The Kookaburra ball debate

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Its finally being used in our domestic cricket. The Kookaburra ball is used predominantely in international cricket. Only India is allowed to use their SG balls in all matches in India and England is allowed to use the Duke. All teams that tour India also have to use the SG ball and in England teams have to use the Duke ball. Even though the kookaburra ball is expensive but i think its the step in the right direction.

However our domestic bowlers are now complaining that it just doesnt help the pacers compared to the previous domestic balls but the batsmen are loving it. But given the fact that this ball is used in international cricket most of the time, it must be used in domestic cricket, period, end of arguments irrespective of who wants to cry about it.

However the only problem with the kookaburra ball is that it has to be imported, the cost differential is massive, where the previous balls in use were around Rs 500-1000 each, this costs Rs 10,000-15,000 and the DG PCB Miandad was against this move because it was not cost effective. The PCB has also been approached by some local manufacturers who have promised them to build similar balls that are identical in characteristics to the international kookabura ball at a much lower cost but this will take time.

A lot of ex test cricketers, journalists like Waheed Khan have criticized this move saying at the time when the PCB is already short of revenue, funds they cannot afford these expenses and should not have adopted the kookaburra ball in international cricket. What next? The PCB should not spend money on making bouncy, seaming pitches in Pakistan?

Seriously the quality of analysis, insights by a vast majority of our ex test players and sports journalists is just rubbish. No wonder our ex test players do not get commentary assignments or coaching assignments abroad. If you have played the game for a while at both domestic or international level you should have some quality insights into the game atleast.
 
Kookaburra ball debate

Why are only England and India exempted from this rule! For how long has it been like this?
 
Pakistan should also use their home made cricket balls in the home (UAE) series.

The problem with Pakistan made cricket balls (Gray-Nicolls) is the consistancy of manufacture. The core of the ball varies in size and the hardness of the ball varies also. This results in two balls behaving differently in the same match and it becomes a lottery for the players.
 
The pathetic quality of our Domestic balls is the only reason why people like Rahat and Tanvir have picked heaps of wickets at the domestic level.
 
What is international standard?

They test a random batch of balls for hardness and roundness and if there is a large difference between the balls then they are not considered international standard. They also need to maintain shape and have consistant bounce.
 
SG balls hardly swings after 2 overs. I suppose the old Pak domestic balls were the same.


Its a good move to use Kookaburra balls in Pakistan domestic cricket. Once the domestic players get used to it it will help those that go on to play international cricket as they are already used to the characteristics of the ball.
 
If only if our local cricket balls which i think is the Grays are of international standard...then we must use it in our home series......otherwise does anybody has idea about the cost of Duke balls is it cheaper than Kokaburra or not???
 
SG balls hardly swings after 2 overs. I suppose the old Pak domestic balls were the same.


Its a good move to use Kookaburra balls in Pakistan domestic cricket. Once the domestic players get used to it it will help those that go on to play international cricket as they are already used to the characteristics of the ball.

no matter which brand is that, if you don't shine the ball, the ball will lose its shape + no more swing after few overs.
 

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If only if our local cricket balls which i think is the Grays are of international standard...then we must use it in our home series......otherwise does anybody has idea about the cost of Duke balls is it cheaper than Kokaburra or not???

I'm sure Duke's is more expensive. Not sure why we don't use the SG balls - surely they must be cheaper
 
Kookaburra making is very automated so the ball consistency is there.

However, Kookaburra itself is not the best option for the subcontinent.

The machine stitching is thin and the ball becomes dead pretty quickly. Then reverse swing is the only way left for seamers.

Also spinner grip is compromised.

Leather import can help with the inconsistency issue as well.
 
Why are only England and India exempted from this rule! For how long has it been like this?

All countries are allowed to choose whichever balls they like.

A while back there were problems with the quality of the Duke ball, which prompted the ECB to examine an alternative, the Tiflex ball, which was tried for a couple of seasons in Division 2 of the County Championship.

