What will be Boris Johnson's legacy in British politics and the world stage?

What will be Boris Johnson's legacy in British politics and the world stage?

  • The best British PM ever

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  • No better or worse than other British PMs

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As Boris Johnson leaves Downing Street less than three years after he became prime minister, what legacy is he leaving behind for the Conservative Party and the country?

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Boris Johnson’s supporters last week championed his legacy as a bullish enforcer of the British people’s will against European technocrats.

The reality of his diplomatic record over six years in office, first at the foreign office and then at 10 Downing Street, is rather different. Negotiators in Brussels found the old Etonian more malleable than they had expected.

For all that Johnson took credit for “getting Brexit done” after the difficult Theresa May years, it was clear to those sitting across the negotiating table in Brussels that the key British negotiators preferred to keep the prime minister at a distance from the actual talks.

When Johnson spoke to his European Commission counterparts, president Ursula von der Leyen or her predecessor Jean-Claude Juncker, it usually led to nothing more than rhetorical encouragement to crack on with finding a deal.

But it could also, to the visible distress of his own negotiators, lead to a sudden change in British positions: Johnson would suddenly pivot to accept EU arguments, driving a coach and horses through his own team’s position.

One big moment was in October 2019, recalled Georg Riekeles, diplomatic adviser to the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier. Johnson had ousted Theresa May on the promise that he would rip up her famous “backstop” arrangements for avoiding a border on the island of Ireland.

But as prime minister Johnson was now floundering in finding an alternative, and parliament would not let him leave the EU without a deal. Johnson met with the Irish taoiseach Leo Varadkar in the Wirral – and folded. Johnson illustrated the political flexibility – or lack of principle – that was both his great strength and weakness as a politician.

Varadkar called back to the commission to debrief Barnier and his team and told them that Johnson understood that there had to be a regulatory border down the Irish Sea to avoid one on the island of Ireland.

“In a way [Johnson’s Brexit negotiator David] Frost learned his lesson from that moment,” Riekeles said. “You should never let EU negotiators at any level get direct access to Johnson again. Because that is very much what we saw for the rest of the negotiations. Johnson was at once both uncontrollable and at the same time controlled.”

Leading figures of the leave campaign had vowed that after the 2016 vote they would leave Brussels to one side and go straight to Berlin or Paris to negotiate a new arrangement. EU leaders rejected such advances from the outset. But Johnson proved a particularly ill-fitting choice to lead such a strategy.

A clash of political styles was visually on display when Johnson met his German foreign minister counterpart Frank-Walter Steinmeier in Berlin in November 2016. At a joint press conference, the Tory politician tried to greet the Social Democrat with a fist bump. Steinmeier, who had previously described Johnson as “irresponsible”, replied with a half-hearted and awkward fist-shake.

Johnson and his team alienated Angela Merkel when in October 2019 they briefed British journalists about a confidential phone call in which the two leaders had failed to avert a looming no-deal British exit from the EU.

A No 10 source claimed Merkel had demanded that Northern Ireland remain in a customs union with the EU “for ever”, triggering a wave of anti-German sentiment in the British press. Relations between Merkel and Johnson never recovered.

The Élysée, too, will not be sorry to see the back of the outgoing British prime minister. French president Emmanuel Macron was furious at what he saw as a betrayal by an ally over Britain’s participation in the Aukus debacle, when in 2021 Australia announced it was cancelling a multibillion-dollar contract to buy French submarines for a new alliance with the UK and US.

The cross-Channel mood was not improved by Johnson’s saying French officials angry at the deal needed to “prenez un grip”, adding “Donnez-moi un break”, seen as another example of Johnson’s lack of seriousness.

Macron was also said to be irked at Johnson’s habit of clowning around and adopting a wild-west-style gunfighter’s pose whenever the pair met at international events.

Even then, there were moments that in hindsight looked like opportunities for a reset of diplomatic relations.

Jens Zimmermann, the chair of the Bundestag’s German-British parliamentary group, was part of a delegation of politicians who met Johnson as part of the then German foreign minister Heiko Maas’s inaugural visit on 12 April 2018.

At the time, the recent poisoning of former British-Russian double agent Sergei Skripal in Salisbury was dominating the agenda, and the meeting was moved from Oxford University to the Brize Norton airbase.

