"I remember watching Wasim and Waqar bowl in 1992 and thinking Oh My God": Darren Gough

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Regarded as one of the pioneers of reverse-swing in English cricket, Darren Gough served his country with aplomb taking 467 wickets and was a key member of England's Test series-winning squad during the tour of Pakistan in 2000.

In an exclusive interview with PakPassion.net, Gough spoke of his memories of visiting Pakistan during the 1996 World Cup and the historic tour of 2000, how he learnt the art of reverse-swing by observing Wasim Akram and Waqar Younis, why Pakistan is able to produce young fast bowlers and his aspirations to coach in a franchise-based league such as the Pakistan Super League.



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PakPassion.net: You toured Pakistan on a couple of occasions, what was the experience like?

Darren Gough:
I’ve always loved going to Pakistan and I’ve had some great tours out there. During the 1996 World Cup, we were based in Lahore and I had a great experience. We stayed at the Pearl Continental which was really nice and the practice facilities provided were great. We were well looked after and I had a great time.


PakPassion.net: What are your memories of the Pakistan leg of the 1996 World Cup?

Darren Gough:
We were based in Lahore ahead of the 1996 World Cup which of course was held in three countries. To be honest, it was hard work for the pace bowlers. Dominic Cork, Peter Martin and I had to spend a lot of time out there to acclimatize as we just weren’t used to those types of conditions. The fact was that our team just was not adapted to those conditions, in terms of our batsmen and their ability to face spinners or the type of bowlers we had in our squad. Most of our cricketers in that World Cup were English-type cricketers who just were not suited to the pitches out there and that’s why we struggled.


PakPassion.net: What were the pitches like in Pakistan when you were out there?

Darren Gough:
The pitches were flat as you would expect and it was hard work, but you had to be on top of your game every single day as a bowler and there was no respite. If you were a spinner you might have got some help from the pitches, but if you didn’t do anything special with the ball as a fast-bowler it was going to be hard work.


PakPassion.net: How well did you and your team-mates adapt to life in Pakistan during the tours that you were part of?

Darren Gough:
We had great fun. We were regular visitors to the British High Commission in Lahore to stock up on food as we had a couple of guys in our squad like Alec Stewart and Jack Russell who were really picky eaters and all they ate was either tuna sandwiches or chicken breast or potatoes or baked beans. In fact, I think in Jack Russell’s case all he ate on that tour was baked beans.

Luckily for them, the British High Commission wasn't too far away and there was a shop near the High Commission which sold all of the English food they wanted. I prefer to embrace the local cuisine wherever I go, and I ate the local food. I remember going to a restaurant in Peshawar and sitting on the floor while we ate our food which was an unbelievable and great experience. I was with Mike Atherton and a couple of other team-mates, we sat on the floor at the restaurant and ate which was an amazing experience as I had never done that before.


PakPassion.net: What are your memories of the historic Karachi Test match of 2000 which ended in near-darkness?

Darren Gough:
I had bowled well in the previous Test match, so I was feeling confident. We knew about Pakistan’s Test record in Karachi and we knew it was going to be hard work as Pakistan had some good players like Wasim Akram, Waqar Younis, Mohammad Yousuf, Saeed Anwar, Saqlain Mushtaq and Danish Kaneria. On paper, Pakistan were a lot better than we were, but what we had a serious team spirit amongst us. That team spirit had started the year before against West Indies and it carried on to the tour of Sri Lanka where we won, and it continued onto the tour of Pakistan where we also won. It was the best team-spirit I have ever seen, and all the players would be together eating, drinking, taking part in activities every night throughout that tour.

To win that Test match in Karachi was quite extraordinary when you think back about it. Going into the final day there was just no chance of a result, but somehow we tied them down and they made a few risky calls and we got the wickets and then chased it down in the dark which was incredible. By the time the players came off, I remember celebrating on the balcony and it was pitch black. In fact, I reckon it was that dark that had the match not finished earlier, there would only have been time for just one more over and we would have had to go off. Moin Khan tried everything he possibly could but we managed to get that result which was a huge result for us.

Beating Pakistan in Pakistan was just amazing really and there are not many teams who had done that. That group of players took that win forward for the rest of their careers and after that believed they could beat anyone.


PakPassion.net: You were one of the first English bowlers to perfect the art of reverse-swing. How did you develop that skill?

Darren Gough:
Football was always my upbringing. I had never been to a professional cricket match or ground until I played for Yorkshire 2nd XI, so it was all just about football. But my cricket career took-off pretty quickly in 1988 when Yorkshire had a few injuries and I got a game for their second team after doing well for their Under 19s. Suddenly then in 1989, I was called up to play for Yorkshire first XI.