Spectators loved it, but many batsmen didn't. The quality of Duke balls magically improved, and the experiment with the Tiflex ball wasn't persisted with.
 
Its finally being used in our domestic cricket.


absolutely pathetic by PCB actually.

Cricket Australia has already given a red flag to Kookaburra balls and send a green signal to English made Duke balls.

When the world is rejecting 'em, we are adopting Kook balls as our next step towards improvement.
 
I'm sure Duke's is more expensive. Not sure why we don't use the SG balls - surely they must be cheaper

The PCB doesn't want to show its weakness to the BCCI and that it is dependent upon the Indians to make their equipment.
 
What did Pakistan use before the Kookaburra?

I'm a huge fan of both the Kookaburra and the SG, not so much of the dukes though.
 
Support home industry, don't rely too much on expensive foreign made stuff. #gandhi
 
But its hard to believe that there isn't any int quality ball maker in Pakistan as i believe you used to have a big sports equipment manufacturing industry? Guess one of the FIFA world cups even had majority of balls made in Pakistan. Strange that isn't the case for cricket in a country where cricket obviously is a far bigger passion than football.
 
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But its hard to believe that there isn't any int quality ball maker in Pakistan as i believe you sued to have a big sports equipment manufacturing industry? Guess one of the FIFA world cups even had majority of balls made in Pakistan. Strange that isn't the case for cricket in a country where cricket obviously is a far bigger passion than football.

I don't think pakistan have pressed the issue of using their our manufactured balls too much , as spineless is PCB I don't expect it to happen in near future.
 
But its hard to believe that there isn't any int quality ball maker in Pakistan as i believe you sued to have a big sports equipment manufacturing industry? Guess one of the FIFA world cups even had majority of balls made in Pakistan. Strange that isn't the case for cricket in a country where cricket obviously is a far bigger passion than football.

Even the cricket media seems lacking? All the threads pertaining to the Pakistan - South Africa series had links directing to NDTV Sports.
 
Even the cricket media seems lacking? All the threads pertaining to the Pakistan - South Africa series had links directing to NDTV Sports.

But they do have the #1 cricket forum. Shame on us. lol
 
Anyway back to that story, i read Sialkot was the largest manufacturer of Int' standard footballs at one point.
 
Anyway back to that story, i read Sialkot was the largest manufacturer of Int' standard footballs at one point.

I've also heard that Sialkot makes extremely effective cricket bats. :sachin is supposed to have previously ordered his MRFs from there when he used MRFs during the 90's.
 
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PCB plans to have Kookaburra balls locally manufactured

By Nabeel Hashmi

Published: March 2, 2013

"We’re looking to get Kookaburra made locally as the imported balls are proving way too expensive," PCB official.

KARACHI: The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) is mulling over the option of having the Kookaburra balls locally manufactured in a bid to reduce costs.

The Kookaburra balls, priced at Rs12,000, were used this season in the T20 tournament and the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, proved to be too costly for the board, who have now decided to find a cheaper alternative.

According to sources, PCB officials have held meetings with local companies and asked them to manufacture balls close to the quality of genuine Kookaburras.

“We’re looking to get Kookaburra made locally as the imported balls are proving way too expensive,” a PCB official told The Express Tribune.

“There are companies who are capable of making quality Kookaburra balls if they work honestly. We are in discussions with companies such as Grays and Aceline to provide us samples of locally made Kookaburras. Once we have assessed the quality of the balls, we’ll place an order with one of them.”

However, the official also stated that the major problem in Pakistan is that they do receive quality samples but companies fail to provide balls of the same quality with consistency.

He added that the PCB would have no problem in placing orders with local companies if they can maintain the standard of their product, something that will come in handy in cost cutting for the board as well as the promotion of the local industry.

“Locally manufactured Kookaburras will cost as much as the imported ball, close to Rs4,000. That will be really economical,” said the official.