“You could tell he was in his element, performing in front of the press,” recalled Zimmermann, a party ally of the German chancellor, Olaf Scholz.

“But in that moment there was also a real sense of closeness and solidarity. We didn’t just stand shoulder to shoulder for the cameras.”

Over Ukraine, too, Johnson and European leaders found much common ground. At the beginning of March, Johnson took time to meet German, Spanish and Italian journalists to elaborate on Britain’s stance over Ukraine.

“You got a glimpse of the friendly and approachable Johnson that Conservative supporters were once so excited about,” said Die Welt’s London correspondent Stefanie Bolzen. “On so many domestic issues Johnson zig-zagged all over the place – but on Ukraine his position was solid and unshakable.”

Yet in Johnson’s repeated trips to Kyiv, and the sometimes careless rhetoric of some of his ministers towards the UK’s supposed continental allies, many European diplomats sensed an element of oneupmanship that undermined rather than strengthened their joint stance.

“Whenever we managed to find a common ground over security issues, there was always a moment soon after that left you with the feeling that Johnson was happy to sacrifice bilateral relations for domestic gain,” Zimmermann said.

https://www.theguardian.com/politic...s-johnson-will-be-remembered-in-europe-brexit
 
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Unbelievably corrosive.

A man who laid UK low with his thin Brexit deal, imperilled the NI Peace Process, failed to save 20K lives from COVID by tardiness in applying lockdown and then opening the care home at Christmas, misled the Queen, illegally prorogued Parliament, trashed our international reputation for reliability, failed to uphold the Ministerial Code causing a collapse in standards in public life, and lied, and lied, and lied.

The worst PM of my life by a very long way, and possibly the worst of all time.
 
He upheld the will of the people and got Brexit done. Responsible for rolling out the Covid vaccine faster than any country in the world with exception of Isreal. The best, if not, the greatest Political campaigner British politics has ever seen.
 
He upheld the will of the people and got Brexit done. Responsible for rolling out the Covid vaccine faster than any country in the world with exception of Isreal. The best, if not, the greatest Political campaigner British politics has ever seen.

Sorry these 13 years of tory rule has destroyed Britain.

Bojo was the biggest cheerleader of the ukraine war and his support will accelerate the destruction of the eu and western European economies wait till winter when the energy disaster is laid bare for all.
 
This is a poll - add your votes folks.
 
Sorry these 13 years of tory rule has destroyed Britain.

Bojo was the biggest cheerleader of the ukraine war and his support will accelerate the destruction of the eu and western European economies wait till winter when the energy disaster is laid bare for all.

What’s the last 13 years got to do with anything? We’re talking about the tenure of Boris which was about 3 years.
 
Bojo was the biggest cheerleader of the ukraine war

To be fair, any UK PM after Chamberlain would have done the same. Bodge didn’t do anything they all wouldn’t have done.

But he did go off-piste as Foreign Secretary and meet an ex-KGB Colonel - a resignation issue for any Minister - and then promoted the ex-Colonel’s son to the House of Lords.
 
Appalling, but the world's best leader on Ukraine.

My vote for Truss is conditional upon her continuing to support and arm Ukraine.
 
Appalling, but the world's best leader on Ukraine.

My vote for Truss is conditional upon her continuing to support and arm Ukraine.

Why do you want continuation of arming Ukraine? It is prolonging the war. It is causing more deaths. It is causing food shortage and energy crisis.
 
God help us. War mongerer Truss is the new MP, and we have the fake convicts jumping on the bandwagon.
 
Sorry these 13 years of tory rule has destroyed Britain.

Bojo was the biggest cheerleader of the ukraine war and his support will accelerate the destruction of the eu and western European economies wait till winter when the energy disaster is laid bare for all.

Definitely agree with the 13 year conservative demolition of the united kingdom.
 
Lizz Truss the new PM. Voted in by a margin of 21000. Closer than what polls were suggesting.

Rumour is that 13 Tory MPs will submit a vote of no confidence; a ploy to get Boris back?

New era folks.
 
Appalling, but the world's best leader on Ukraine.

My vote for Truss is conditional upon her continuing to support and arm Ukraine.