At that time my cricketing influence had come from Ian Botham after watching him in 1981 against Australia and my fellow Yorkshireman Geoffrey Boycott off course. Suddenly then Wasim Akram and Waqar Younis came over to England in 1992 and I remember watching them bowl and thinking Oh My God because nothing was flat and anything was possible when they were bowling. England would get off to good starts in that series 100 for none, 120 for 2 and then suddenly they were 170 all out and I thought there has to be something in this.

So, I watched Wasim and Waqar with great interest and I practised and practised and practised. I was always good at bowling yorkers because I bowled at the death from 19 years of age in One-day cricket for Yorkshire, but I never had that pace and that inswing, I just had that natural talent to bowl a decent yorker. I practised every day and because I was skiddy and had a fast-arm I started working a little bit with my action and dropping my arm a little bit like Waqar used to do. In 1993 I started doing the double-twirl as Waqar did and then I developed my own rhythm and confidence to bowl reverse-swing. For 5 years of my career, my reverse-swinging yorkers were right up there but it was mainly down to the influence of Waqar Younis and Wasim Akram.


PakPassion.net: When Wasim and Waqar were reverse-swinging the ball it was regarded as ball-tampering, yet when others started reverse-swinging the ball it suddenly became a skill.

Darren Gough:
It’s amazing really isn’t it. I think it was because of the history of it, where a couple of people had been caught doing stuff to the ball in the past. From my experience, I had also watched players doing it and seen players doing their best to make the ball dryer on one side and more abrasive on one side, and this was being done all around the world. It’s like the hidden rule where nobody says anything about it until they get caught.

We even had Michael Atherton putting dirt on the ball for this reason, but he wasn’t using his nails. I was bowling at the time and Ian Salisbury was bowling at the other end and a spinner always puts his hand down on the crease to keep his hand dry and he was doing that. I think Atherton innocently thought he would keep the ball dry on one side and sprinkled dirt on the ball. He didn’t have a clue what he was doing, but he saw Salisbury doing it and for some reason, he put his hand in his pocket and the rest is history. But I definitely got reverse-swing that day, so I didn’t complain and I got 8 wickets in the match, 4 wickets in each innings.

Unfortunately, the suspicions will always be there as soon as anyone starts to reverse the ball these days - it’s the first thing that is looked for. Reverse-swing can be done naturally, and also sometimes players do it in other ways such as throwing the ball into the wicket-keeper on the bounce. Warwickshire, for example, used to scuff the ball up on their dry pitches in One-day cricket. So, there are lots of ways this can be done, but it can definitely be done naturally. I can honestly say I did not have the fingernails to scratch the ball when I bowled. I honestly mean this, and I did it naturally. I had a fast arm, I had a low arm, and a nice side-on action and I used to get further round in my action when I wanted to reverse-swing the ball and I was a natural reverse-swing bowler.


PakPassion.net: You came across Shoaib Akhtar a few times, what was he like as an opponent?

Darren Gough:
Shoaib was the new kid on the block, obviously younger than me, but he was horrible to face. I remember at Durham defending a ball from him on the back foot and much to my amazement it went for four and I thought 'oh dear me!' He wasn’t impressed and the next two balls were lightning-fast and whistled past my ears. When he wanted to bowl quick, he was ridiculously fast. Even off a short run-up in Sharjah when Robert Croft and I were batting, he was bowling really fast. Crofty just would not run when I wanted a single whilst facing Shoaib. He made sure that he stayed at the non-striker’s end and didn’t face him. He bowled me out with an amazing yorker at Cardiff when I was 35 years old. It was rapid, I never even saw it. When he wanted to be, he was quicker than anybody else and he was a ridiculous talent.


PakPassion.net: What was it like bowling to the likes of Saeed Anwar, Inzamam-ul-Haq and Mohammad Yousuf?

Darren Gough:
I admired Saeed Anwar a lot and I thought that he was an unbelievable batsman. I remember watching him bat for Pakistan before I played international cricket and then I got the opportunity to play against him. He was an amazing talent and he and Aamir Sohail formed a good opening partnership. Ijaz Ahmed was around when I started playing for England and I found him to be a good batsman too. Then later came Younis Khan, Inzamam-ul-Haq and Mohammad Yousuf.

For me, Mohammad Yousuf was the best of the Pakistani batsmen. He was the hardest to dismiss, there was something about him as he was so gutsy and very determined. He always batted with a smile on his face. He understood you and wanted to keep on talking to you and have conversations with you as a bowler. He was that friendly, neighbourly face when you were bowling, but then when you looked at the scoreboard, he’d be closing in on a 50 before you knew it. We had an amazing battle in the 2001 series in England where he got runs and I thought this guy is a serious player. With Inzamam, you had to get him out early, because if he got in, he was very hard to get rid of once settled at the crease. And what can you say about Younis Khan? What a talent that guy was.


PakPassion.net: You played alongside Younis Khan and Inzamam-ul-Haq at Yorkshire, what was that like?

