South Africa (60/1) thrash Afghanistan (56) by 9 wickets to advance to the final of ICC T20 World Cup 2024

BouncerGuy

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Aug 29, 2023
Runs
15,291
Following an intense conclusion to the Super Eight phase, where Afghanistan triumphed in a nail-biting match against Bangladesh in St Vincent, thereby eliminating Australia, the semi-finalists for the T20 World Cup 2024 have been finalized. South Africa, who topped Group 2, will face Afghanistan in the first semi-final. The match is scheduled for 8.30 pm local time on Wednesday, June 26, at the Brian Lara Stadium in Tarouba.

The first semi-final has been allotted an additional 60 minutes at the end of the day’s play, and a reserve day with an extra 190 minutes, if needed.

EOc3TnL.png


Squads:

Afghanistan:
Rashid Khan (c), Rahmanullah Gurbaz, Ibrahim Zadran, Azmatullah Omarzai, Najibullah Zadran, Mohammad Ishaq, Mohammad Nabi, Gulbadin Naib, Karim Janat, Nangyal Kharoti, Mujeeb Ur Rahman, Noor Ahmad, Naveen-ul-Haq, Fazalhaq Farooqi, Fareed Ahmad Malik.

South Africa: Aiden Markram (c), Ottniel Baartman, Gerald Coetzee, Quinton de Kock, Bjorn Fortuin, Reeza Hendricks, Marco Jansen, Heinrich Klaasen, Keshav Maharaj, David Miller, Anrich Nortje, Kagiso Rabada, Ryan Rickelton, Tabraiz Shamsi, Tristan Stubbs

=======

All posters please take note of the following guidelines for match threads on PakPassion:

1. No personal insults at other posters, players, officials, coaching staffs etc.

2. No making fun of player's, official's, coaching staff's names.

3. Do not add any references to media, their social media or post any pictures or screenshots from other sports websites.

4. Stick to commenting on this match. There is no need to bring other countries into the match discussion as there are plenty of other threads where those discussions can be added.
 
Last edited:
2 chokers but SA batting is far superior so they will win. Basically India or ENG are certain champions now.
 
2 chokers but SA batting is far superior so they will win. Basically India or ENG are certain champions now.
Only India said it from start they will win this tournament without losing a single game they the goat team of this era
 
The sun will never rise again for SA, should they lose it Qudrat ka Nizam finally working for SA definitely you cannot choke against Afg
 
Whatever happens, opportunity for something unique.

Either Afghanistan's first final or South Africa's first final in a World Cup.
 
Following an intense conclusion to the Super Eight phase, where Afghanistan triumphed in a nail-biting match against Bangladesh in St Vincent, thereby eliminating Australia, the semi-finalists for the T20 World Cup 2024 have been finalized. South Africa, who topped Group 2, will face Afghanistan in the first semi-final. The match is scheduled for 8.30 pm local time on Wednesday, June 26, at the Brian Lara Stadium in Tarouba.

The first semi-final has been allotted an additional 60 minutes at the end of the day’s play, and a reserve day with an extra 190 minutes, if needed.

EOc3TnL.png


Squads:

Afghanistan:
Rashid Khan (c), Rahmanullah Gurbaz, Ibrahim Zadran, Azmatullah Omarzai, Najibullah Zadran, Mohammad Ishaq, Mohammad Nabi, Gulbadin Naib, Karim Janat, Nangyal Kharoti, Mujeeb Ur Rahman, Noor Ahmad, Naveen-ul-Haq, Fazalhaq Farooqi, Fareed Ahmad Malik.

South Africa: Aiden Markram (c), Ottniel Baartman, Gerald Coetzee, Quinton de Kock, Bjorn Fortuin, Reeza Hendricks, Marco Jansen, Heinrich Klaasen, Keshav Maharaj, David Miller, Anrich Nortje, Kagiso Rabada, Ryan Rickelton, Tabraiz Shamsi, Tristan Stubbs

=======

All posters please take note of the following guidelines for match threads on PakPassion:

1. No personal insults at other posters, players, officials, coaching staffs etc.

2. No making fun of player's, official's, coaching staff's names.

3. Do not add any references to media, their social media or post any pictures or screenshots from other sports websites.