Lol support and arm Ukraine, sounds like blood thirsty white nazis
 
Unbelievably corrosive.

A man who laid UK low with his thin Brexit deal, imperilled the NI Peace Process, failed to save 20K lives from COVID by tardiness in applying lockdown and then opening the care home at Christmas, misled the Queen, illegally prorogued Parliament, trashed our international reputation for reliability, failed to uphold the Ministerial Code causing a collapse in standards in public life, and lied, and lied, and lied.

The worst PM of my life by a very long way, and possibly the worst of all time.

He was an absolute joke and mentally deformed a lot like most of his most loyal supporters. The pandering to Ukraine for his own needs is unforgivable or his antics while the population suffered, if there was positive it would be he helped us move forward with Brexit and while it’s through no consequence of his own and more down to how thick and stupid he is, he didn’t keep us in lockdown longer then required.
 
Boris Johnson has delivered his valedictory speech to the nation, describing himself as a "booster rocket that has fulfilled its function".

Speaking outside a packed Downing Street, the outgoing prime minister said: "This is it folks."

Mr Johnson vowed to "get behind Liz Truss every step of the way" and told the Conservative Party that "it is time to get behind" the new prime minister.

He championed his administration's achievements, highlighting Brexit, the vaccine rollout and the response to the war in Ukraine.

He blamed President Putin for spiralling energy costs and said he knows Ms Truss and her government "will do everything they can to get through this crisis".

Hinting at what he plans to do next, Mr Johnson said: "On the subject of bouncing around in future careers, let me say that I am now like one of those booster rockets that has fulfilled its function.

"And I will now be gently re-entering the atmosphere and splashing down invisibly in some remote and obscure corner of the Pacific."

Referencing how he was ousted, Mr Johnson jibed that in this "relay race" of government they "changed the rules half way through".

But he said that if Dilyn, the Johnsons' dog, and Larry the No 10 cat "can put behind them their occasional difficulties, then so can the Conservative Party".

He went on to compare himself to Cincinnatus, a Roman statesman who resigned and returned to his farm.

"Like Cincinnatus, I am returning to my plough and I will be offering this government nothing but the most fervent support," Mr Johnson said.

According to tradition, Cincinnatus later returned to serve a second term.

'Completely deluded'

Speaking to Sky News after Mr Johnson left Downing Street for the final time, Angela Rayner, the Labour deputy leader, said it was a "classic Boris Johnson speech" that was "completely deluded about what's happened over the last couple of years and the crisis that people are facing".

She said there was no acknowledgement of "the scandal and sleaze that has engulfed his party and his government over the last couple of years".

Ms Rayner added: "Whether that was him supporting the scandal around Owen Paterson or supporting Chris Pincher with the situation with sexual harassment, whether it was the absolute billions of pounds that was wasted on money that was given to mates through the global pandemic.

"And, of course, the partying that happened when the UK public were told that they had to go into lockdown and had to follow the rules.

"I think it was completely deluded and it stunk of all the hallmarks of somebody who's had a privileged background, who thinks that they can just do what they like."

'Admired from Kyiv to Carlisle'

Mr Johnson was forced to resign after a wave of ministers left his government over a series of controversies, culminating in the Chris Pincher scandal.

There has been speculation that he will be defiant and plot a Trump-style comeback from the backbenches.

After delivering his farewell speech, the outgoing prime minister flew to Balmoral in Scotland to formally tender his resignation to the Queen before Ms Truss's arrival.

Ms Truss was declared the winner of the Conservative leadership race on Monday and has now been confirmed as party leader and prime minister.

On Monday she praised "my friend" Mr Johnson in her victory speech.

"Boris, you got Brexit done, you crushed Jeremy Corbyn, you rolled out the vaccine and you stood up to Vladimir Putin. You are admired from Kyiv to Carlisle," she said.

SKY
 
He was an absolute joke and mentally deformed a lot like most of his most loyal supporters. The pandering to Ukraine for his own needs is unforgivable or his antics while the population suffered, if there was positive it would be he helped us move forward with Brexit and while it’s through no consequence of his own and more down to how thick and stupid he is, he didn’t keep us in lockdown longer then required.

To be fair to Bodge, every 🇬🇧 PM you could name would have taken the same stance on Ukraine.

