man to get picked.

“I feel I have done enough over a long period of time now.”

In the Ashes, Wade scored two centuries and averaged 33.70 - he averages 29.8 over 27 Tests.

SA skipper Travis Head scored 109 against a strong NSW bowling attack in Adelaide on Saturday and will soon play in Perth in what has effectively become a bat-off for a Test berth.

Head, who was dropped from the Test team after making 191 runs at 27.28 in four Ashes Tests, is among an Australia A team to play Pakistan in a tour game from November 11.

He, Usman Khawaja, Joe Burns and Marcus Harris will all press their claims for the Aussie A side - all while Wade ignores the selection debate.

“I don’t get consumed by what goes on at this time of the year before a Test series any more,” he said.

“There’s so much media speculation when this guy gets runs and this guy doesn’t. I don’t get too caught up in it now.”

Victorian opener Harris, the Test incumbent opening partner of David Warner, made 60 and 13 against Tasmania.

But his teammate Will Pucovski failed with scores of three and seven.

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/s...8/news-story/1da189c709acdba05e3a17f9d44a8dbd
 
Wade unfazed by unseen Pakistan quicks

The bowling attack that Pakistan takes into the upcoming Test series will be decidedly different to that which Matthew Wade encountered previously, but he won't be devoting much time to researching his new rivals.

Wade hasn't played Pakistan in Tests since they toured Australia three years ago, given he wasn't part of Tim Paine's outfit that travelled to the UAE for two matches in late 2018.

The left-hander, who remains unsure if he'll bat at number five or six in the Test line-up to be announced tomorrow, admits he used to closely study footage of opposition bowlers to glean how and where they might attack him at the crease.

But in his third iteration as a Test player, and fresh from a memorable century in his most recent outing – against Jofra Archer-led England in the final Ashes Test at The Oval – Wade prefers to focus on his own game rather than his opponents.

As such, he sees the 256-ball innings of 89 he compiled against South Australia in the Marsh Sheffield Shield meeting at Adelaide Oval today as time better spent than trawling through vision of Pakistan's new-look bowling line-up.

With the likes of Mohammad Amir and Wahab Riaz absent from the previous touring Test team, and Pakistan naming young quicks including Shaheen Afridi and teenage pair Musa Khan and Naseem Shah, the visitors carry an air of the unknown.

However, Wade will rely on intelligence shared at Australia's pre-Test team meeting in Brisbane and what he views from the dressing room once the series begins to formulate his plans against the Pakistan bowlers.

"Not as much as what I used to," Wade said when asked if he was a keen student of footage showing upcoming rivals.

"I just find that I've got things that I try and concentrate on rather than what the opposition are doing.

"If there's a bowler with a different action that I need to see, then I'll see a little bit maybe in the team meeting.

"But I don't go really deep into watching them too much, it's just more about what I need to do to get the best out of myself.

"The advantage of batting at five or six is that you get to watch a little bit of it before you go out there anyway.

"So you get to see enough, and I find that's plenty.

"Just speak to the guys that have faced them, and go from there.

"When I was younger I used to watch a lot of footage and it used to do my head in, watching (England's) James Anderson and those blokes knock a heap of left-handers over.

"You're almost beaten before you go out there, so I just concentrate on what I'm doing."

Similarly, Wade is not fussed that he was among the coterie of Test team 'locks' that were not named for the current Australia A team taking on Pakistan in a tour game at Perth Stadium.

While that would have afforded him a chance to re-acquaint himself with the pink ball that will be used in the second match of the Pakistan series – a day-night Test in Adelaide – he feels sufficiently comfortable with that format.

Certainly, his batting in the UK during the Australia A series that preceded the Ashes and the subsequent Tests – book-ended with his centuries in the first and final Tests – indicate he holds few fears against the swinging ball.

And even though the pink Kookaburra ball exhibits different characteristics to the Dukes ball used in the UK, his experience with the Dukes during recent Marsh Sheffield Shield seasons has his confidence high heading into day-night fixtures in Australia.

"That (Australia A) team was picked, I wasn't selected in it and I spoke to Cracker (Trevor Hohns, selection chair) and the reasons I'm not playing that game are fine with me," Wade said today.

"I've played enough with the ball moving.

"The Dukes have made a huge difference to first-class cricket, that ball swings a lot more than what we usually see in Australia.

"It's traditionally more sideways movement with the seam on the Kookaburra, so I feel like I've had a heap of work with the Dukes over here and then Dukes in England as well.

"So I feel comfortable to face the pink ball."

While Wade's uncharacteristically reserved innings at Adelaide Oval today was overshadowed by teammate Alex Doolan's even-more-cautious 170 not out (form 403 balls faced), his decision to declare Tasmania's first innings 145 runs behind has set up an intriguing final day.

SA made their intentions known in the 26 overs they faced prior to stumps on day three, during which rookie opener Henry Hunt (69 from 70 balls) and veteran Callum Ferguson (72 not out from 74) carried the Redbacks to 2-166, with an overall lead of 311.