4. Stick to commenting on this match. There is no need to bring other countries into the match discussion as there are plenty of other threads where those discussions can be added.
If SA doesn't get to the final now, they should stop playing cricket.
 
Jonathan Trott (Afghanistan Coach) pre-match Press Conference - 25th June 2024
[Reporter:]

Jonathan, at the start of the tournament you were asked whether, there were a few critics of course who thought that Afghanistan had a fair shot of making it to the semi-finals. You gave a very guarded reply then. What's your response now?

[Jonathan Trott:]

Well, obviously they were right and they could see into the future. But obviously delighted, looking forward to the match against a strong South African side. We've played a game at Trinidad, so we've been there, there's familiarity about the ground and the conditions. So yeah, looking forward to it. And it's not every day you get to play in a World Cup semi-final. Obviously, this is the first time for Afghanistan, very proud. But I know those guys are very excited to go out there and to play against South Africa. We had a good game against them in the 50-over World Cup. There was neck and neck for a while. They obviously won the game. But we're looking forward to matching up against them.

[Reporter:]

If I can congratulate you on behalf of the whole Afghan nation. What would be the two or three learning points from this game that you think you could take into the semi-final against South Africa?

[Jonathan Trott:]

I just think batting we've got to be better all around - we left a lot of runs out there. Yes, it wasn't the greatest of wickets but so many times just bat on ball we just missed so many balls where we could have got singles or perhaps look to hit it in the gaps. But just a little bit of a narrow experience. I'm not sure if it's a little bit of nerves. But heck, we're in the semi-final now, nothing to lose. Very, very positive from now on in. But by no means do we feel like we're going into the semi-final just to compete. We're there to win the semi-final. We've seen we've beaten some major teams. We've won by large margins. We've won by tight margins. We've won in close games. So that's going to serve us well going forward to the semi-final.

[Reporter:]

Some of us felt that probably some of the over-celebration from the Australian game might have impacted the performance in today's game. It's going to be an even bigger celebration today. Are you in any way concerned that that might impact the game against South Africa as well? Do you want to stop them in their steps and tell them there is another huge game coming up?

[Jonathan Trott:]

No, I think it's important to celebrate moments, but I think what the real world-class players do or teams do is they're able to switch on and off at the right times. And I think for our guys this is a new experience, this is a new type of pressure as well. So, they get into grips with it the more they're playing these types of games the more accustomed they'll come to having the highs and lows that international cricket gives you but how to deal with it and stay on the right side of where you want to be mentally - whether you want to be over ambitious, overstimulated type thing, or you're too laid back. I think today we needed to be a little bit more ambitious of what we did.

[Reporter:]

When you took over as the Afghanistan head coach, did you at some point feel that this team could achieve what they have achieved today? And if I can put it bluntly to you, Jonathan, is it really happening? Do you believe this team could actually go on and achieve something that I don't even want to mention?

[Jonathan Trott:]

When I took over, yeah, I was astounded by the talent that I saw. I remember my first series was against Ireland and I saw a few of the batters play some shots that were just, I had no idea how good they were. But there was a certain rawness to it all and a sort of very, very, sort of no real structure to how the game was played or thought about. Very talented, but the game is played very mentally as well and becoming more structured, professional in the way that they approach the game, the way that they think about themselves and their teammates is the most important thing.

So, I've just tried to change those things or try and add here and there. At no stage have I tried to clip anybody's wings or rein in anybody with regards to their flair and talent. I'm just trying to add to it and make the bow of the arrow even stronger so that they can go for longer, win more games and shoot for the stars even further away.