But 20,000 Britons too many died from COVID because he skipped those COBRA meetings, dithered and locked us down too late. He could have saved them with more decisive action but chose the populist path instead.
 
Boris Johnson has said Vladimir Putin threatened him with a missile strike in an "extraordinary" phone call in the run-up to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

The then-prime minister said Mr Putin told him it "would only take a minute".

Mr Johnson said the comment was made after he warned the war would be an "utter catastrophe" during a "very long" call in February 2022.

Details of the exchange are revealed in a BBC documentary, examining Mr Putin's interactions with world leaders.

Mr Johnson warned Mr Putin that invading Ukraine would lead to Western sanctions and more Nato troops on Russia's borders.

He also tried to deter Russian military action by telling Mr Putin that Ukraine would not join Nato "for the foreseeable future".

But Mr Johnson said: "He threatened me at one point, and he said, 'Boris, I don't want to hurt you but, with a missile, it would only take a minute' or something like that. Jolly.

"But I think from the very relaxed tone that he was taking, the sort of air of detachment that he seemed to have, he was just playing along with my attempts to get him to negotiate."

BBC
 
Boris Johnson's future is in the balance as he is set to give evidence to MPs investigating whether he misled parliament over partygate denials.

The former prime minister will appear before the cross-party privileges committee at 2pm on Wednesday for a session of questioning that is due to last four hours - but could be longer.

https://news.sky.com/story/boris-jo...s-to-quiz-him-over-partygate-denials-12839829
 
He's cultivated the rise of British Hindu politicians to be fair. Rishi, Suella, Priti just to name the most prominent. Will the British public ever truly believe in their sincerity considering we don't actually know what they stand for?
 
He's cultivated the rise of British Hindu politicians to be fair. Rishi, Suella, Priti just to name the most prominent. Will the British public ever truly believe in their sincerity considering we don't actually know what they stand for?

Then you should also know what British public actually thinks about British muslim politicians and what they stand for? Though for a normal white Brit, they would always want a white guy as their leader and its natural but if its a choice between a Rishi Sunak and Sadiq Khan, there is always a clear winner. This is not even a debate. You are looking at British public from a Pakistani eye and generalizing it. Not many has problem with hindus in this country, a community by large considered as law abiding and peaceful. The compare it with muslim community which is considered as the most nuisence and trouble makers. I live in central London and well aware of ground realities. You see, there is much more in Britain than Bradford :p
 
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2...on-at-10-biography-interview?CMP=share_btn_tw

Some quotes from the piece:

Of the 57 people who have held the highest office, Seldon suggests, Johnson was probably unique in that he came to it with “no sense of any fixed position. No religious faith, no political ideology”. His only discernible ambition, Seldon says, was that “like Roman emperors he wanted monuments in his name”.

“To those many people who say, ‘Of course he believed in Brexit’, the evidence is absolutely clear,” Seldon says. “From the beginning it was striking that he believed that there was a cause far higher than Britain’s economic interests, than Britain’s relationship with Europe, than Britain’s place in the world, than the strength of the union. That cause was his own advancement.”

"His examples were always for show. At his heart, he is extraordinarily empty. He can’t keep faithful to any idea, any person, any wife.”

From a review of Anthony Seldon and Raymond Newel's new book - Johnson at 10 - see: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2...g-with-the-pm-who-would-be-king-boris-johnson

The first three paragraphs of the article:

If the reign of Bad King Boris looked dreadful from the outside, it was even more diabolical viewed from the inside. This is an authoritative, gripping and often jaw-dropping account of the bedlam behind the black door of Number 10 and it confirms that we did not really have a government during his trashy reign. It was an anarchy presided over by a fervently frivolous, frantically floundering and deeply decadent lord of misrule.

As Anthony Seldon and Raymond Newell relate it, never in modern times has the premiership been occupied by someone so fundamentally unfit to hold the office. That may not be a wholly original observation, but the great merit of their account is the weight of evidence they marshal to support the contention that Johnson was an utterly incapable prime minister. The authors say they have gathered testimony from more than 200 witnesses, a lot of them officials and aides, “the silent voices of those who will never publish memoirs and diaries”. While this necessarily means that a lot of the sourcing is anonymous, it all rings horribly true.