Darren Gough:
Younis is a lovely man. He is one of the nicest men I have ever met and the people in Yorkshire and Yorkshire County Cricket Club and the players he played with all still have huge respect for Younis. He was a team man who got involved with everything we were doing and as a player, he really excelled himself.

Inzamam played for us at Yorkshire for a short period but he wasn’t really the same. I think it was the end of his career and the hunger just wasn’t there like it was for Younis Khan. Inzi was a little difficult to handle, as in you never saw him at the club other than on match-days. I had to drop him from a one-day game because we were on a good run and he wasn’t playing well. Leaving him out of the one-day side was a big call as he was a top-name overseas player. He was a great player but when we signed Inzamam he didn’t really have that hunger for cricket, and it appeared as if he had nothing left to prove.


PakPassion.net: You’ve intermittently done some coaching over the years, but is that something you would like to do on a permanent basis?

Darren Gough:
Of course it is. Realistically, I’ve got a good job in the media but people keep saying to me why don’t you go into coaching. My answer to them is that I do love coaching and I even had my own academy a few years ago with some of the guys going on to play First-Class cricket. I did academy cricket videos for school kids, some of which were BAFTA nominated, so coaching has always been a big part of my life. I’m passionate about coaching and try to make it fun. I did some work a few years ago with England Under-19s and ECB have tried to get me involved the last couple of times when they’ve been looking for a bowling coach. But it’s difficult to take on that role because I’ve got a very good job at this moment in time in the media and I don’t want to be away for 50 weeks a year and that’s what it comes down to.

England did find a way for me to go and help them in New Zealand recently and I enjoyed my trip out there and Saqib Mahmood, Mark Wood and Chris Woakes wrote and said some nice words about me which was good to see. But realistically, it would have to be short-term coaching stints that would interest me because I love my current job and whoever gets me to coach gets the best of both worlds as I have an audience of millions on the radio as well. So, at the moment an international coaching position or a County position isn’t for me, although it might be right for me in future. Having said that, a franchise coaching role of a few weeks in the Indian Premier League or Pakistan Super League would be ideal.


PakPassion.net: So you would have no problems going to Pakistan do some coaching or media work?

Darren Gough:
I would have no problem with that at all. I’ve always enjoyed going to Pakistan, the people have always been friendly, and I have some great memories from my trips to Pakistan. Going to Pakistan has never been a problem for me and it still isn’t. I enjoyed the challenge of playing out there, the challenge of the pitches, and most importantly, the challenge of playing Pakistan in Pakistan. I’ve got good memories of going out there and I hope one day I can add to those memories of being out there in Pakistan once again.


PakPassion.net: What do you make of the young Pakistani pace-bowlers like Shaheen Shah Afridi and Naseem Shah?

Darren Gough:
Pakistan have never struggled for fast-bowlers and never will. These youngsters like Shaheen and Naseem are talented, they have raw pace and they do things on flat pitches that a lot of other bowlers cannot do. They have big hearts which you need on such pitches and are so passionate to succeed. Many Pakistani pace-bowlers don’t have privileged upbringings, so they work hard, and want to succeed and do well, make money and obviously want to be famous too. When you have those sorts of attributes it never surprises me with Pakistan and their endless supply-line of young pacers. They are brilliant to watch as they do things that other pacers cannot do as they have been brought up on wickets that are so flat so you have to be able to do something with the ball to succeed there.

The biggest problem for Pakistani pacers is when they come to the likes of England and they see the ball seaming around and they kind of don’t know how to deal with it. They don’t ease off the pace and do what the likes of Azhar Mahmood and Abdul Razzaq did when they played in England where they both were excellent with their variety, inswing, outswing and slower-balls. Sometimes the young Pakistani pacers just need to take their foot off the pedal when it comes to pace and instead make use of the conditions in places like England. Just look at the likes of Stuart Broad and James Anderson who are still taking wickets and getting the ball to move around without the need to bowl at 90 MpH.


PakPassion.net: You’ve seen the highs and lows of a professional cricketer’s career. What advice would you give to young, up and coming pace-bowlers to succeed in the modern game?

Darren Gough:
Fitness plays a big part in the modern game and central contracts are vital and an integral part of modern cricket. You only have to look at Stuart Broad and James Anderson in England which tells you the story. If you look at the English bowlers prior to them like myself, Andrew Caddick, Angus Fraser, Dean Headley and Dominic Cork, it was the case that if you played 50 Test matches you’d had a great career. But the guys who now have central contracts which started with Matthew Hoggard and Andrew Flintoff played 70 or so Test matches and nowadays the guys with the central contracts will go on to play 100 or more Test matches because they are not over-bowled. Central contracts are the key for young pacers. So, my advice to youngsters is that don’t under-bowl when you are young as you need to learn the trade and bowl 20-overs a day. And then when you get to the top level, don’t over-bowl and use your pace sparingly and wisely as you cannot keep bowling 20-overs every day for the rest of your life.
 
