Stuart Broad's Father Saved My Life, Says Umpire Ahsan Raza

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Stuart Broad's father saved my life, says umpire shot by terrorists

Ahsan Raza will not be lenient with the England paceman Stuart Broad, despite the debt to his dad in terrifying Lahore attack

Andy Wilson in Dubai
guardian.co.uk, Friday 13 January 2012 23.01 GMT

Stuart Broad's father, Chris, laid on top of Ashan Raza to stop the umpire losing blood after being shot twice. Photograph: Gareth Copley/Getty Images

For Ahsan Raza, one of the umpires in England's match against the Pakistan Board XI who will also be involved in the internationals to come over the next few weeks, the sight of Stuart Broad in the pavilion had a special significance. "His father saved my life," Raza reflected matter of factly.

The 37-year-old father of three had been travelling with Chris Broad, the former England opener who is now an International Cricket Council match referee, to officiate at his first Test between Pakistan and Sri Lanka in his home city of Lahore when their bus came under attack from terrorists in the 2009 incident that drove this series to the desert.

"I was hit by two bullets, one in my lung," Raza said. "I was saved by two things. One, I put an ICC handbook, with all the rules and regulations, in front of my stomach." But one of the bullets still penetrated, as he shows by lifting his shirt to reveal a lengthy scar down his front. "I give credit to Chris Broad as well. He was crying at first, everybody in the bus was crying. But then there was a pin-drop silence everywhere, and he suddenly realised that someone – me – was lying dying and my blood was pumping full speed. He lay down on me to try to stop the flow. I just asked my Allah, please save my life for my kids, three small daughters – that was all."

Raza was in a coma for three days, and remained in intensive care for 27. One of his lungs was damaged beyond repair. But within eight months he had been appointed television umpire for the final of Pakistan's domestic Twenty20 competition. Shortly after that he travelled to Dubai for a one-day international between Pakistan and New Zealand, one of the first games that was relocated to the United Arab Emirates as a result of the Lahore shooting. "My first day driving to the ground here in Dubai, I turned to my match referee Andy Pycroft, and said: 'Where is the security? There was fear in my mind," Raza said. "Andy said: 'There's nothing, everything is fine here.' And after that I didn't feel anything. I feel safe anywhere now."

That includes Pakistan, Raza having refused the opportunity to move to the UK – where he had played for Kingstonians in Surrey and Motherwell in Scotland as a wicketkeeper-batsman. Broad had even offered to support his application for a visa. "But Pakistan is the land of my forefathers, I love it," he said. "And I tell you, it is fine now, things have changed. There are some places up in the hills, maybe, but in Karachi, Lahore, Faisalabad, the cities, you can play cricket easy. They have played games with 20,000 crowds and no problem. I have always said it is my dream to umpire in international cricket, so now that dream is for international cricket to go back to Pakistan, where the people love cricket so much. I hope it can happen soon."

Bangladesh are considering an offer to make a short tour in April and MCC is also planning to send a team of volunteers. As for Raza, he sees his appointment as fourth umpire for the first two Tests of England's series, then as one of the standing umpires for the first one-day international on 13 February, as a significant step towards his goal of joining his old friend Aleem Dar on the ICC's elite panel.

"I achieved one dream in 2010 when I was at Lord's as the TV umpire for the Test between Pakistan and Australia," he said. "Chris Broad was my match referee that day too and he said to me: 'I don't want to see you in that chair here again, I want to see you out on the ground.' That was a wonderful thing to say, and I have remembered it."

As for Broad Jr, who was rested from this match? "I did raise a hand to him when I saw him in the distance but I'm not sure he saw and maybe he doesn't know. That is good, because we know as an umpire, the cricketer cannot be our friend." So there will be no favours for Broad from Raza in the one‑day series, even if his father did save his life that terrifying morning in Lahore three years ago.

Link: http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2012/jan/13/stuart-broad-umpire-terrorists?newsfeed=true

Comments: I had read many read many disturbing things on Chris Broads history both as a player and match refree wrt his bias and prejudice against Asian players, teams but its the truth that the best time to judge a person is simply by his actions and not his words.

Definately all negative perceptions of Chris Broad have been considerably removed from my side atleast.
 
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Kudos to Broad Snr and big respect but still not a fan as far as his umpiring is concerned.
 
The apple seems to have fallen far away from the tree.

I think Broad Jnr would have reacted in the same manner as Broad Snr. You can't really say how people will react in a life threatening situation, but most people will surprise you and help out their fellow man.
 
Respect for Chris Broad.

Shame I can't say the same for that son of his.
 
