[PICTURES] "All Eyes On Vaishno Devi": Hasan Ali's post on Reasi terrorist attack viral

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Pakistan cricket team pacer Hassan Ali has reacted on the attack with a post which has gone viral. "All eyes on Vaishno Devi attack," he posted on Instagram story. Ali's wife Samiya hails from India.

A deadly terror attack on a bus carrying pilgrims in Jammu and Kashmir's Reasi district has grabbed the world's attention. Nine people were killed and 41 injured as the terrorists opened fire at the 53-seater bus, which was on its way from the Shiv Khori temple to the Mata Vaishno Devi shrine in Katra, causing it to veer off the road and fall into a deep gorge near the Teryath village of the Poni area of Reasi on Sunday evening.

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What are your thoughts on this?
 
Bit of a shocker this from Hassan Ali! but well done to him.
 
Didn't expect this from Hassan Ali but yep all such attacks must be condemned. Hopefully Indians would condemn the Israelites too
 
Much better than any tweet or statement we’ve seen from an Indian cricketer in regards to a terror attack in Pakistan.
 
Good from Hasan Ali. Terrorism is terrorism, irrespective of geographical location. God knows when the madness in the Middle East will stop.
 
Terrorism is terrorism and it has no boundaries. It should be condemned by each and every human being. Good to see something serious from Hassan Ali.
 
The murder of innocents on a religious pilgrimage should be condemned. Good that Hassan has highlighted this instance.
 
Cowardly attack on pilgrims…. Handful of terrorists left in J&K and that too on the backing from India alliance. On the day when India alliance extend their support to BJP government on J&K terrorism, the remaining terrorists will shoot themselves
 
I wanted to ask if Hasan Ali has removed his post yet. I'm asking because some Indian celebrities posted 'All eyes on Rafah' and then removed it after facing trolling from 'andhbhakhts'. Kudos to Hasan Ali if he hasn't done the same. :inti
 
Those separating cricket from politics after Reasi tragedy are either delusional or Pakistani

Last Friday, New York—a city for which the sport called cricket is mostly alien —woke up to witness the greatest cricketing rivalry: India vs. Pakistan at Nassau Stadium. As this grand sporting spectacle played out in the United States, far away in India, in a place called Reasi in Jammu and Kashmir, fellow citizens of the men in green had fixed a date too. On 9 June, terrorists affiliated with Pakistan’s Lashkar-e-Taiba attacked a bus carrying Hindu pilgrims heading to the Mata Vaishno Devi shrine in Katra. Nine of these civilians died – including two-year-old Kitu Sawhney and 14-year-old Anurag Verma.

Some Indians have rued the fact that our country only plays against Pakistan in world championships and not in bilateral series since the 26/11 terror attack.

To them, I would like to ask: Why do we even play against them in world championships? The Pakistani cricketer on the 22-yard pitch and the terrorist from his soil both represent not just the same country but the same institutionalised hatred against India, particularly Hindus. It’s just that one directly kills our civilians, while the other supports a system that sees jihadists as heroes and martyrs. Anyone who says that sports should be separated from politics is either delusional or a Pakistani.

Pakistani cricketers on Kashmir


Let’s take the examples of some of the most famous Pakistani cricketers and their comments on Kashmir:

  1. Shahid Afridi: Afridi has openly supported the Kashmiri separatist movement and has repeatedly made controversial statements. “India’s continued attempts to silence critical voices against its blatant human rights abuses are futile. Fabricated charges against #YasinMalik will not put a hold to #Kashmir‘s struggle to freedom. Urging the #UN to take notice of unfair & illegal trails against Kashmir leaders,” he tweeted. He also compared Indian Prime Minister Narender Modi to the Covid-19 virus while speaking on the Kashmir issue.
  2. Shoaib Akhtar: Akhtar has also frequently commented on the Kashmir issue, often aligning with the Pakistani government’s stance. He has called for international intervention on the issue and has expressed his views on the need for a resolution that favours Pakistan’s position on Kashmir. In an interview with Samaa TV, he even mentioned Ghazwa-e-hind (holy war against India).
  3. Imran Khan (former Pakistan cricketer and PM, now jailed by the Army): Imran has often cited Kashmir on international platforms. He even accused India of committing genocide of Muslims in Kashmir in one of his tweets.
Prominent Pakistani cricketers have clearly not shied away from making controversial statements about Kashmir, often aligning with their state’s narrative. These comments reflect a narrative that views the conflict in Kashmir through a religious and ideological lens. Terror groups like Lashkar and Hizbul are perceived as freedom fighters involved in pious Jihad in Kashmir.