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He was England's Waqar Younis at times.

Formed a potent new ball partnership with Andy Caddick.

One of the great characters of our great game. Liked and respected by all.

His son Liam is a handy cricketer as well.

Many thanks to Goughie for taking the time out of his busy schedule to chat to PakPassion about Pakistan and Pakistan Cricket.

I hope we see him in Pakistan in late 2022 when England next tour if Talk Sport snap up the rights for that series.
 
Brilliant read - Cant remember when England had such a universally likeable fast-bowler! Also had the skills to go with that too.
 
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One of the smoothest bowling actions ever. Was a bit underrated and underutilized for lower order batting as well.
 
Goughy was great bowler and a bundle of energy. He was the type guy that you would have loved to have on your side.
 
One of my favourite English bowlers.

There's a bit of typical Pakistani pacer in him. He didn't mind going for runs, was raw when he came into cricket, didn't always do things via the coaching manual and was brilliant at reverse-swing.

Lovely speaking with him.
 
Darren Gough being in his prime in the 2005 Ashes side would have made that attack lethal. Gough was brilliant at tailenders with his 90 mph reverse swing. Its a pity he mostly played with a weak England side
 
Gough would've had an even better record had he been around to take advantage of central contracts. As it happened, he'd be bowled into the ground in county cricket.
 
Darren Gough being in his prime in the 2005 Ashes side would have made that attack lethal. Gough was brilliant at tailenders with his 90 mph reverse swing. Its a pity he mostly played with a weak England side

The problem was the County season grinding the bowlers down. If England had been able to field Fraser, Caddick, Cork and Gough consistently they would have won a lot of matches.

Then there were Atherton, Stewart, Thorpe, Nasser, Russell and Tufnell who had good careers.

Gough’s test career was over by 2005 anyway. His pace had gone.
 
The problem was the County season grinding the bowlers down. If England had been able to field Fraser, Caddick, Cork and Gough consistently they would have won a lot of matches.

Then there were Atherton, Stewart, Thorpe, Nasser, Russell and Tufnell who had good careers.

Gough’s test career was over by 2005 anyway. His pace had gone.

I think the 2005 bowling attack was much superior. That attack had every base covered in a line and length swing seam bowler new ball bowler in hoggard. Hit the deck pacy stuff in harmison, hit the deck pace reverse swing in Flintoff, full reverse swing with Jones, Giles with his left arm spin and batting. Gough could steam in with the new ball at 90 mph and could clean up the tail in record fashion with his reverse swing.
 
Interesting that Gough states that reverse-swing could be achieved legally, which was something that a lot of the English media wouldn't accept when the 2 Ws were doing it.
 
Interesting that Gough states that reverse-swing could be achieved legally, which was something that a lot of the English media wouldn't accept when the 2 Ws were doing it.

And yet there was the dirt-in-pockets episode in England and the spiking episode in SA.

I think after that they would throw in the ball on the bounce off the wicket to try to rough it up. Cook had the driest hands in the side and would work on drying the ball on one side.
 
I first noticed Darren Gough on the 1990 Pakistan Under-19 tour of England, which I still consider to be the best junior tour that Pakistan has ever arranged.

Gough opened the bowling with Dominic Cork, and John Crawley was the top English batsman.

Pakistan had a similar Test batsman, Zahid Fazal, as well as Ata-ur-Rehman who was a superb young quick and Moin Khan who was already virtually Test class.

Gough’s comments about Younis and Inzy as overseas pros at Yorkshire match exactly what I have previously written about Tendulkar.

Younis was an amazing pro - which is why Bairstow and Root couldn’t conceal their excitement at seeing him again on the 2016 tour. Inzamam and Tendulkar never spent the time that Younis did with the juniors - they never really understood or embraced their role.

I’m a Lancastrian, but freely acknowledge how much Yorkshire’s members appreciated Gillespie, Lehmann and Younis. And how disappointed they were with Inzamam and Tendulkar who just did not have the character or strength of personality to do the job of overseas pro.
 
I first noticed Darren Gough on the 1990 Pakistan Under-19 tour of England, which I still consider to be the best junior tour that Pakistan has ever arranged.

Gough opened the bowling with Dominic Cork, and John Crawley was the top English batsman.

Pakistan had a similar Test batsman, Zahid Fazal, as well as Ata-ur-Rehman who was a superb young quick and Moin Khan who was already virtually Test class.

Gough’s comments about Younis and Inzy as overseas pros at Yorkshire match exactly what I have previously written about Tendulkar.

Younis was an amazing pro - which is why Bairstow and Root couldn’t conceal their excitement at seeing him again on the 2016 tour. Inzamam and Tendulkar never spent the time that Younis did with the juniors - they never really understood or embraced their role.

I’m a Lancastrian, but freely acknowledge how much Yorkshire’s members appreciated Gillespie, Lehmann and Younis. And how disappointed they were with Inzamam and Tendulkar who just did not have the character or strength of personality to do the job of overseas pro.