During one of many episodes of derangement in Downing Street, Johnson is to be found raving: “I am meant to be in control. I am the führer. I’m the king who takes the decisions.” The would-be great dictator was never in control because he was incapable of performing even some of the most basic functions of a leader.
 
Boris Johnson has been referred to the police by the Cabinet Office over new claims he broke COVID lockdown rules.

The former prime minister's ministerial diary has revealed visits by friends to Chequers during the pandemic.

The trips to the country residence were highlighted during preparations for a public inquiry into COVID.

Politics Live: Boris Johnson's diary shows friends visiting him at Chequers during lockdown

The Cabinet Office has passed concerns to the Metropolitan Police and Thames Valley Police.

The privileges committee, which is investigating claims Mr Johnson misled parliament over partygate, has also been informed, according to The Times which first reported on the story.

The news has sparked calls for Mr Johnson to step down as an MP.

But sources close to him called the referral "clearly politically motivated" and claimed the Cabinet Office did not give him any notice "so he could put forward the facts before the report was made".

Mr Johnson has been advised by lawyers that the events were lawful.

A spokesperson for Mr Johnson said: "Some abbreviated entries in Mr Johnson's official diary were queried by Cabinet Office during preparation for the COVID Inquiry.

"Following an examination of the entries, Mr Johnson's lawyers wrote to the Cabinet Office and privileges committee explaining that the events were lawful and were not breaches of any COVID regulations."

Police are currently "assessing" concerns, but a formal investigation has not yet been launched.

A statement from the Metropolitan Police said the details were passed to them on 19 May and they relate "to potential breaches of the Health Protection Regulations between June 2020 and May 2021 at Downing Street".

A Cabinet Office spokesperson said: "Information came to light during the process of preparing evidence for submission to the COVID Inquiry.

"It was identified as part of the normal disclosure review of potentially relevant documents being undertaken by the legal team for inquiry witnesses.

"In line with obligations in the Civil Service Code, this material has been passed to the relevant authorities and it is now a matter for them."

Johnson 'should consider his position as MP'

The Liberal Democrats have called for Mr Johnson to consider his position as an MP.

Deputy leader Daisy Cooper said: "It's outrageous that rumours of alleged rule breaking by Boris Johnson are still being drip-fed to the public.

"The fact that it's one rule for them and one rule for the rest of us still triggers a raw sense of injustice in millions of people.

"Sunak must make sure that not a single penny more of taxpayer money is spent on Johnson's legal fund; and Johnson should finally do one decent thing and consider his position as an MP."

SKY
 
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Boris Johnson has insisted fresh claims he broke lockdown rules are "total nonsense" and that elements of his ministerial diary were "cherry-picked and handed to police".

The former prime minister was confronted by Sky News about the allegations as he made his way through the Dulles International Airport in Washington following a brief tour of the US.

Asked if he broke the rules he told Sky's US correspondent James Matthews: "This whole thing is a load of nonsense from beginning to end.

"I think it's ridiculous that elements in my diary should be cherry-picked and handed over to the police, to the privileges committee without even anybody having the basic common sense to ask me what these entries referred to."

Mr Johnson was referred to the police by the Cabinet Office on Wednesday over events in Chequers and Downing Street following a review of his official diary as part of the official COVID inquiry.

Pressed on whether the entries showed him "mingling with friends", Mr Johnson insisted "that is absolutely not what these diary entries show".

He said: "I just think it's totally nonsensical and bizarre that there are tens of thousands of entries in the prime minister's diary. I've never seen these things before.

"I have looked through it. None of them constitute a breach of the rules during COVID, they weren't during lockdown.

"They were during other periods of the restrictions. None of them constitute a breach of the rules. None of them involve socialising. It is total nonsense."

Mr Johnson has previously said he believes he is the victim of a "politically motivated stitch-up" and ditched the government-appointed lawyers representing him in the COVID-19 public inquiry following his police referral.

He would not be drawn on who was "stitching him up" but said: "Someone somewhere thinks it's sensible to do this. I don't."

However a Labour source said: "If Boris Johnson is confident he has acted with proprietary, then he has nothing to fear from scrutiny."

Mr Johnson has already been fined by the Met Police for breaking lockdown rules and is currently being investigated by the privileges committee over whether he lied to parliament over his repeated partygate denials.