Data speaks for itself

Now, let’s go a step further. What does this 2011 Pew Research Centre survey say about the viewpoint of average Pakistanis toward Hindu majority secular India?

A majority of Pakistanis (57 per cent) considered India the primary threat, while only 19 per cent cited the Taliban and merely 5 per cent identified al Qaeda as the most significant concern. Furthermore, just 36 per cent of Pakistanis viewed Lashkar-e-Taiba negatively.

So, 57 per cent viewed Hindu-majority India as an enemy, while only 36 per cent firmly disapproved of Lashkar and its terror activities. This suggests that the average Pakistani considers the thousands of killings by Pakistani terrorists—of innocent civilian Kashmiri Pandits, Kashmiri Muslims, Muslim police officers in Jammu and Kashmir, Indian Army personnel, Intelligence Bureau (IB) officers, National Investigation Agency (NIA) officers, Anti-Terrorism Squad (ATS) officers, and civilians across India—as acceptable. It’s evident that Pakistani cricketers are not exempt from reflecting these sentiments, which are so prevalent among average Pakistanis.

One can argue that there is a minority section in Pakistan that doesn’t support such terrorist acts against Indian civilians. An example is Pakistani cricketer Hassan Ali, who posted on his Instagram story: “All eyes on Vaishno Devi attack.”

However, Ali, whose wife Samiya hails from India, faced significant backlash, including death threats, prompting him to subsequently justify his stance and emphasise that he condemns all forms of terrorism. However, the backlash against Ali only highlights the average Pakistani mindset.

In the past week, the terror state of Pakistan continued its aggression with three consecutive attacks. This brings me to an important question: If the world could boycott the Apartheid state of South Africa, what stops our nation, a victim of countless terror attacks by Pakistan, from engaging with the country at global events?

Or have we normalised the thousands of terror attacks Pakistan has inflicted on us and our security forces in the last five decades? Cricket should continue because some Indians are missing the mouth-watering India-Pakistan rivalry on the field.

Two-year-old Kitu Sawhney died on the day we defeated Pakistan again. But are we truly winning, or have we simply grown accustomed to Pakistan’s tactics? Can even hundreds of Sawhneys not come in between the adrenaline rush we get while playing against a failed state on the ground?

 
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Those separating cricket from politics after Reasi tragedy are either delusional or Pakistani

Last Friday, New York—a city for which the sport called cricket is mostly alien —woke up to witness the greatest cricketing rivalry: India vs. Pakistan at Nassau Stadium. As this grand sporting spectacle played out in the United States, far away in India, in a place called Reasi in Jammu and Kashmir, fellow citizens of the men in green had fixed a date too. On 9 June, terrorists affiliated with Pakistan’s Lashkar-e-Taiba attacked a bus carrying Hindu pilgrims heading to the Mata Vaishno Devi shrine in Katra. Nine of these civilians died – including two-year-old Kitu Sawhney and 14-year-old Anurag Verma.

Some Indians have rued the fact that our country only plays against Pakistan in world championships and not in bilateral series since the 26/11 terror attack.

To them, I would like to ask: Why do we even play against them in world championships? The Pakistani cricketer on the 22-yard pitch and the terrorist from his soil both represent not just the same country but the same institutionalised hatred against India, particularly Hindus. It’s just that one directly kills our civilians, while the other supports a system that sees jihadists as heroes and martyrs. Anyone who says that sports should be separated from politics is either delusional or a Pakistani.

Pakistani cricketers on Kashmir


Let’s take the examples of some of the most famous Pakistani cricketers and their comments on Kashmir:

  1. Shahid Afridi: Afridi has openly supported the Kashmiri separatist movement and has repeatedly made controversial statements. “India’s continued attempts to silence critical voices against its blatant human rights abuses are futile. Fabricated charges against #YasinMalik will not put a hold to #Kashmir‘s struggle to freedom. Urging the #UN to take notice of unfair & illegal trails against Kashmir leaders,” he tweeted. He also compared Indian Prime Minister Narender Modi to the Covid-19 virus while speaking on the Kashmir issue.
  2. Shoaib Akhtar: Akhtar has also frequently commented on the Kashmir issue, often aligning with the Pakistani government’s stance. He has called for international intervention on the issue and has expressed his views on the need for a resolution that favours Pakistan’s position on Kashmir. In an interview with Samaa TV, he even mentioned Ghazwa-e-hind (holy war against India).
  3. Imran Khan (former Pakistan cricketer and PM, now jailed by the Army): Imran has often cited Kashmir on international platforms. He even accused India of committing genocide of Muslims in Kashmir in one of his tweets.
Prominent Pakistani cricketers have clearly not shied away from making controversial statements about Kashmir, often aligning with their state’s narrative. These comments reflect a narrative that views the conflict in Kashmir through a religious and ideological lens. Terror groups like Lashkar and Hizbul are perceived as freedom fighters involved in pious Jihad in Kashmir.