Sometimes for the old pros County gigs can be one last big pay-day before they retire, and they don't have that hunger or desire they once had.
 
One of the best PP interviews ever, and love the insight, Gough was one of my cricketing heroes growing up and to me he is a legend of the game and arguably England's greatest bowler ever: numbers simply do him no justice. The comment on achieving reverse naturally is interesting but Gough had the perfect bio-mechanical action to generate it. Loved his intent in his playing days, the pace, aggression and movement were all a sight to behold
 
Sometimes for the old pros County gigs can be one last big pay-day before they retire, and they don't have that hunger or desire they once had.

This just proves what we have always known; Younis Khan is and has always been a top fella and team man, extremely honourable, gutsy, hard working and a true professional. A King should be treated accordingly, Pakistan fans and pathetic PCB are the ones to blame for their gutless behaviour towards the leading run scorer in their history, I remember a story of some disrespectful fan getting a slap from him I wish he could do it to all those who speak ill of him, in Pakistan best way to sort it out is by getting the danda out
 
Under 6 foot too.

More proof that you don't have to be 6 foot or more to be a good pace-bowler.
 
Under 6 foot too.

More proof that you don't have to be 6 foot or more to be a good pace-bowler.

To be fair, Gough became half the bowler when his pace deserted him. Shorter bowlers based on what i have seen tend to be most effective when they have pace and swing but are ineffective without the pace
 
Would be great to see Gough in Pakistan again - maybe on a PSL comm role?
 
50 years old today, Happy Birthday Darren Gough!
 
I first noticed Darren Gough on the 1990 Pakistan Under-19 tour of England, which I still consider to be the best junior tour that Pakistan has ever arranged.

Gough opened the bowling with Dominic Cork, and John Crawley was the top English batsman.

Pakistan had a similar Test batsman, Zahid Fazal, as well as Ata-ur-Rehman who was a superb young quick and Moin Khan who was already virtually Test class.

Gough’s comments about Younis and Inzy as overseas pros at Yorkshire match exactly what I have previously written about Tendulkar.

Younis was an amazing pro - which is why Bairstow and Root couldn’t conceal their excitement at seeing him again on the 2016 tour. Inzamam and Tendulkar never spent the time that Younis did with the juniors - they never really understood or embraced their role.

I’m a Lancastrian, but freely acknowledge how much Yorkshire’s members appreciated Gillespie, Lehmann and Younis. And how disappointed they were with Inzamam and Tendulkar who just did not have the character or strength of personality to do the job of overseas pro.

Sachin was Under 20 when he joined Yorkshire.
 
Not even 20 he was 18 and only played a single season.:facepalm
Not surprised that the one who posted this is junaids.

Regardless of if he was 18 years old, as an overseas player he needed to show more warmth towards young talent around him and help them become better persons in life as well as better cricketers.

If he did the above, he wouldn't be so disliked in Yorkshire. I heard from solid sources, passionate Yorkshiremen came up with black flags outside the stadium when Sachin came to attend a world cup game in 2019.

When security guys turned them away, they were visibly agitated and didn't leave the spot before telling as many people around as they could find that quality of bowling in PSL was actually a lot better than in IPL.

As an Indian fan, I take such criticism of our cricket very seriously.
 
If not for cameras, bouncers rule, workloads and helmets , modern era bowlers would have averaged (+3) if they played in that era.
 
Regardless of if he was 18 years old, as an overseas player he needed to show more warmth towards young talent around him and help them become better persons in life as well as better cricketers.

If he did the above, he wouldn't be so disliked in Yorkshire. I heard from solid sources, passionate Yorkshiremen came up with black flags outside the stadium when Sachin came to attend a world cup game in 2019.

When security guys turned them away, they were visibly agitated and didn't leave the spot before telling as many people around as they could find that quality of bowling in PSL was actually a lot better than in IPL.

As an Indian fan, I take such criticism of our cricket very seriously.

who cares about Yorkshire lol? sachin is filthy rich. He can buy Yorkshire if he wants to. I do agree that sacchhu is a massive to*ser. He was always very selfish when he played and he never truly was a team person. He never helped the youngsters develop their game.

In saying that, sachin doesn't need to do anything for Yorkshire. If he won't help out a team mate of his own country then why would he help a pom?
 
Regardless of if he was 18 years old, as an overseas player he needed to show more warmth towards young talent around him and help them become better persons in life as well as better cricketers.

If he did the above, he wouldn't be so disliked in Yorkshire. I heard from solid sources, passionate Yorkshiremen came up with black flags outside the stadium when Sachin came to attend a world cup game in 2019.

When security guys turned them away, they were visibly agitated and didn't leave the spot before telling as many people around as they could find that quality of bowling in PSL was actually a lot better than in IPL.