These balls were introduced on the insistence of national players Muhammad Hafeez and Misbahul Haq despite resistance shown by PCB Director General Javed Miandad. The two skippers had stressed that Pakistan players should have an idea of bowling with Kookaburra balls which are used in the international arena.

Meanwhile, another senior PCB official revealed that they were not pleased with the output of the Kookaburra in the T20 event.

Several complaints – losing shape and extensive wear and tear – came up against the white Kookaburra during the domestic T20 tournament played in Lahore.

“Obviously you don’t want to get complaints when you buy a costly product and thus we have our reservations,” said the official. “The ball lost its shape during the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy final as well which was really embarrassing.”.

“Even Mohammad Akram (Pakistan bowling coach) had asked the think tank to lodge a complaint to the manufacturers as dozens of balls had problems.”

Published in The Express Tribune, March 2nd, 2013.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/514430/pcb-plans-to-have-kookaburra-balls-locally-manufactured/
 
But its hard to believe that there isn't any int quality ball maker in Pakistan as i believe you used to have a big sports equipment manufacturing industry? Guess one of the FIFA world cups even had majority of balls made in Pakistan. Strange that isn't the case for cricket in a country where cricket obviously is a far bigger passion than football.

The reason freelance_cricketer is that the quality cricket ball manufacturers get more from upfront payment from overseas buyers than the domestic market provides.

There is not a chance in hell that the local market in Pakistan will pay what overseas customers are paying.
 
A rejuvenated red Kookaburra ball Cricket Australia (CA) hopes will swing for longer could one day be used in Test cricket in Australia – and abroad – if an upcoming Marsh Sheffield Shield trial is successful.

The final two Shield rounds before the KFC Big Bash break will feature a subtly different ball which has been subject to ongoing testing and tinkering by Kookaburra in recent years.

To the naked eye, the ball appears no different. It is the same shape and weight, and features the same seam structure to the one currently used for first-class and Test cricket in Australia and around the world.

But it's hoped tweaks to the ball's leather will ensure it maintains its hardness for longer and therefore offer fast bowlers conventional swing for longer periods.

The concept is very much in its infancy and the ball will not be used for Test cricket this summer, but CA's Head of Cricket Operations Peter Roach believes it could in the future – and not just in Australia.

"The timeline (for its use in Tests) is unknown - we'll get through the next two games and we'll reassess again," Roach told cricket.com.au. "We'll work with Kookaburra to see if this is what we want to continue with for our first-class ball. We want to see balance between bat and ball and we hope this change further assists this.

"Then, if all is going well, can we potentially make change to the global game? that is a possibility, but that is still some way off.

"We don't just want Shield cricket to be a great contest between bat and ball – we want Test cricket to have a great balance."

Roach says CA has received feedback about the ball since introducing to the state second XI competition and for training sessions at domestic level.

The Kookaburra ball has come under the microscope at international level in recent years, copping criticism for deteriorating too quickly, while some domestic players have claimed the British-made Dukes ball (used for Ashes series played in England) is superior.

Even if CA is happy with the Shield trial, changing the ball used for international cricket would be a complex process involving other international cricket boards.

"Kookaburra work closely with all governing bodies in exploring continuous improvement in the game and are very appreciative of the opportunity CA have afforded us in this area," said Kookaburra Sport Managing Director Brett Elliot.

"We were set a small challenge by CA and its playing group and our research and development team had a number of existing concepts that could potentially meet this challenge.

"The new leather lining concept is something we've worked on internally for a number of years and we're now happy to partner further with CA on it to see if there's benefit to the game."

Roach stressed pitch and weather conditions are often a more important factor than ball composition in how the ball performs, but that hasn't stopped CA from pursuing "utopia".

"It was the (desire) of coaches, players and high-performance managers to want to keep trying to seek that perfect balance – the utopia," said the former Victoria wicketkeeper.

"The two balls we had in operation last year – we had the Kookaburra that in certain conditions we'd like to ideally swing more and stay harder for longer. Then we had the dukes that was in some conditions the other extreme – it didn't deteriorate a lot and could be seen to swing too much.