[Reporter:]

A glittering career as a cricketer for England, including major wins, Ashes wins, and then today when they held you on their shoulders after the qualification was achieved, how did it feel and where would you rate it in terms of your cricketing memories and moments?

[Jonathan Trott:]

Yeah, it's a surreal moment, I should say. The whole thing, the whole day, the last four hours, I have no idea what happened. It's so topsy-turvy. And it started well. We wanted to bat. We wanted to get, we knew it wasn't a great surface, but we wanted to get at least 140, 150 and give ourselves a chance and knowing that they needed to do it in just over 12 overs, I think it was. And that would play into our hands, but then, yeah, so it was a real tricky one. And, boy, we keep entertaining people with the games of cricket that we play. It'd be nice to get back to winning by big margins. That'd be great.

[Reporter:]

Again, if you can rate this amongst the moments or memories as a cricket player and now as a coach?

[Jonathan Trott:]

I certainly think it's up there with that. One of the proudest moments that I've, certainly as a coach, but as a player, I think it's a different perspective you have and a different appreciation for things. As a coach you're not really in control that much. You can sort of guide and help and plan. You don't have that – you have that highs and lows and that's why a coach – because I still have that highs and lows. I still long for those feelings. When you leave the ground, you're going to have that high and sometimes the lows of games when you lose is what actually drives you to the next challenge. And it's a bit similar to playing. So that's why I love coaching, that's why I love being in the changing room and I love working with these guys. There's been quite a lot of ups and downs over the last month or years, a lot of growing pains if you like, but you see the guys tonight or a couple of nights ago and the smiles on their faces and the country all happy and hopefully cricket being re-energized and new people playing the game in all different parts of the countries and the world that this stage is on. That's great for the game.

[Reporter:]

Coming back to the semi-finals, South Africa, and Afghanistan, both in a way, I won't say uncharted territory for South Africa, they've been there before, but we all know how it has been tough for them crossing that line. Afghanistan first timers in the semi-final.

What do you think would the mindset be of both teams? Of course, you've spoken about your team already but South Africa and they've also won some really close games including last night against West Indies. What all to expect and what all to look forward to from an Afghanistan perspective, as well as an overall perspective on the semifinal?

[Jonathan Trott:]

I think it's a case of us just looking at what we need to improve on, which is a few little areas. Nothing too major, just tighten up. I think it's just a sort of mindset shift if I like. But I also think, we go into the semi-final with no scarring or no history with regards to semi-finals. This is uncharted territory for us. We're just going to go out there and give it our all. There's no preconceived ideas on it all, or history of failure or success in semifinals in past years. For us it's a new challenge and I think that makes us dangerous in the semifinals as a side with nothing to lose and obviously a lot of pressure on the opposition.

[Reporter:]

Just lastly Jonathan I wanted to have your opinion on something that I come across when I meet fans but some pundits as well. Some people believe that perhaps when it comes to the structure or the makeup of the squad and the team, that perhaps there are fewer full-time batters and probably just one or two too many all-rounders. Is that because you think no batter is good enough at this stage to come through and make a place for himself in the squad or do you think it's deliberate to go with that many all-rounders in the team?

[Jonathan Trott:]

I've had this and it's a good question. I've had this conversation and I think it's again a mindset shifting that needs to be done. If you look at all the teams around the world, especially T20, the more all-rounders you have, the more options you give the captain with the ball, the better. If there are batters who bat better than all-rounders, then they'll play. But if your all-rounders batsmen are better than the batsmen you currently have, then you're going to play the all-rounder, whether he bowls is irrelevant. If he's a better batsman and gives us that option, that's great.

I think we've got to get away from the stigma of having six batsmen, a keeper and a couple of bowlers. I think if you look at Australia, they've got all-rounders all around the park. If you look at India, they've got all-rounders. If you look at England, they've got all-rounders. So, the top teams have all-rounders, we've got all-rounders. That's why we're in the semifinals. We got a person like Gulbaddin [Naib] can come on and bowl get us wickets, a crucial wicket. That's why you have all-rounders.
 