On Friday night the committee confirmed it had received new evidence from the government and had written to Mr Johnson for a response.

A spokesperson said: "The committee will take this evidence and Mr Johnson's response into account when considering its final report. The committee is making progress with its inquiry expeditiously."

The latest developments have turned attention back again to the partygate controversy which played a major role in the former prime minister's downfall.

He was in the US on Wednesday when the news broke and during his tour met former president Donald Trump.

Earlier on Friday, Mr Johnson's spokesperson said the purpose of this was "to discuss the situation in Ukraine and the vital importance of Ukrainian victory".

It is not clear where the meeting took place, but during his US visit Mr Johnson stopped off in both Texas and Las Vegas.

The two leaders have known each other for many years and worked together when Mr Trump was US president and Mr Johnson was in charge at Downing Street.

Mr Trump has spoken highly of Mr Johnson and earlier this month called him a "wonderful guy" and "a friend of mine".

The two have previously been aligned on policy issues, such as Brexit, but they have also diverged in recent years, most notably on Ukraine.

Mr Johnson was still prime minister when Russia invaded its southern neighbour last February and was a leader in helping rally international support for the Ukrainian people and its military.

Meanwhile Mr Trump - who has touted his "very good relationship" with Russian President Vladimir Putin - has something of a chequered history involving Ukraine, dating back to before Moscow's invasion last year.

In September 2019, reports emerged he had asked Ukraine's President Zelenskyy to investigate then former vice president Joe Biden, who was expected to run against him in the 2020 presidential election.

That phone call led to Mr Trump's first impeachment on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of congress - but he was not convicted after a trial in the senate.

Earlier this month, in a town hall conversation broadcast as part of his 2024 presidential campaign, Mr Trump - who is running to be the Republican candidate again - refused to say who he thinks should prevail and said he'd end the war in just 24 hours.

He said: "I want everybody to stop dying. They're dying. Russians and Ukrainians. I want them to stop dying. And I'll have that done in 24 hours."

SKY
 
BREAKING: Boris Johnson has announced he is standing down as an MP with immediate effect.
 
Blimey. This is a report - in breadth and depth - that demolishes Boris Johnson's character and conduct.

Let's be blunt: it says he lied.

The spine of the biography of Boris Johnson has his relationship with the truth running straight down it.

Sacked from The Times for making up a quote, when he was a young reporter. Sacked from the Conservative front bench for lying about an affair.

Just 40 weeks ago, Mr Johnson was prime minister, the figurehead of a government with a big majority.

Catapulted first to the backbenches and now out of Parliament too, the demolition of Mr Johnson's career by his own peers has been brutally quick.Live: Johnson would face 90-day suspension over Partygate if still an MP

Live: Boris Johnson would be facing 90-day suspension if still an MP
Remember, today isn't about parties during Covid.

It is about the fundamental pillars upon which public life - and society at large - is constructed.

Conduct.

Behaviour.

Believability.

Integrity.

The sanctity of truth. The contempt for lies.

A committee of MPs, four Conservatives and three others, tasked with delivering their verdict. Those committee members could never have imagined finding themselves at the centre of an inquiry of such gravity.

Many are not widely known names.

I don't say that to deprecate or belittle them for a second, but to emphasise the power of Parliament.

A power Boris Johnson is feeling today like never before.

The crux of Mr Johnson's defence is this was cock up, not conspiracy.

That however forensic and conscientious this committee, how could it crawl into the mind of Mr Johnson to understand his intent?

It tried to do the former and claims to have managed to have done the latter.

"The committee now says that I deliberately misled the House, and at the moment I spoke I was consciously concealing from the House my knowledge of illicit events. This is rubbish. It is a lie," he claims.

One former cabinet minister I was talking to said - hoped - that "ex MPs become very ex very quickly".

They added, from reading the Tory MP WhatsApp groups and public statements in recent days, that Boris Johnson has only a shrivelled rump of parliamentary support.

But others will wonder if this report - as punishingly brutal as it is - may motivate a martyrdom, may rally support.

"Spiteful, vindictive and overreaching" is the verdict of one Boris Johnson supporter on the Tory backbenches, Brendan Clarke-Smith.