"So we thought, why don't we try to move that Kookaburra to swing a bit more for longer and try to remove those perceived questions on it?"

"It is subtle, we're not seeking major changes because we know it is a quality cricket ball. But we believe if we can achieve (improvement), the game will be better for it with a better balance between bat and ball."

The Dukes ball was introduced by CA to the Sheffield Shield in 2016 and will be used for the post-BBL portion of the season for a fifth consecutive summer when the first-class competition resumes in February.

With the next Ashes tour to be held in far-off 2023, the Dukes' ongoing use will be reassessed at the end of the season by CA's recently-appointed dual high-performance chiefs Ben Oliver and Drew Ginn.

Quantifying the success of the experiment is difficult but Roach said retaining the Ashes on English soil for the first time since 2001 earlier this year, combined with a breakout tour from Marnus Labuschagne who has played the majority of Queensland's games with the Dukes ball over the past four seasons, was encouraging.

"One of the reasons the Dukes was brought in was to better our chances of success in England and I think everyone would say that we performed admirably over there," he said.

"How much of that was on people being more used to the Dukes ball? I don't think we know the answer.

"Some of our players who don't play much Shield cricket after Christmas – our international bowlers for example – they probably haven't had much access to the Dukes ball (before this year's Ashes).

"But for some of our batsmen like Marnus, walking into the Test team (from the Sheffield Shield), it probably did have an advantage. They're the things we've got to weigh up."

https://www.cricket.com.au/news/new...sheffield-shield-cricket-australia/2019-11-27
 
Waqar Younis suggesting we should move to Duke for Tests...

Any merit in that?
 
Waqar Younis suggesting we should move to Duke for Tests...

Any merit in that?

Pakistan along with India Australia and England have a well developed domestic cricket equipment manufacturing.

Rest 3 use their local made balls,

India SG
England Duke.
Australia Kookaburra

Why isn't pakistan using a CA or similar ball?

Second option ofcourse is Dukes as ot is made in pakistan too.

Importing 50000rs Kookaburra balls for tests in Pakistan make no sense.
 
Pakistan along with India Australia and England have a well developed domestic cricket equipment manufacturing.

Rest 3 use their local made balls,

India SG
England Duke.
Australia Kookaburra

Why isn't pakistan using a CA or similar ball?

Second option ofcourse is Dukes as ot is made in pakistan too.

Importing 50000rs Kookaburra balls for tests in Pakistan make no sense.
Good point.
 
Btw Dukes was used in India in 80s and was not very successful. BCCI then shifted to Sonnex made cricket balls, then settled on SG in 1993.
 
As an Englishman I have always liked the Dukes and put my trust in the Dukes, but this summer just gone it seemed to have gone downhill and be easily losing its shape. If there is no improvement next year, maybe it will be time to try something different.
 
Honestly this kookaburra ball on dead wickets is gonna kill our bowlers. It’s one thing to have a soft ball on bouncy pitches like Perth or Brisbane but in Pindi and multan our bowlers and any other seam bowler will just get hammered and there too much of an imbalance between bat and ball.
 
As an Englishman I have always liked the Dukes and put my trust in the Dukes, but this summer just gone it seemed to have gone downhill and be easily losing its shape. If there is no improvement next year, maybe it will be time to try something different.

What is the reason for the quality issues with Dukes? How long has England been using Dukes?

India used Dukes for sometime in 70s and early 80s but it got ragged on the seams quickly. Then India tried a local ball, Sonex, before finally settling on SG.

Pakistan has a cricket equipment manufacturing industry as good as anyone. I am surprised they import Kookaburra.The likes of CA can rival anyone in terms of.Heard even Dukes is made in pakistan these days. Why don't they use locally made balls is beyond me!!
 
What is the reason for the quality issues with Dukes? How long has England been using Dukes?

India used Dukes for sometime in 70s and early 80s but it got ragged on the seams quickly. Then India tried a local ball, Sonex, before finally settling on SG.