People are again underestimating Afghanistan. They have beaten Bangladesh, New Zealand and Australia. They are no pushovers.
 
Match Officials named for ICC Men’s T20 World Cup 2024 Semi-Finals

Richard Illingworth and Nitin Menon will be on the on-field umpires when Afghanistan make history by playing in their first ICC Men’s T20 World Cup semi-final.

An eight-run win against Bangladesh, via DLS, secured safe passage from the Super 8s at Australia’s expense.

They will play South Africa in Trinidad on Wednesday June 26, with a place in Saturday’s final on the line.

South Africa are looking to secure a maiden ICC Men’s T20 World Cup final appearance.

Richard Kettleborough will be the TV Umpire, with Ahsan Raza in place as Fourth Umpire.

In the second match, Chris Gaffaney and Rodney Tucker will be in the middle as India and England meet for the second tournament running in the semi-finals.

Reigning champions England booked their place in the final four with a 10-wicket win against co-hosts USA, while India put the finishing touches to a perfect Super 8s stage with a 24-run win over Australia.

Joel Wilson will be the TV Umpire for a re-run of the 2022 semi-final, which saw England come out on top, with Paul Reiffel in place as the fourth umpire in Guyana on 27 June.

Semi-finals – Match Official appointments

June 26: South Africa v Afghanistan (Trinidad)

Referee: Richie Richardson

On-field Umpires: Richard Illingworth and Nitin Menon

TV Umpire: Richard Kettleborough

Fourth Umpire: Ahsan Raza

June 27: India v England (Guyana)

Referee: Jeffrey Crowe

On-field Umpires: Chris Gaffaney and Rodney Tucker

TV Umpire: Joel Wilson

Fourth Umpire: Paul Reiffel
 
Need South Africa to win this otherwise the final will be way too one-sided and boring. England and India would devour Afghanistan
 
Rob Walter (South Africa Coach) pre-match Press Conference - 25th June 2024

[Reporter:]

Rob, feels like a semifinal?

[Rob Walter:]

This is an empty hall, which is a good sign, I think.

[Reporter:]

Why would you say that it's a good sign?

[Rob Walter:]

Maybe there's not a lot of energy around the semi-final. No, I'm just joking. It's all good. It is what it is. It's not really about the press but about the occasion, isn't it?

[Reporter:]

You would prefer it to be low-key, just like another game?

[Rob Walter:]

It's never just another game. I think that sort of rhetoric around semifinals is always untrue, or people trying to downplay the occasion. Certainly, we don't do that. It is a semifinal of a World Cup, and we appreciate that and we're looking forward to it.

[Reporter:]

Now that you have passed that last kind of banana peel or whatever, how did you process the information that there are teams that have made it to the semi-final despite two losses and you are having to win nine out of nine in such a volatile format. How did you at that moment, how did you process it, internalize it?

[Rob Walter:]

I mean, sort of our language is - there's no point in worrying about what other teams had to do to get to a semi-final. Ultimately your journey is your journey, right? So, you got to do it the way you have to. Ours meant that we had to win seven games in a row in T20 to get to a semi-final. I'm super proud that we were able to do it and here we are.

[Reporter:]

And not just any T20 games, most of them have been close games. What do you think is different in this run than the earlier tournaments maybe?

[Rob Walter:]

I mean, there's no doubt that there's a lot of teams who can compete with each other now in the T20 format. It's great for the game. The more competitive sides playing the game of cricket, the better. We're seeing Afghanistan in a T20 semifinal. It's awesome for the game of cricket. I love the way they play the game and the way they support it. So, as I said, the more teams we can have competing at the top level, the better for the game and it grows the game itself. And from the closeness point of view, yeah, we've managed to get over the line in quite a number of close games in the lead up to the semifinal, which for a team has been great for us. We've potentially missed out on a few of those moments in the past, and this time around we managed to get over the line. So, we certainly take confidence out of that.