As an Indian fan, I take such criticism of our cricket very seriously.

Tendulkar was very well liked in Yorkshire, not aware of any hatred at all.

He lived in Solly Adam's bungalow at Wakefield Crescent, Dewsbury which's about an hour's drive from me. Apparently he even went down to some of the Bradford League matches where Adam used to play.

He wasn't bugged incessantly by the public, and he called his time at Yorkshire one of the greatest four and a half months of his life.
 
who cares about Yorkshire lol? sachin is filthy rich. He can buy Yorkshire if he wants to. I do agree that sacchhu is a massive to*ser. He was always very selfish when he played and he never truly was a team person. He never helped the youngsters develop their game.

In saying that, sachin doesn't need to do anything for Yorkshire. If he won't help out a team mate of his own country then why would he help a pom?

Yes, it is a rumour that once Jos Butler had asked Sachin to do a session with him to help improve his technique. Sachin turned his request down and told Jos that instead of talking he should let his bat do the talking.

Luckily in their excitement in 2016, Bairstow and Root told Jos about Younis Khan who was very popular with Yorkshiremen for helping young talent.
 
Yes, it is a rumour that once Jos Butler had asked Sachin to do a session with him to help improve his technique. Sachin turned his request down and told Jos that instead of talking he should let his bat do the talking.

Luckily in their excitement in 2016, Bairstow and Root told Jos about Younis Khan who was very popular with Yorkshiremen for helping young talent.

honestly I wouldn't help a rival player ever. I would only help my team mates. Sacchu never even helped his own buddies though.
 
I first noticed Darren Gough on the 1990 Pakistan Under-19 tour of England, which I still consider to be the best junior tour that Pakistan has ever arranged.

Gough opened the bowling with Dominic Cork, and John Crawley was the top English batsman.

Pakistan had a similar Test batsman, Zahid Fazal, as well as Ata-ur-Rehman who was a superb young quick and Moin Khan who was already virtually Test class.

Gough’s comments about Younis and Inzy as overseas pros at Yorkshire match exactly what I have previously written about Tendulkar.

Younis was an amazing pro - which is why Bairstow and Root couldn’t conceal their excitement at seeing him again on the 2016 tour. Inzamam and Tendulkar never spent the time that Younis did with the juniors - they never really understood or embraced their role.

I’m a Lancastrian, but freely acknowledge how much Yorkshire’s members appreciated Gillespie, Lehmann and Younis. And how disappointed they were with Inzamam and Tendulkar who just did not have the character or strength of personality to do the job of overseas pro.

Isn't Yorkshire the club that deserves to be disbanded?
 
honestly I wouldn't help a rival player ever. I would only help my team mates. Sacchu never even helped his own buddies though.

Sachin was allegedly demoted to #4 in ODIs after Ganguly and John Wright found his conduct with young talent unsatisfactory and not up to mark, at least from someone who had played at Yorkshire once, a county where even 18 year old overseas players were expected to inspire and help other youngsters.

Sachin was promoted to open the innings at 2003 WC after he had openly apologized for his Unyorkshiremen like behaviour and after giving an ice cream treat to all his juniors
 
50 years old today, Happy Birthday Darren Gough!

Happy Brithday to the legend indeed, one of the reasons I got into cricket initially, loved his passion, energy and aggression. Probably the most terrifying England bowler in history
 
The problem was the County season grinding the bowlers down. If England had been able to field Fraser, Caddick, Cork and Gough consistently they would have won a lot of matches.

Then there were Atherton, Stewart, Thorpe, Nasser, Russell and Tufnell who had good careers.

Gough’s test career was over by 2005 anyway. His pace had gone.

Gough could still average about 85mph even by then I had seen him hurry top international batsman and reverse the ball, his fitness you could say something to work on a bit / had a nice break before returning and used in short bursts but England had a suitable / younger replacement in Simon Jones
 
Former England fast bowler Darren Gough has been awarded an MBE for services to cricket in the Queen's Birthday Honours list.
 
London, Former England pace bowler Darren Gough is the frontrunner to take over as the director of cricket at Yorkshire after several high-profile officials, including director of cricket Martyn Moxon and first-team coach Andrew Gale, were sacked in the wake of the cricketer Azeem Rafiq's allegations of institutional racism in the county side.

"Having spent 15 years on the playing staff at Headingley across two spells, the former England fast bowler is understood to be viewed by the new Yorkshire hierarchy, led by chairman Lord (Kamlesh) Patel, as the kind of character the club require as a figurehead," a report in the dailymail.co.uk said on Saturday.

Yorkshire had announced on Friday that the entire coaching staff of the club, including Moxon and Gale will leave the club post the racism allegations made by Rafiq. Moxon had been on leave due to a stress-related illness while Gale had been suspended pending a disciplinary hearing since November 9 on 'historical tweets' made 11 years ago.