Data speaks for itself

Now, let’s go a step further. What does this 2011 Pew Research Centre survey say about the viewpoint of average Pakistanis toward Hindu majority secular India?

A majority of Pakistanis (57 per cent) considered India the primary threat, while only 19 per cent cited the Taliban and merely 5 per cent identified al Qaeda as the most significant concern. Furthermore, just 36 per cent of Pakistanis viewed Lashkar-e-Taiba negatively.

So, 57 per cent viewed Hindu-majority India as an enemy, while only 36 per cent firmly disapproved of Lashkar and its terror activities. This suggests that the average Pakistani considers the thousands of killings by Pakistani terrorists—of innocent civilian Kashmiri Pandits, Kashmiri Muslims, Muslim police officers in Jammu and Kashmir, Indian Army personnel, Intelligence Bureau (IB) officers, National Investigation Agency (NIA) officers, Anti-Terrorism Squad (ATS) officers, and civilians across India—as acceptable. It’s evident that Pakistani cricketers are not exempt from reflecting these sentiments, which are so prevalent among average Pakistanis.

One can argue that there is a minority section in Pakistan that doesn’t support such terrorist acts against Indian civilians. An example is Pakistani cricketer Hassan Ali, who posted on his Instagram story: “All eyes on Vaishno Devi attack.”

However, Ali, whose wife Samiya hails from India, faced significant backlash, including death threats, prompting him to subsequently justify his stance and emphasise that he condemns all forms of terrorism. However, the backlash against Ali only highlights the average Pakistani mindset.

In the past week, the terror state of Pakistan continued its aggression with three consecutive attacks. This brings me to an important question: If the world could boycott the Apartheid state of South Africa, what stops our nation, a victim of countless terror attacks by Pakistan, from engaging with the country at global events?

Or have we normalised the thousands of terror attacks Pakistan has inflicted on us and our security forces in the last five decades? Cricket should continue because some Indians are missing the mouth-watering India-Pakistan rivalry on the field.

Two-year-old Kitu Sawhney died on the day we defeated Pakistan again. But are we truly winning, or have we simply grown accustomed to Pakistan’s tactics? Can even hundreds of Sawhneys not come in between the adrenaline rush we get while playing against a failed state on the ground?


Have they investigated and concluded that Pakistanis were involved?

However overall what they are saying makes sense. India should also boycott playing Pakistan in ICC events. They pick and choose and it becomes difficult to keep up with
 
Those separating cricket from politics after Reasi tragedy are either delusional or Pakistani

Last Friday, New York—a city for which the sport called cricket is mostly alien —woke up to witness the greatest cricketing rivalry: India vs. Pakistan at Nassau Stadium. As this grand sporting spectacle played out in the United States, far away in India, in a place called Reasi in Jammu and Kashmir, fellow citizens of the men in green had fixed a date too. On 9 June, terrorists affiliated with Pakistan’s Lashkar-e-Taiba attacked a bus carrying Hindu pilgrims heading to the Mata Vaishno Devi shrine in Katra. Nine of these civilians died – including two-year-old Kitu Sawhney and 14-year-old Anurag Verma.

Some Indians have rued the fact that our country only plays against Pakistan in world championships and not in bilateral series since the 26/11 terror attack.

To them, I would like to ask: Why do we even play against them in world championships? The Pakistani cricketer on the 22-yard pitch and the terrorist from his soil both represent not just the same country but the same institutionalised hatred against India, particularly Hindus. It’s just that one directly kills our civilians, while the other supports a system that sees jihadists as heroes and martyrs. Anyone who says that sports should be separated from politics is either delusional or a Pakistani.