Wade indicated his team would chase an outright win if the hosts set a realistic target, which might entail a declaration before play starts or after a handful of overs in the morning.

"Whatever we have to chase, we'll chase … but I think around 300 – if we get a good partnership we think we're a chance to chase it," Wade said.

"But it's hard to know, with ring fields and their spinners bowling, it could be challenging.

"If we get to a strong enough position, we can see if we go after them, or if we have to shut up shop."

https://www.cricket.com.au/news/mat...hts-live-scores-stream-wade-doolan/2019-11-13
 
True colour: Wade tickled pink when it comes to day-night Test

Adelaide: Australia’s colour-blind batsman Matthew Wade insists he has banished any concerns about facing cricket's pink ball and is ready to make up for missing out on a century in Brisbane.

Wade, 31, returns to the Adelaide Oval against Pakistan on Friday for the first time as a Test cricketer since 2016 when he made four in the day-night Test against South Africa. He was then a wicketkeeper-batsman and found judging the flight of the ball more difficult behind the stumps than batting.

Now a specialist batsman, he further eased any concerns about life at the crease when he took to the nets against Australia's fast bowlers in the difficult twilight period on Wednesday.

"It was more the perception of where the ball is going to be. When you are facing Starcy [Mitchell Starc] and those guys in the nets, you like to know where it is going to be," Wade said on Thursday.

"[Wednesday] night I was fine and the games that I have played ... it was a confidence thing. Four or five years ago, I wasn't sure how I was going to deal with it, with the bat, but now since we have played a game, it is not a problem at all. Thankfully, I will not be 'keeping - I will be at mid-off."

Wade can see the colour of the ball but the issue had been it took a fraction longer than normal to pick up its direction.

"I think I had most of the trouble when I was 'keeping. The further the back you get, and the distractions in between, with [advertising] boards and crowds, I think that is when I have had my biggest struggles with the pink ball," he said.

"When you bat, it's all right. Especially under lights, you see it really well. It's just that off red colour I tend to struggle with. Anything around that kind of area is not as clear as it could be.

"Batting seems to be fine but keeping is certainly a struggle. I think the boys in the slips will tell you the same thing - it is quite challenging. The further you come around [slips cordon] with the pink ball, the harder it can be to pick up, just with everything that goes on at the ground."

Wade was in excellent touch in Brisbane when he made 60 and was well on his way to what would have been his fifth Test century - and third in six Tests - until he opened the face of his blade in a bid to run spinner Haris Sohail to third man and was caught behind.

"I was a bit disappointed I didn't go on with it. It's nice to get out there and get a little bit of time in the first Test match. It makes you feel a little bit better coming here," he said.

"I think their [Pakistan] bowlers will be very, very good with the pink ball and very skilful. They have a nice wrist position. We are going to have to be on our 'A' game to get a victory here."

Pakistan are considering changes after their innings-and-five-run defeat. Fast bowler Mohammad Abbas, controversially omitted in Brisbane, is set to return, possibly for Imran Khan or Naseem Shah.

His international career reborn in England, Wade revealed he was in talks to join an English county side next year, while he also is debating whether to nominate for next month's Indian Premier League draft. He had one year in the world's premier Twenty20 domestic competition when he represented the Delhi Daredevils in 2011.

"I am not 100 per cent sure yet. I am trying to tee something up in England at the moment so, hopefully, I will go there for a little bit. But I will wait and see," he said.

"I don't want to play heaps of cricket. I found when I didn't play a lot of cricket in the off-season, it refreshed me and I really got the best out of myself over the last couple of years, so I don't want to burn myself out chasing too hard."


https://www.smh.com.au/sport/cricke...-comes-to-day-night-test-20191128-p53ex3.html
 
I really feel Australia are wasting time on Matthew Wade becoming a specialist batsman at this stage of his career.
 
Amazing batting so far. Not out on 70(46). back to Back fifties. I would say he is really making a claim for the Opening slot in WC, in absence of Warner. Good against spin too.
 
If he is going to play at the World T20 , it will have to be in the middle order as Warner and Finch are certainties to open.
 
Made Pakistan pay tonight, as tough as they come:

<div style="width: 100%; height: 0px; position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.250%;"><iframe src="https://streamable.com/e/jv20wy" frameborder="0" width="100%" height="100%" allowfullscreen style="width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;"></iframe></div>
 
Top knock.

In Down Under, he looked like a poor downgraded version of Rishabh Pant who was only there for sledging and doing nothing impactful with bat. Even while sledging, he ended up making a mockery of him more often. But happy for him that he showed his worth today for his team. Top knock from him.
 
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Australia's Matthew Wade Plans To Retire After T20 World Cup 2022

Australia wicketkeeper-batter Matthew Wade on Thursday said he may "walk into sunset" after the ICC Men's T20 World Cup 2022. (More Cricket News)

The T20 World Cup 2022 is scheduled from October 16 to November 13 in Australia, with the Melbourne Cricket Ground to host the final.