[Reporter:]

As you said, at times in the past you missed out on some close moments. I know you are elite sports people and you don't want to say that but luck does play a big part in those matches. Luck.

[Rob Walter:]

I don't think you can win a cricket game because of luck. I think potentially a few things can go your way but there's a few things that might not. So, skill will always trump luck, that's for sure. So, I'd like to think that.

[Reporter:]

With all these close wins you feel this this might finally be the time for South Africa.

[Rob Walter:]

Definitely it's always great to dream And I think everyone in South Africa dreams of the time when a trophy gets lifted. No doubt that will happen. Whether it's going to be this week, that remains to be seen. We're just going to try and play the best game of cricket that we can. And we still haven't played our best game yet.

[Reporter:]

Do all the previous close ones, the near misses, do they weigh on your mind when you go into a semi-final?

[Rob Walter:]

Look, I said, the near misses in the past, they belong to the people who missed them. To be honest, this team is a different team. We own whatever is ours to own. And so, our nearest reflection point is this tournament where we've managed to get over the line. So that's what we think about

[Reorter:]

Specifically, about tomorrow. What can we expect from the conditions the pitch?

[Rob Walter:]

Unsure. I Think we've I suppose the most positive thing about our campaign is that we've kind of encountered it all, to be honest. We've played in very different conditions. We've played on pitches that have given us something different every time. And we've been able to respond to the conditions pretty well. So tomorrow will be just the same. I think if you arrive with a preconceived idea about how the pitch will play, then you've already decided. We'll make an assessment of what's in front of us and then play the best cricket accordingly.

[Reporter:]

And just on Reeza's form, is that a big concern coming into these two big matches or are we looking at the same combinations?

[Rob Walter:]

Reeza's form doesn't bother me at all. He's a quality cricketer. It was just, what, three and a half weeks ago that he scored a magnificent 80 against the West Indies, a man-alone performance really. Over the last year and a half, he's been unbelievable, even beyond that in T20 cricket to be fair. So, he's a wonderful cricketer and that good batsmen are just one shot away from contributing to the team and that's all we Interested in is giving him the freedom to do that

[Reporter:]

and some of your middle batsmen – who are well known for being explosive batters, have had to adjust and score at around 100. Tristan, I think, is a great batter. How proud are you at seeing them adjust to what is required conditions?

[Rob Walter:]

Yeah, super proud. Again, I'm proud of the team to be honest, to be unbeaten, getting to the semi-final. Again, it doesn't just happen from a batting point of view. The batsmen have probably had to respond the most because the conditions have been very foreign to what you would normally experience in T20 cricket, especially for the guys who come from IPL. We saw significantly high scores in the IPL and a very different method of the game being played but I think everyone knew that would be slightly different in in America and the Caribbean but you still have to adjust you still have to taper and temper your games accordingly and the guys have done that very well.

[Reporter:]

And just finally, as you said, people who say that's a semifinal or a final is just another game is not true. In terms of smaller markers, how does it affect you in terms of how you're training, the kind of sleep you're getting, smaller things, where do you see the change in the lead up to the match?

[Rob Walter:]

Look, I mean for us, from a training point of view, that's almost irrelevant. We played three games in five days with travel in between. So, there's been no training barring a smaller group that came out today. It's really about physically and mentally getting fresh for another competitive game of cricket, which is a semi-final.

If you're asking about sleep, mine's never very good, so I can't comment on that. But no, I mean there is such a cool energy in the team at the moment, it's a very close group of people, we've come a long way together, spent some great times together and so this is just another one of those in the journey of cricket that we're on.

[Reporter:]

I was just asking about any smaller signs of excitement or anxiety or whatever that tells you Hey this is a special day coming up.