One minister said to me: "Boris is the sort of bloke who could fall down a manhole head first and still land on his feet."

But this is one heck of a manhole.
 
Boris Johnson would have faced a 90-day suspension if he was still an MP, after an inquiry found he deliberately misled Parliament over lockdown parties.

In a damning report, the Privileges Committee said the former PM had committed repeated offences with his Partygate denials.

The suspension would have potentially triggered a by-election to replace him, had Mr Johnson not already stood down last week after seeing the findings.

He called their conclusions "deranged".

In a blistering statement, he branded the committee a "kangaroo court" and claimed its year-long inquiry had delivered "what is intended to be the final knife-thrust in a protracted political assassination".

Mr Johnson - who helped the Conservative Party win a landslide election victory under his leadership only three years ago - is the first former prime minister to have been found to have deliberately misled Parliament.

It has been confirmed a by-election to replace him in his Uxbridge and South Ruislip constituency will take place on 20 July.

On the same day, voters will also elect a replacement for Johnson ally Nigel Adams, who also stood down as MP for Selby and Ainsty in the wake of the former PM's resignation.
 
He's cultivated the rise of British Hindu politicians to be fair. Rishi, Suella, Priti just to name the most prominent. Will the British public ever truly believe in their sincerity considering we don't actually know what they stand for?

This quote needs revisiting.
 
A clown. His own party look at him that way, outside the Indian World Order
 
Former Prime Minister Boris Johnson has signed up to join TV channel GB News.

Johnson, who stepped down as an MP earlier this year, will work for the news channel as a presenter, programme maker and commentator.

He will "play a key role" in coverage of the UK and US elections next year and will host a series "showcasing the power of Britain around the world", the broadcaster said.

He promised to share his "unvarnished views" on a range of topics.

Johnson, who also writes a column for the Daily Mail, will start in the new year.

He is the latest Conservative politician to join the broadcaster, following former Business Secretary Jacob Rees-Mogg, party deputy chairman Lee Anderson, and husband-and-wife MPs Esther McVey and Philip Davies.

In a video posted on X, formerly Twitter, the former PM said: "I am excited to say that I am shortly going to be joining you on GB News.

"I'm going to be giving this remarkable new TV channel my unvarnished views on everything from Russia, China, the war in Ukraine, how we meet all those challenges."

In a statement, he added: "I will be talking about the immense opportunities for Global Britain - as well as the challenges - and why our best days are yet to come."

Johnson resigned as prime minister in 2022, following a mass revolt by ministers over his leadership.

This summer, he stood down as MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip in protest after Parliament's privileges committee found he had deliberately misled the House of Commons over Covid breaches in Downing Street during lockdown.

Subject to conditions
Johnson's actions and decision making as prime minister during the pandemic are currently being investigated as part of the ongoing Covid enquiry.

Former ministers are required to seek advice from the independent Advisory Committee on Business Appointments (Acoba) about any employment they wish to take up within two years of leaving office.

After being approached by Johnson, the committee said the role with GB News did not "raise any particular concerns under the government rules".

However, it said Johnson should be subject to a number of conditions, including not drawing on any privileged material from his time in office and not being personally involved in lobbying the government on behalf of GB News for two years from the date he stepped down as prime minister.

Earlier this year, Acoba said Johnson had committed an "unambiguous breach" of the ministerial code by not clearing his Daily Mail job with the committee.

Ratings winner?
Johnson earned £4.8m in five months after leaving office as PM, mostly for speaking at events and for securing a deal to write a memoir.

He becomes the latest big name to join GB News and follows comedian and actor John Cleese, whose 10-part current affairs series is due to begin on Sunday.

Johnson is expected to give the news channel a ratings boost after a turbulent period.

Two presenters, Laurence Fox and Calvin Robinson, were sacked earlier this month in the wake of an outcry about Fox's on-air comments about a female journalist, while fellow host Dan Wootton remains suspended.

Media regulator Ofcom received more than 8,800 complaints and is investigating. That is one of 12 current Ofcom investigations into GB News.

There is also a debate about whether politicans should be allowed to host news programmes.

Last month, Davies and McVey's GB News show was found to have broken Ofcom rules because their interview with the chancellor failed to include an "appropriately wide range of significant views".

Source: BBC
 
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