"We can confirm that Martyn Moxon, Director of Cricket, and Andrew Gale, First XI Coach, have left the Club (December 3), in addition to all members of the coaching team. A new Director of Cricket will be appointed imminently, alongside a new coaching team which is being recruited. The backroom medical team, external services provided by Pavilion Physiotherapy Clinic, has also left the Club. An interim medical team is also in the process of being appointed," a statement by Lord Patel had said on Friday.

The total departures from the club are 16 and happen after club president Roger Hutton resigned on November 5, and chief executive Mark Arthur stepped down a week later.

"Crucially, perhaps, he (Gough) has an excellent relationship with Azeem Rafiq, the whistleblower whose allegations of institutional racism led to sweeping changes at Yorkshire. The pair both come from Barnsley and Gough offered Rafiq support earlier this year after his revelations came to light. Gough's ability to inspire, as both a unifying force and as one of Yorkshire's most successful internationals, appears to make him the ideal fit despite his lack of experience and time out of the game," said the report.

https://www.timesnownews.com/sports...nner-for-yorkshire-director-of-cricket/837712
 
This could be an excellent appointment.
Goughy is a legend.

Subplot: Gough obviously must have kept his nose clean within the game, not made enemies & have a tidy social media/online footprint as well, otherwise he wouldn’t be in the running!!
 
Hearing that Gough is to be announced as Yorkshire's director of cricket in the next few days.
 
Yorkshire County Cricket Club today announces the appointment of Darren Gough as Managing Director of Yorkshire Cricket on an interim basis, initially until the conclusion of the 2022 season.

Given recent events, the Board has moved to appoint Darren to ensure immediate continuity and stability.

Darren starts his work for the Club today, and he will be relinquishing his media duties.

Working with the Club, one of Darren’s immediate priorities will be overseeing the recruitment of a new coaching team.

Darren Gough said:
“Yorkshire County Cricket Club has been part of my life since my earliest days in cricket when I made my debut in 1989, and I spent 15 happy years at the Club. Like many, I have followed how the Club handled the recent racism allegations with sadness and anger.

“I want to play my part in rebuilding cricket in Yorkshire and I am looking forward to working with the exceptionally talented group of players here. I am also aware of my wider responsibility to listen to everyone and ensure that every person who is associated with this club feels welcome, instilling values we want associated with the White Rose: honesty, straight talking, hard work, integrity and excellence.

“I share Lord Patel’s vision for Yorkshire County Cricket Club, and the collective determination to face the issues head on with a series of positive actions. Change will not happen overnight, but I am certain that we can make Headingley roar again”.

Professor The Lord Patel of Bradford OBE, Chair of Yorkshire County Cricket Club, said:
“We are delighted to welcome Darren back to the Club, and are very happy that he has taken the job.

“As a former Captain of the Club, Darren’s impact on the Yorkshire and England teams was considerable as a player. His infectious enthusiasm and will to win will be so important as we aim to be the best on and off the pitch.

“As we start on this journey with Darren, we want to engage everyone at the Club and involve as many people as possible in shaping our direction. We have a considerable job ahead of us, but we are ready to embrace the opportunity together and build a brighter future for Yorkshire County Cricket Club”.
 
Gouge spoke out about Azeem on his radio show. He has been in touch with him and was at one point really concerned about azeems mental health. I think he has a good relationship with many in the game. Has always been a bubbly character and should be able to do a good job..
 
Good for Goughie. Hope he brings culture change to YCCC.
 
Gough is a legend, i have met him on many occasions, and you can see the sincerity in his eyes when he engages and he comes across as a very genuine guy. Loved watching him bowl back in the day beautiful smooth action, well deserved role now as one of the bigwigs in cricket, people like athers and hussain get the plaudits in the media from that generation because they may have been a bit more articulate etc, but glad to see gough getting his dues.
 
This is such a brilliant move!
Gough is absolutely perfect for the role.
 
This is a top tier appointment and Gough ticks all of the possible boxes you could want

1. White so no allegations of tokenism
2. Respected outside of the game ( one of the few English cricketers who has made it big outside of the cricket).
3. Engaging personality
4. One of the "lads" and accepted by the guys who would usually be part of the "banter" brigade. Its a very low barometer but I reckon Goughie would be able to convince the DM/Sky sports commentators of the problems of racism more so than a Lord Patel or someone who they would call " woke".
5. Seems to have his finger on the pulse about issues like mental health without appearing "woke"
6. Working class Tory

Genuinely pleased that someone like DG is at the helm.

Credibility is critical when talking about highly sensitive issues like this and DG has bags of it.
 
I like Gough on talksport. This appointment means he won’t be on there anymore which is a shame. But great appointment for Yorkshire.
 
BRISBANE: England captain Joe Root welcomed reports Monday that Darren Gough is set to become director of cricket at Yorkshire and said he would work with him to help the troubled club.