[Rob Walter:]

I think there's always an energy that you can feel that's tangible when it comes to a semi-final. There'll be a mixture of emotions which is with anxiety but excitement and I think anyone in any sport, if they get to this phase of a competition, feels that. And so really, it's just acknowledging that and accepting it and then just understanding what you'll do with that. We still want to play our best cricket in the key moments of the game tomorrow.

[Reporter:]

How well do you know Afghanistan?

[Rob Walter:]

Look, I mean, a number of their players play in a number of the leagues around the world. In this day and age, there's not too many players where there's no footage or no information about. So, from an Afghanistan player point of view, we do have that sort of information. We've also got an entire World Cup, which they've also played seven games in. So, from that point of view, we've had the opportunity to watch games of cricket as near as last night and then also in the different leagues that the guys have played and played together. So, we're comfortable with our knowledge in it.

[Reporter:]

What are you weary of in Afghanistan?

[Rob Walter:]

I think you, yeah, you would have seen it all in the last two days. I think they are a well-rounded team. Gone are the days where there is an area of the team that is not strong. They wouldn't be in a semi-final if that was the case. You're talking about some world-class spinners. Everyone knows about the world-class spinners led by Rashid Khan. I mean, he's a top-class T20 spinner anywhere in the world. So, we know about that. But as I said, it's not a one-man show anymore. That's for sure. The opening pairing, statistically, have been outstanding in this tournament alone and so yeah, I mean they're a well-rounded side with great experience played some very good cricket in the last couple of games to actually make a semifinal so yeah, they're there for a reason.

[Reporter:]

Afghanistan has already played here in this World Cup, you have not. Do you think this means a slight advantage for Afghanistan coming into this game or do you think it doesn't matter?

[Rob Walter:]

I think to be fair the pitches have been that variable even at the same grounds and same stadiums that I don't see it as a huge competitive advantage to be honest you're still going to have to play the best cricket on the day irrespective of the pitch if you want to try and win the game, so if there's an advantage maybe there's a small one but certainly nothing that's that worries me too much.

[Reporter:]

Last question from me what would it mean to you and the team if you make it to the final?

[Rob Walter:]

Pretty obvious, isn't it? Yeah, one step at a time So to make it into a final would obviously be great for the side Sydney as head coach. I hope that that is written in our destiny. There's a lot of players in this team who deserve to be part of that showpiece. But the game doesn't owe anyone anything, right? And so, we have to go and earn the opportunity to be there. And we'll see at whatever time tomorrow night, finish the game at 1.30 a.m. Just a few days ago. So, it might be the same. But whatever time the game finishes, we'll see then.
 
The 'under-utilised' secret weapon that may hold the key for South Africa's semi-final tilt

South Africa captain Aiden Markram’s cool head - and how much he backs himself - might just be the difference in a T20 World Cup semi-final in the eyes of a fellow Proteas spinner.

Unflustered and uncluttered by a crowd cauldron created in Antigua, it could be argued Aiden Markram’s captaincy just one over into their quasi-knockout match against the West Indies was the difference between the two sides, setting the tone with a genius bowling ploy: bowling himself.

After Marco Jansen’s successful first over, claiming the wicket of Shai Hope, Markram shouldered the responsibility at the other end, taking the dangerous Nicholas Pooran head on with his off-spin.

First ball, Markram dangled the carrot. Pooran chased, failing to middle with his advancing drive, and holing out to Jansen for a crucial catch.

The wicket put the hosts in a hole. The crowd, earlier buoyed by David Rudder’s live rendition of Rally ‘Round the West Indies, were now subdued. A rebuild through Kyle Mayers and Roston Chase built anticipation, though South Africa continued their press. Tabraiz Shamsi’s Player of the Match efforts tied the West Indies down, held to 135/8, a score too small to realistically contain South Africa’s batting in reply.

Shamsi, who claimed 3/27 (4) coming in to bowl later in the innings, backed Markram’s bowling, and the skipper’s nerve of taking things on himself in the Powerplay against one of the world’s best batters.