Pakistan has a cricket equipment manufacturing industry as good as anyone. I am surprised they import Kookaburra.The likes of CA can rival anyone in terms of.Heard even Dukes is made in pakistan these days. Why don't they use locally made balls is beyond me!!
i've heard comms talk on sky sports broadcast that they spoke with dukes and they said that poor diet of cows was the reason for bad leather and hence bad quality balls made from it. as funny as the poor diet sounds, that is what i remember hearing and just checked that is what written in times uk article.
 
i've heard comms talk on sky sports broadcast that they spoke with dukes and they said that poor diet of cows was the reason for bad leather and hence bad quality balls made from it. as funny as the poor diet sounds, that is what i remember hearing and just checked that is what written in times uk article.

Can you please post the article? Sounds interesting.
 
Anyone knows which ball is used in Pakistan domestic circuit? Which manufacturer?
 
Honestly this kookaburra ball on dead wickets is gonna kill our bowlers. It’s one thing to have a soft ball on bouncy pitches like Perth or Brisbane but in Pindi and multan our bowlers and any other seam bowler will just get hammered and there too much of an imbalance between bat and ball.

Dukes do also produce a slightly tougher ball that gets used in the WI and could be a potential option.
 
Anyone knows which ball is used in Pakistan domestic circuit? Which manufacturer?


Cows’ grazing habits and the Covid-19 pandemic could be to blame for the complaints about Dukes balls this season, according to the owner of the company that manufactures them.

Dukes said the balls used for the Test series between England and New Zealand, which starts next week, would be hand-picked after complaints were made about their performance and quality during the early rounds of the County Championship.

The England bowlers Stuart Broad and James Anderson have both been critical of the balls for a lack of swing and for going soft and losing shape too quickly, making it easier for batsmen to score runs and harder for bowlers to take wickets. Broad said it was like bowling with “a rolled up piece of plasticine”.
 
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Bring back the duke/grace balls in domestic cricket

Kookaburra ball has made our domestic batsmen absolutely rubbish, slight bit of movement by international class bowlers and our batsmen start to dance around like headless chicken.

We are not producing any bowlers with the new system, at least our batsmen were lot prepared when they faced challenging conditions. Our batsmen always did well in England and here we are struggling in Pakistan.

One of the worst decisions by Wasim Khan and Mani
 
Agreed. Flat pitches + Kookaburra are a horrible combo.

Best to make flat pitches with Dukes, or sporting pitches with Kookaburra.

Or play one round with Dukes and other with Kookaburra.
 
Kookaburra ball has made our domestic batsmen absolutely rubbish, slight bit of movement by international class bowlers and our batsmen start to dance around like headless chicken.

We are not producing any bowlers with the new system, at least our batsmen were lot prepared when they faced challenging conditions. Our batsmen always did well in England and here we are struggling in Pakistan.

One of the worst decisions by Wasim Khan and Mani

Agreed. Flat pitches + Kookaburra are a horrible combo.

Best to make flat pitches with Dukes, or sporting pitches with Kookaburra.

Or play one round with Dukes and other with Kookaburra.

Totally. Especially when we cant create the pitches as we would like at least the ball should provide something to create better balance.
 
Kookaburra ball has made our domestic batsmen absolutely rubbish, slight bit of movement by international class bowlers and our batsmen start to dance around like headless chicken.

We are not producing any bowlers with the new system, at least our batsmen were lot prepared when they faced challenging conditions. Our batsmen always did well in England and here we are struggling in Pakistan.

One of the worst decisions by Wasim Khan and Mani

Don't agree with this. Nothing wrong with the current kookaburra ball. It was improved in the 2020-21 season and has held up rather well.

English seamers got the same kookaburra ball to talk and now debutante leggie has got a fifer with it.

Right question to ask is why can't Pakistan produce Test quality seamers who can bowl with this ball?
 
Don't agree with this. Nothing wrong with the current kookaburra ball. It was improved in the 2020-21 season and has held up rather well.