British media said ex-England star Gough was on the verge of leaving behind a successful broadcasting career to spearhead Yorkshire's recovery from a damaging racism crisis that has rocked English cricket.

He would replace Martyn Moxon, who left along with the entire Yorkshire coaching staff last week following widespread condemnation of the treatment of former off-spinner Azeem Rafiq.

Rafiq delivered harrowing testimony to British lawmakers last month in which he said his career had been ended by the abuse he received at the English county side.

Long-time Yorkshire player Root, in Brisbane preparing for the opening Ashes Test this week against Australia, said he had not been consulted on Gough.

"I've not heard anything on that, but if that is the case I've obviously spent time with Darren and he's a good man and I'm sure he'll be looking to put his stamp on things at the club," Root said on a zoom call.

"From my experience of spending time with Goughy he is obviously very passionate and knowledgable about the game. His love for it is clear for anyone to see.

"And for the club as well, I'm sure he will be wanting to bring all of that to the fore and all of his experiences and achievements within the game and pass that knowledge onto the group, if it is that he is about to take over."

Root has repeatedly said he cannot recall any instances of racism at Yorkshire, despite Rafiq saying he found his denial "hurtful".

Root on Monday reiterated that he had reached out to new Yorkshire chairman Kamlesh Patel and said that he would pick up the phone if Gough -- who spent 14 years as a player at the club -- called to ask for his help.

"Absolutely," he said. "As I say, I want to do everything I can to help move the club forward. I would welcome any of those phones calls. I've already reached out to Lord Patel and if Gough was to call, absolutely."

Last month, the England and Wales Cricket Board unveiled a 12-point action plan to combat discrimination in the sport, including a review of dressing-room culture.

https://www.brecorder.com/news/40138058/root-welcomes-gough-reports-eager-to-help-troubled-yorkshire
 
<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Brought back wonderful memories of visiting Lahore with <a href="https://twitter.com/englandcricket?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@englandcricket</a> <br>Here this time with <a href="https://twitter.com/YorkshireCCC?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@YorkshireCCC</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/lahoreqalandars?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@lahoreqalandars</a> watching the player development programme <a href="https://t.co/koLUboIIQb">pic.twitter.com/koLUboIIQb</a></p>— Darren Gough MBE (@DGoughie) <a href="https://twitter.com/DGoughie/status/1526511325156974597?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 17, 2022</a></blockquote>
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The Yorkshire County Cricket Club (YCCC) can confirm that Darren Gough has stepped down from his role as Managing Director of Cricket.

Gough came into the role in December 2021 following a very difficult period for the Club and has gone on to shape a young and exciting squad. The former Yorkshire and England fast bowler has overseen positive developments in the pathways, recruited a number of excellent support staff and steered the group through some turbulent times.

Gough, said: “It’s been an absolute honour to work for my boyhood Club over the last two seasons.

“Having stepped in at a very challenging time, we’ve worked hard to steady the ship and develop our cricket department to ensure we can return to the top tier of English cricket.

“In my time here, we have achieved a great deal that I am proud of. The men’s squad has been totally rebuilt with significant improvements behind the scenes across all support areas. This has put both the men’s team and the Northern Diamonds in a much better place to be able to compete going forward.

“The performance pathway is thriving and continues to lead the way nationally, and there is a real energy around what is happening with the Women’s game and the next few years will be transformational I’m sure.

“Following conversations with the Club, I have decided now is the right time to step away from my role and give someone else an opportunity to take our playing squads forward. I’d like to thank all of our players, staff, members and fans for their considerable support over the last few seasons and wish them all the very best for the coming year.

“I will always be a Yorkshire Cricket supporter and look forward to returning to watch our teams in the coming years”.

Stephen Vaughan, Chief Executive Officer for YCCC, said: “It’s been an absolute pleasure to work with Darren since taking on this role.

“The contribution he has made to stabilise the Club and drive our playing squads forward has been critical and, I know that, as a Yorkshireman who lives and breathes this Club, he has been so proud to carry out the role.

“The work that Darren has done over the last two seasons has built some fantastic foundations and we are very grateful for his time, commitment and the manner in which he has set about his role”.

Colin Graves, Chair of YCCC, said: “I’d like to express our sincere thanks to Darren for the work he has put in over the last few seasons.

“Darren is a Club legend in his own right, having enjoyed two very successful stints as a player here and now helped us through some very difficult times in his role as Managing Director of Cricket.

“Everyone at the Club would like to wish him all the best for the future, and we look forward to welcoming him back to Headingley again soon”.

With the cricketing landscape changing rapidly, including the ongoing tender process to apply for a Tier 1 women’s professional team, the Club will now take some time to consider the best structure for the cricket department that will put YCCC in the best position to continue to lead the way on and off the field.

SOURCE: https://yorkshireccc.com/news/darren-gough-steps-down-from-role-as-managing-director-of-cricket/
 
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