“I actually always think he underbowls himself whenever he's captain, (but) he is a wonderful bowler,” Shamsi exclaimed after their win against the West Indies.

“I think he's a lot better than a part-timer so it was nice as a captain he saw that there was something in it for him and he ran with it and he bowled all four overs.”

“When you see another spinner taking wickets, it gives you confidence as well to know that when it's your turn, there'll be something in it for you.”

Moving south to Trinidad, the South Africans now have an opportunity to book tickets for their first ever Men’s T20 World Cup final, and just how much confidence Markram has in his off-spin again could dictate the Proteas’ selection for their Afghan semi-final assignment.

While Markram’s batting is vital in South Africa’s late tournament push, his 1/28 (4) against the hosts brings his career T20I economy to under eight an over, taking a wicket every 22.5 deliveries in the format.

Should he take it upon himself to bowl close to his full allotment, there is less pressure on nailing the selection call between Shamsi and quick Ottneil Baartman as the fifth frontline bowler. If Shamsi was to get the nod again, the side could use up to 12 overs of spin or 12 overs of pace, giving Markram and the Proteas bowling flexibility.

In the eyes of Shamsi, it’s the luxury of choice in world class bowlers, and the backing of the individuals in a groove that puts them apart.

“The one thing that's nice about our unit, if you look at the squad, there isn't any individual that you can pick and say ‘hey, this guy is responsible for making this team win’.

“There's no pressure on any one individual.”

“I think it doesn't really matter where I'm asked to bowl, whether it's early on in the innings or at the back end. There's a specific job that I've got to do.

“That's the mentality that we have within the squad. Whoever's day it is needs to take extra load and cover up for someone that's maybe not having a good game and that's perfectly normal. That's cricket.”

Of course, the players to stand up have done so when conditions have suited. Beginning their campaign in the USA, the Proteas’ fabled pace attack delivered early in the tournament, before a move to the Caribbean and slower wickets allowed the spinners to work their way in.

The Proteas are unbeaten to this point, though have no doubt been pushed in their campaign, holding their nerve in what could be considered five close finishes in seven matches.

While the side have faced their own challenges, there is a feeling observing the camp that the inhibitions that have hampered previous Proteas teams do not affect the class of 2024 in the same way.

For Shamsi, the current side looking to go where no South Africa side has gone before have a different outlook on pressure.

“Obviously most of the games have been a lot closer than we would have personally liked, but the amazing thing is that this new Proteas team always seems to get over the line.

“So, I think that's what's making the guys play without any pressure because we all know we have the ability to win the games but there's no pressure on any individual to actually do it otherwise we're in trouble.”

“We've been put under huge pressure basically in every single game that we've played and the boys have managed to find a way to win no matter what the situation is, no matter how close the game is.”

ICC
 
South africa has to beat Afghanistan here otherwise final against India will be same story.

Afghanistan won't try to win against India.
 
Will be an easy win for SAF. I think SAF is winning this WC this time.
 
South Africa are favorites to win. However the choking tag may play on their minds. AFG having Dwayne Bravo as their coach will more than likely be the crowd favorite. I really hope Afghanistan win this game.:love::love::love: Supporting them all the way
 
I wish they weren't facing each other but instead made it to final. Would be nice for each of then to win the whole thing for a change
 
Is that wicket batting or bowling friendly?
Following an intense conclusion to the Super Eight phase, where Afghanistan triumphed in a nail-biting match against Bangladesh in St Vincent, thereby eliminating Australia, the semi-finalists for the T20 World Cup 2024 have been finalized. South Africa, who topped Group 2, will face Afghanistan in the first semi-final. The match is scheduled for 8.30 pm local time on Wednesday, June 26, at the Brian Lara Stadium in Tarouba.

The first semi-final has been allotted an additional 60 minutes at the end of the day’s play, and a reserve day with an extra 190 minutes, if needed.