Pakistani cricketers on Kashmir


Let’s take the examples of some of the most famous Pakistani cricketers and their comments on Kashmir:

  1. Shahid Afridi: Afridi has openly supported the Kashmiri separatist movement and has repeatedly made controversial statements. “India’s continued attempts to silence critical voices against its blatant human rights abuses are futile. Fabricated charges against #YasinMalik will not put a hold to #Kashmir‘s struggle to freedom. Urging the #UN to take notice of unfair & illegal trails against Kashmir leaders,” he tweeted. He also compared Indian Prime Minister Narender Modi to the Covid-19 virus while speaking on the Kashmir issue.
  2. Shoaib Akhtar: Akhtar has also frequently commented on the Kashmir issue, often aligning with the Pakistani government’s stance. He has called for international intervention on the issue and has expressed his views on the need for a resolution that favours Pakistan’s position on Kashmir. In an interview with Samaa TV, he even mentioned Ghazwa-e-hind (holy war against India).
  3. Imran Khan (former Pakistan cricketer and PM, now jailed by the Army): Imran has often cited Kashmir on international platforms. He even accused India of committing genocide of Muslims in Kashmir in one of his tweets.
Prominent Pakistani cricketers have clearly not shied away from making controversial statements about Kashmir, often aligning with their state’s narrative. These comments reflect a narrative that views the conflict in Kashmir through a religious and ideological lens. Terror groups like Lashkar and Hizbul are perceived as freedom fighters involved in pious Jihad in Kashmir.

Data speaks for itself

Now, let’s go a step further. What does this 2011 Pew Research Centre survey say about the viewpoint of average Pakistanis toward Hindu majority secular India?

A majority of Pakistanis (57 per cent) considered India the primary threat, while only 19 per cent cited the Taliban and merely 5 per cent identified al Qaeda as the most significant concern. Furthermore, just 36 per cent of Pakistanis viewed Lashkar-e-Taiba negatively.

So, 57 per cent viewed Hindu-majority India as an enemy, while only 36 per cent firmly disapproved of Lashkar and its terror activities. This suggests that the average Pakistani considers the thousands of killings by Pakistani terrorists—of innocent civilian Kashmiri Pandits, Kashmiri Muslims, Muslim police officers in Jammu and Kashmir, Indian Army personnel, Intelligence Bureau (IB) officers, National Investigation Agency (NIA) officers, Anti-Terrorism Squad (ATS) officers, and civilians across India—as acceptable. It’s evident that Pakistani cricketers are not exempt from reflecting these sentiments, which are so prevalent among average Pakistanis.

One can argue that there is a minority section in Pakistan that doesn’t support such terrorist acts against Indian civilians. An example is Pakistani cricketer Hassan Ali, who posted on his Instagram story: “All eyes on Vaishno Devi attack.”

However, Ali, whose wife Samiya hails from India, faced significant backlash, including death threats, prompting him to subsequently justify his stance and emphasise that he condemns all forms of terrorism. However, the backlash against Ali only highlights the average Pakistani mindset.

In the past week, the terror state of Pakistan continued its aggression with three consecutive attacks. This brings me to an important question: If the world could boycott the Apartheid state of South Africa, what stops our nation, a victim of countless terror attacks by Pakistan, from engaging with the country at global events?

Or have we normalised the thousands of terror attacks Pakistan has inflicted on us and our security forces in the last five decades? Cricket should continue because some Indians are missing the mouth-watering India-Pakistan rivalry on the field.

Two-year-old Kitu Sawhney died on the day we defeated Pakistan again. But are we truly winning, or have we simply grown accustomed to Pakistan’s tactics? Can even hundreds of Sawhneys not come in between the adrenaline rush we get while playing against a failed state on the ground?


If you ask Afridi now, he will put his hands up….. imo the print has a communist and opposition parties backing.
 
Have they investigated and concluded that Pakistanis were involved?

However overall what they are saying makes sense. India should also boycott playing Pakistan in ICC events. They pick and choose and it becomes difficult to keep up with

In ICC events, India has to play with Pakistan, no alternative…. If they don’t play, then opposite side will get point…
 
In ICC events, India has to play with Pakistan, no alternative…. If they don’t play, then opposite side will get point…
There is an alternative.

ICC deliberately places India and Pakistan in the same groups every WC.

India should lobby them to stop this practice.
 
Have they investigated and concluded that Pakistanis were involved?

However overall what they are saying makes sense. India should also boycott playing Pakistan in ICC events. They pick and choose and it becomes difficult to keep up with
India’s position is clear- they do not want Pakistan to directly make money off India. You cannot be badmouthing India & suing BCCI & still expect them to fill up your coffers. ICC events are different as it is ICC who makes money from these events and distributes it to associate nations to develop cricket.
 
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