Wade had blazed his way to an unbeaten 17-ball 41 effort to play a pivotal role in Australia's dramatic five-wicket victory against Pakistan in the semifinal of the recently concluded T20 World Cup 2021.

However, he missed out on a Test spot to Alex Carey for the Ashes and now the stumper's goal is defending the T20 World Cup 2022 title at home.

"That'll be my next motivation - hopefully get to that World Cup, defend the title and then I can sail off into the sunset," Wade was quoted as saying by cricket.com.au.

"I certainly won't be playing (international cricket) beyond that point. That would be my goal from here."

Matthew Wade also revealed that he had played final against New Zealand with a grade 2 side strain, which he got during training before the summit clash.

"I was a little bit worried the night before the game, for sure. If I had have woken up and I couldn't swing the bat, I wouldn't have played,"

"I was worried that if we'd batted first and I had to go as hard as I could and I tore it then, I wouldn't be able to keep and that would hurt the team a lot.

"But in my mind, they would have had to strap me to the bed. I was always going to go out there and play. But I wouldn't have played if there was a chance it was going to hurt the team.

Matthew Wade was not even able to hit balls with much force in the pre-game warm-up.

"I went and hit some balls before the game and bluffed my way through that. Then they made me hit a few more, but I got through it and it felt pretty fine."

Australia skipper Aaron Finch said "There was always a little bit of a fear (of Wade missing the final)."

"The doctor forced him into a scan. He didn't want to know the result, but I knew … and being a grade two tear in his side, it was going to be tough.

Finch , who had undergone a knee surgery in August, revealed he had pushed his body to the limit to be prepared for the ICC event.

"I pushed the rehab really hard and probably paid the price for it a little bit throughout the tournament," he said.

"I may need a bit more time off at the moment to get that right. I was never in doubt to miss a game (but) I was in doubt to field anywhere other than first slip. It looked like there was going to be a first slip for 20 overs at one point!

"The boys kept spraying me after the game … (saying) we were here for the IPL, we never saw a catch at slip, we don't need one. And I said 'yes we do!'" Finch said.

https://www.outlookindia.com/websit...ans-to-retire-after-t20-world-cup-2022/401431
 
<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">MATTY WADE!! &#55357;&#56613;<br><br>3 sixes off ramps in an OVER &#55358;&#56623;<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/BBL12?src=hash&ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#BBL12</a> <a href="https://t.co/5mKly4eiNT">pic.twitter.com/5mKly4eiNT</a></p>— KFC Big Bash League (@BBL) <a href="https://twitter.com/BBL/status/1609074958063505410?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 31, 2022</a></blockquote>
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"We're Preparing From The IPL": Australia Star Ready For Spin Test In T20 World Cup 2024​


Australia vice-captain Matthew Wade believes the side will encounter “a lot of spin challenge” in the Super Eight stage of the ongoing T20 World Cup. Led by Mitchell Marsh, the Australian team has already secured its place in the Super Eight stage, having triumphed in its first three matches. However, a spin-laden trial awaits them, as they brace for encounters against cricketing giants India, Afghanistan, and likely Bangladesh in Asian-dominated Group 1. Australia's path to potentially clinching a second T20 World Cup and completing the set of all three major men's ICC global titles on a trot is clear but fraught with obstacles.

"A lot of us have prepared for plenty of spin depending on what venue you get to. Guys have been preparing for that through the world, through IPL into the start of this World Cup," Wade said.

The upcoming match against Scotland in St Lucia on Saturday may seem like a mere formality for the Aussies, who have already ensured their progression. Yet, the clash holds substantial stakes for defending champions England, whose tournament fate hinges on the result. An Australian loss would spell the end of England's campaign, adding an extra layer of intrigue to the fixture.

"We expect nothing different, and on their day they're all going to be very, very hard teams to beat. We're expecting them to hit us with a fair bit of spin over the next little bit."

In the slower pitches of the Caribbean, spin will be a crucial weapon. India, despite having relied on their quick bowlers in the USA, boasts a formidable spin arsenal including Ravindra Jadeja, Axar Patel, Yuzvendra Chahal, and Kuldeep Yadav.

Afghanistan, even without the injured Mujeeb Ur Rahman, can deploy the likes of Rashid Khan, Noor Ahmed, and Mohammad Nabi. Bangladesh, with rising star Rishad Hossain, who has already claimed seven wickets in three matches, is also poised to exploit spin-friendly conditions.

St Vincent, where Australia will face Afghanistan, recently showcased significant help for spinners during the South Africa-Nepal match. This venue will be a stern test for the Australian batsmen, who must adapt quickly to counter the spin threat if they are to advance.

At 36, Wade continues to be a critical player for Australia, particularly in high-pressure situations batting at no. 7. Reflecting on his career and future, Wade shared his thoughts on possibly bidding farewell after this tournament.

"I'm at my best when it's the last opportunity," he mused. "Hopefully I can pull some good stuff out in the next little bit, but it will be the same conversation at the end of this one. There are going to be players go out of this team. I'm more than comfortable if I'm one of them to get the next cycle of players coming in to play for Australia."

 
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