English seamers got the same kookaburra ball to talk and now debutante leggie has got a fifer with it.

Right question to ask is why can't Pakistan produce Test quality seamers who can bowl with this ball?

The new ball did zilch, England got the ball to marginally reverse swing apart from last sessions of Pindi test day 5. The ball didn't talk much if you had watched the whole series, our batsmen were rubbish, gave easy wickets.

Rashid Latif on game on hai show just agreed with my opinion. The ball is rubbish for Pakistani condition. If the ball was so good then why doesn't India and Bangladesh use the same ball. They know it is not suitable at all for the conditions.

Duke/grace Balls create a more challenging situation for batsmen, QEA in last four years had so many countless and boring draws, batsmen were scoring runs for fun.
 
The new ball did zilch, England got the ball to marginally reverse swing apart from last sessions of Pindi test day 5. The ball didn't talk much if you had watched the whole series, our batsmen were rubbish, gave easy wickets.

Rashid Latif on game on hai show just agreed with my opinion. The ball is rubbish for Pakistani condition. If the ball was so good then why doesn't India and Bangladesh use the same ball. They know it is not suitable at all for the conditions.

Duke/grace Balls create a more challenging situation for batsmen, QEA in last four years had so many countless and boring draws, batsmen were scoring runs for fun.

Who makes Grace balls?

Do companies like CA, Malik etc mske balls?

From when did Pakistan decide to use Kookaburra and why? What was used before that?
 
Who makes Grace balls?

Do companies like CA, Malik etc mske balls?

From when did Pakistan decide to use Kookaburra and why? What was used before that?

No idea who makes it but it was used domestically. There was too much blame on balls but hard-core green pitches were at fault.

It was a stupid idea to use Kookaburra in Pakistan, doesn't support low bounce pitches
 
The reasoning behind using kookaburra was because the domestic stats in Pakistan domestic cricket from 2010 to 2018 were filled with medium pacers topping the charts with many easy wickets but these same bowlers like Asad Ali when they played international cricket and icc tournaments were badly exposed using the kookaburra ball.
 
The reasoning behind using kookaburra was because the domestic stats in Pakistan domestic cricket from 2010 to 2018 were filled with medium pacers topping the charts with many easy wickets but these same bowlers like Asad Ali when they played international cricket and icc tournaments were badly exposed using the kookaburra ball.

Pitches were bad, proper green tops.

Grace balls were used in 90s yet we produce likes of Shoaib, Zahid and Sami
 
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No idea who makes it but it was used domestically. There was too much blame on balls but hard-core green pitches were at fault.

It was a stupid idea to use Kookaburra in Pakistan, doesn't support low bounce pitches

Which ball was used before Kookaburra?
 
No idea who makes it but it was used domestically. There was too much blame on balls but hard-core green pitches were at fault.

It was a stupid idea to use Kookaburra in Pakistan, doesn't support low bounce pitches

Its Gray's balls and not Grace.

So what i found out is,

PCB used the Kookaburra in domestic cricket from 2000 to 2007. Ijaz Butt changed it to Gray's. Then in 2012 it was changed to Kookaburra again.

https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/...pakistan-domestic-cricket-587508?platform=amp


Sometime later it was changed to Dukes. And then again changed to Kookaburra in 2012.

https://www.icc-cricket.com/news/1329821
 
Its Gray's balls and not Grace.

So what i found out is,

PCB used the Kookaburra in domestic cricket from 2000 to 2007. Ijaz Butt changed it to Gray's. Then in 2012 it was changed to Kookaburra again.

https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/...pakistan-domestic-cricket-587508?platform=amp


Sometime later it was changed to Dukes. And then again changed to Kookaburra in 2012.

https://www.icc-cricket.com/news/1329821

Dukes was used in 2017 and 2018. Changed to Kookaburra again in 2019.

https://www.cricketworld.com/pakist...et-balls-in-domestic-season-2019-20/58667.htm
 
Its Gray's balls and not Grace.