EOc3TnL.png


Squads:

Afghanistan:
Rashid Khan (c), Rahmanullah Gurbaz, Ibrahim Zadran, Azmatullah Omarzai, Najibullah Zadran, Mohammad Ishaq, Mohammad Nabi, Gulbadin Naib, Karim Janat, Nangyal Kharoti, Mujeeb Ur Rahman, Noor Ahmad, Naveen-ul-Haq, Fazalhaq Farooqi, Fareed Ahmad Malik.

South Africa: Aiden Markram (c), Ottniel Baartman, Gerald Coetzee, Quinton de Kock, Bjorn Fortuin, Reeza Hendricks, Marco Jansen, Heinrich Klaasen, Keshav Maharaj, David Miller, Anrich Nortje, Kagiso Rabada, Ryan Rickelton, Tabraiz Shamsi, Tristan Stubbs

=======

All posters please take note of the following guidelines for match threads on PakPassion:

1. No personal insults at other posters, players, officials, coaching staffs etc.

2. No making fun of player's, official's, coaching staff's names.

3. Do not add any references to media, their social media or post any pictures or screenshots from other sports websites.

4. Stick to commenting on this match. There is no need to bring other countries into the match discussion as there are plenty of other threads where those discussions can be added.
 
South africa has to beat Afghanistan here otherwise final against India will be same story.

Afghanistan won't try to win against India.
Hahaha.... at least make conspiracy theories after the semi finals have finished. Patience man patience
 
For Aghanistan to win, their openers need to survive Rabada, Nortje and Jansen first. If they do that and manage to bat like how they did against Bangals, and Rashid comes in much earlier... they have a chance.
 
I hope the Proteas can update some softwares and also save the cricket world from noise pollution.
 
South africa has won all the close games each one of them they should have lost. Got wickets of full tosses, Somehow conjured up wins. It would be hilarious if they run into another close game and lose this one. I doubt SA will lose as their fast bowling is breathing fire and they will be too much for Bangladesh especially if SA bats first. If SA bats second and Afghanista conjures a total like 130 to 140 then game on.
 
Come On Afghanistan , win the match and made the history .

141 Crore indian will be rooting for you guys . :kp
 
Afghanistan have won the toss and have opted to bat


South Africa
(Playing XI): Quinton de Kock(w), Reeza Hendricks, Aiden Markram(c), Heinrich Klaasen, David Miller, Tristan Stubbs, Marco Jansen, Keshav Maharaj, Kagiso Rabada, Anrich Nortje, Tabraiz Shamsi

Afghanistan (Playing XI): Rahmanullah Gurbaz(w), Ibrahim Zadran, Azmatullah Omarzai, Gulbadin Naib, Mohammad Nabi, Karim Janat, Rashid Khan(c), Nangeyalia Kharote, Noor Ahmad, Naveen-ul-Haq, Fazalhaq Farooqi
 
SA fans who thought their team had turned a corner are most probably gonna learn this isn't true today.
 
oh my god.. lol That was a juicy half volley. No movement. Just angle. Should have gone full blooded.
 
Yes, the main man is gone. Take another opener now
 
south africa deserve this world cup wont be choking today
No one deserves anything. That way India deserves it too for the talent it has produced or the thrashings it has handed teams in group stages of WCs.

If you can't handle the pressure, you don't deserve the title. SA like India need to earn it.
 
Real performance comes when you’re in a knockout game and people expect you to win and perform well. Gurbaz failed. Let’s see how others perform.
 
Real performance comes when you’re in a knockout game and people expect you to win and perform well. Gurbaz failed. Let’s see how others perform.
Some random guys often find the zone in finals. They don't necessarily have to be super stars because opposition focus is mostly on that guy.
 
Jansen is tricking everyone by bowling wides and then slipping iin wicket taking beauties between those wides.
 
Poor bounce, not liking the pitch for semis.
 
Back
Top