Stuart Broad's father saved my life, says umpire shot by terrorists

Ahsan Raza will not be lenient with the England paceman Stuart Broad, despite the debt to his dad in terrifying Lahore attack

Andy Wilson in Dubai
guardian.co.uk, Friday 13 January 2012 23.01 GMT

Stuart Broad's father, Chris, laid on top of Ashan Raza to stop the umpire losing blood after being shot twice. Photograph: Gareth Copley/Getty Images

For Ahsan Raza, one of the umpires in England's match against the Pakistan Board XI who will also be involved in the internationals to come over the next few weeks, the sight of Stuart Broad in the pavilion had a special significance. "His father saved my life," Raza reflected matter of factly.

The 37-year-old father of three had been travelling with Chris Broad, the former England opener who is now an International Cricket Council match referee, to officiate at his first Test between Pakistan and Sri Lanka in his home city of Lahore when their bus came under attack from terrorists in the 2009 incident that drove this series to the desert.

"I was hit by two bullets, one in my lung," Raza said. "I was saved by two things. One, I put an ICC handbook, with all the rules and regulations, in front of my stomach." But one of the bullets still penetrated, as he shows by lifting his shirt to reveal a lengthy scar down his front. "I give credit to Chris Broad as well. He was crying at first, everybody in the bus was crying. But then there was a pin-drop silence everywhere, and he suddenly realised that someone – me – was lying dying and my blood was pumping full speed. He lay down on me to try to stop the flow. I just asked my Allah, please save my life for my kids, three small daughters – that was all."

Raza was in a coma for three days, and remained in intensive care for 27. One of his lungs was damaged beyond repair. But within eight months he had been appointed television umpire for the final of Pakistan's domestic Twenty20 competition. Shortly after that he travelled to Dubai for a one-day international between Pakistan and New Zealand, one of the first games that was relocated to the United Arab Emirates as a result of the Lahore shooting. "My first day driving to the ground here in Dubai, I turned to my match referee Andy Pycroft, and said: 'Where is the security? There was fear in my mind," Raza said. "Andy said: 'There's nothing, everything is fine here.' And after that I didn't feel anything. I feel safe anywhere now."

That includes Pakistan, Raza having refused the opportunity to move to the UK – where he had played for Kingstonians in Surrey and Motherwell in Scotland as a wicketkeeper-batsman. Broad had even offered to support his application for a visa. "But Pakistan is the land of my forefathers, I love it," he said. "And I tell you, it is fine now, things have changed. There are some places up in the hills, maybe, but in Karachi, Lahore, Faisalabad, the cities, you can play cricket easy. They have played games with 20,000 crowds and no problem. I have always said it is my dream to umpire in international cricket, so now that dream is for international cricket to go back to Pakistan, where the people love cricket so much. I hope it can happen soon."

Bangladesh are considering an offer to make a short tour in April and MCC is also planning to send a team of volunteers. As for Raza, he sees his appointment as fourth umpire for the first two Tests of England's series, then as one of the standing umpires for the first one-day international on 13 February, as a significant step towards his goal of joining his old friend Aleem Dar on the ICC's elite panel.

"I achieved one dream in 2010 when I was at Lord's as the TV umpire for the Test between Pakistan and Australia," he said. "Chris Broad was my match referee that day too and he said to me: 'I don't want to see you in that chair here again, I want to see you out on the ground.' That was a wonderful thing to say, and I have remembered it."

As for Broad Jr, who was rested from this match? "I did raise a hand to him when I saw him in the distance but I'm not sure he saw and maybe he doesn't know. That is good, because we know as an umpire, the cricketer cannot be our friend." So there will be no favours for Broad from Raza in the one‑day series, even if his father did save his life that terrifying morning in Lahore three years ago.

Link: http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2012/jan/13/stuart-broad-umpire-terrorists?newsfeed=true

Comments: I had read many read many disturbing things on Chris Broads history both as a player and match refree wrt his bias and prejudice against Asian players, teams but its the truth that the best time to judge a person is simply by his actions and not his words.

Definately all negative perceptions of Chris Broad have been considerably removed from my side atleast.

Tomorrow if we read some genuine scandal report about broad in the paper its back to square one,and we will start bashing him.

Your first point was absolutely right - "judge a person by his actions",but dont judge him always by a single action,keep an open mind all the time.

Coming to the main point,his action here is highly commendable
 
First of all Great Job Snr Broad...Respect!!

But However I personally a feel, however racist a person is when he sees a fellow human with a bullet ..any normal persons initial reaction will be to save him unless he is very stone hearted.

However in day to day life when coming to things like jobs, or in this case decisions on players behaviour....he will be his normal self with his normal frame of mind and be a racist.
 
This board tends to call BC Broad a racist because he accused the Pakistan security forces of being cowardly on the day...then again it turned out everyone else on the bus agreed with him, including Taufel and Murali. It also turned out Broad played a positive and apparently life-saving role. So haters can pretty much do one.....
 
This board tends to call BC Broad a racist because he accused the Pakistan security forces of being cowardly on the day...then again it turned out everyone else on the bus agreed with him, including Taufel and Murali. It also turned out Broad played a positive and apparently life-saving role. So haters can pretty much do one.....

He is accused and perceived of being a racist due to his history with Asian teams and players, not for his criticism of the security arrangements, capabilities of the Pakistani Security forces.
 
This board tends to call BC Broad a racist because he accused the Pakistan security forces of being cowardly on the day...then again it turned out everyone else on the bus agreed with him, including Taufel and Murali. It also turned out Broad played a positive and apparently life-saving role. So haters can pretty much do one.....

Yes those policemen who gave their lives for him and others were cowards.

Chris Broad just did what any human would do out of instinct, good on him but his comments afterwards were pathetic.
 
Politician and ex-Pakistan cricket captain Imran Khan criticised the security arrangements and said that the security provided was 10 times less than what is provided to government officials[92] such as Rehman Malik.[93][94]

Match referee Chris Broad was also critical of the security provided. He stated that he and his colleagues were left like 'sitting ducks' in the trailing minivan during the attack.[95] He also accused the security personnel of fleeing the scene.[96] He questioned why the Pakistan team which usually travelled with the Sri Lankan team was delayed by seven minutes that day and avoided being attacked.[97] Javed Miandad was critical of Broad's comments and demanded that International Cricket Council ban him for life.[98] Pakistan Cricket Board lodged a formal complaint against Chris Broad with the International Cricket Council on March 9, 2009.[99] Ijaz Butt, the head of Pakistan Cricket Board accused Broad of lying.[100] Umpire Simon Taufel also said that the umpire's minibus was abandoned while the players' bus was moved to the ground to evacuate the players.[101] Slamming the security entourage for abandoning them and inability of the police to arrest the attackers Simon said,"You tell me why no one was caught. You tell me why. Supposedly 25 armed commandos were in our convoy, and when the team bus got going again, we were left on our own."[101] Co-umpire Steve Davis said "he felt let down" by the security.[101] International Cricket Council umpires performance manager for East Asia, Sri Lanka and Pakistan, Peter Manuel told Dawn that the minivan carrying the umpires was basically abandoned by the security personnel. 'It was unbelievable. Bullets were raining on us and not a shot was fired in our defense by the Pakistan security officials,' the outraged Manuel said.[24] Sri Lanka coach Trevor Bayliss backed the comments made by Simon Taufel, Chris Broad and Steve Davis criticising the security.[102] Intikhab Alab, Pakistan cricket team's coach, asked Chris Broad to apologize to his country and team due to the remarks he made against Pakistani police security.[103] English cricketer Dominic Cork who was commentating in Pakistan on the series and who himself was caught in the attack later criticised the security and Pakistan Cricket Board chairman Ijaz Butt.[104]

Sri Lankan bowler Muttiah Muralitharan world's highest wicket taker said the security arrangement was the worst he had ever seen, and vastly inferior to that provided in Sri Lanka. He said 'The security people we had didn't even seem to fight back. Were they professionals with enough training? They didn't seem to know what to do. I was surprised the terrorists were able to just reload the magazines and keep firing, and they never got caught. It was shameful. If this had happened in Colombo they would never have got away.'[105]

Eye witness Habib Akram, bureau chief of Samaa television news channel said that the gunmen were very calm as they moved and fired by turns and that there was hardly any fire returned by the police. His office overlooks the traffic circle where the incident took place.[106] Closed-circuit television footage of the event reported by Geo TV showed four of the attackers walking or jogging away unchallenged from the site, into a marketplace while no policemen are seen.[106]

Former president and former army chief Pervez Musharraf criticized the police commandos inability to kill any of the gunmen, saying "If this was the elite force I would expect them to have shot down those people who attacked them, the reaction, their training should be on a level that if anyone shoots toward the company they are guarding, in less than three seconds they should shoot the man down."[107][108] Governor of Punjab province where the attack took place in Pakistan, gave medals and awards to honor valour and bravery of police officials for fighting the terrorists during the attack.[109]

Well, depends on your opinion of a lot of things of course...but in my view the writing seems to be on the wall
 
Broad sr just doing what is expected of any human. In times like those, you just can't sit to the side and watch a fellow person, colleague or friend bleed to death..

Huge respect to him nevetheless for dealing with the situation with bravery and maturity.
 
He is accused and perceived of being a racist due to his history with Asian teams and players, not for his criticism of the security arrangements, capabilities of the Pakistani Security forces.

The former part is all fans perceiving things...that means little to be honest....and others have read into his comments on the latter as racist

I personally don't think he's a racist based on what I've seen, I could be wrong though
 
The former part is all fans perceiving things...that means little to be honest....and others have read into his comments on the latter as racist

I personally don't think he's a racist based on what I've seen, I could be wrong though

I just think that he is a tool, i have seen him screwing SC teams on number of occasions but i'd not go as far as calling him racist, he might be but i dont know the man
 
This board tends to call BC Broad a racist because he accused the Pakistan security forces of being cowardly on the day...then again it turned out everyone else on the bus agreed with him, including Taufel and Murali. It also turned out Broad played a positive and apparently life-saving role. So haters can pretty much do one.....

Some of them may have been, but some died as well. Lets remember those were ordinary police, not trained army commandos (which should have been in place). Also they were poorly armed - a Pistol gun is going to do nothing against Automatic AK-47 guns rounds.
Thankfully the players and umpires survived and commendable to Broad for his act. A black day for Pakistan cricket.
 
Hm, then his comments were disrespectful to the brave men who died, but I don't think he would have meant for that to happen. I believe he was attempting to highlight the mostly inadequate security and hint at larger problems - and whether right or not, he was not alone in doing this.
 
Chris Broad saved a man's life, respect to the great man, why calling him a racist? Haven't heard him say any derogatory remarks about anyone's race or color, and it's shocking, the man saved a person's life who is of different color.
 
I quite like Chris Broad. He was a character as a player, and apparently a decent man when it came to it. I also like that he is committed to MND research and support, as I've done my share of researching and publishing articles on certain genetic mutations in MND/ALS.
 
I quite like Chris Broad. He was a character as a player, and apparently a decent man when it came to it. I also like that he is committed to MND research and support, as I've done my share of researching and publishing articles on certain genetic mutations in MND/ALS.

Just remember none of this matters in the face of fining an Asian cricketer ten per cent of his match fee
 
I agree with Whippy. I don't think he was criticising the people who gave up their lives to protect the players and officials. He was criticising the general security provided by the government. And it really was pathetic.

I only hope we provide the best possible security to the Bangladeshi players.
 
Big respect to Broad Sr. I have to admit I never liked the Broads but adversity brings out the true character of men and Broad Sr is admirable for his deed. Hats off Chris Broad.
 
Respect to Chris Broad Sr (Jr's still a prat to me though lol)

"But Pakistan is the land of my forefathers, I love it,"

Respect
 
i believe C.Broad does believe in white race been superior....

however, at the same time, it was just a human instinct to go n help the other...

i hope this episode changes C.Broad n reflects somthin on the junior...
 
There were others on that bus but it was Broad who laid down on Raza.
In this situation not many people would do what Broad did that day. When your life is in danger most people would look to protect themselves.
 
does anyone know the names of the dead policemen? mnnh? thought not,,

as for what broad did yes commendable and should be awarded for it,..doesnt ditract from the lack of respect the dead policemen have gotten from anyone..
 
Great gesture from Broad but both are still prats.

Furthermore, this article is nothing more than the British press beating their chess. This incident occurred 3 years ago and conveniently they re-publish an old story on the eve of the test match to invoke some feeling of twisted nationalism, pride, or whatever you want to call it.
 
The International Cricket Council has named Pakistan’s Ahsan Raza as an on-field umpire for the ICC Women’s T20 World Cup 2020 final, which will be played between Australia and India at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on Sunday, 8 March.

Ahsan’s on-field partner will be Kim Cotton, while Gregory Braithwaite will be the third umpire and Langton Rusere as the fourth umpire. Chris Broad of the Elite Panel of Match Referees will lead the playing control team.

Ahsan, a member of the ICC’s International Panel of Umpires, was also appointed on-field umpire for the semi-final between India and England, which was washed-out in Sydney on Thursday.

As a wicketkeeper-batsman, he played 21 first-class matches from 1993-2000, scoring 192 runs and dismissing 63 batsmen behind the wickets.
 
<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Ahsan Raza becomes the first match official to umpire in 50 T20Is <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Cricket?src=hash&ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Cricket</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PAKvZIM?src=hash&ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#PAKvZIM</a></p>— Saj Sadiq (@Saj_PakPassion) <a href="https://twitter.com/Saj_PakPassion/status/1325379394542718976?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 8, 2020</a></blockquote>
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