So what i found out is,

PCB used the Kookaburra in domestic cricket from 2000 to 2007. Ijaz Butt changed it to Gray's. Then in 2012 it was changed to Kookaburra again.

https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/...pakistan-domestic-cricket-587508?platform=amp


Sometime later it was changed to Dukes. And then again changed to Kookaburra in 2012.

https://www.icc-cricket.com/news/1329821

Thanks for the correction, but my point stands.
 
The new ball did zilch, England got the ball to marginally reverse swing apart from last sessions of Pindi test day 5. The ball didn't talk much if you had watched the whole series, our batsmen were rubbish, gave easy wickets.

Rashid Latif on game on hai show just agreed with my opinion. The ball is rubbish for Pakistani condition. If the ball was so good then why doesn't India and Bangladesh use the same ball. They know it is not suitable at all for the conditions.

Duke/grace Balls create a more challenging situation for batsmen, QEA in last four years had so many countless and boring draws, batsmen were scoring runs for fun.

New balls have rarely done anything through the air in Pakistani conditions. That has little to do with the ball.

What movement you do get in Pakistan is reverse swing and the question is why Pakistani bowlers couldn't reverse the ball like the English did.

Dukes also didn't do much in the West Indies this year when the pitches were uber flat.

Also, I'd Pakistan start using Dukes, are you sure it will give you an advantage? Are you sure visiting teams bowlers won't swing the new ball more than Pakistani bowlers?

India use SG because I is locally made, cheaper I think and aids spinners. BD use kookaburra only AFAIK.

I reiterate. PAK need to find out why domestic bowlers are not able to cut it at international cricket anymore. Also make sure you get 90 overs a day.

Focusing on the ball is a waste of time.
 
Thanks for the correction, but my point stands.

PCB has changed the ball 5 times in last 20 odd years.

2000-2007 Kookaburra

2007-2012 Gray's

2012-2017 Kookaburra

2018 and 2019 Duke's

2020 onwards Kookaburra.

Gray's was changed because apparently it had quality issues.

Duke's was abandoned because players felt it supported the bowlers.

This is too frequent ball change.

In contrast,

BCCI.

Used Dukes in late 70s and early 80s

Changed to Sonnex balls in early 80s

Finally settled on SG in 1993


Pakistan has a very developed cricket equipment manufacturing industry. I see no reason why they can't have a local ball manufactured as per their requirement.
 
Overlooked factor: the remodelled Kookaburra ball...

In contemplations on low-scoring Tests in Australia the past two summers, bowler-friendly pitches are drawing all the attention, like prima donnas, obscuring an equally important factor: bowler-friendly balls.

Two years ago, in an effort to liven up Test cricket, Cricket Australia introduced a re-designed Kookaburra ball, with an extra layer of lacquer for hardening and a lining under the surface that means the all-important seam stands prouder for longer.


Not coincidentally, a series of abbreviated but rapid Test matches has ensued. “The Kookaburra ball is contributing, definitely, and for me that’s a positive,” said commentator and former Test seamer Damien Fleming. “I think it is the future.”

Fleming said as well as the remodelled ball and grassier pitches, substandard top order West Indian and South African batting had led to havoc. “It’s a few things coming together,” he said. “I think we can all agree we don’t want that summer of four or five years ago when they were all absolute belters.”

Fleming recalled that on previously flat pitches, Australia’s quality fast bowlers had developed scrambled seam bowling to create some random if not especially prodigious movement. Mostly, it entailed cutting the ball a little one way or the other with their fingers, like a spin bowler, reducing pace.

“With a more pronounced seam, the scrambled seamer is a bigger weapon now,” he said. “In the last two years, with the Kookaburra ball on green pitches, scrambled seam means hardly a ball goes straight.

“They’re not fast spinners, they’re flat out. Their wrists and fingers are behind the ball. The ball’s seaming at their usual pace.

“If you ask batsmen, they’d rather face late swing than late seam. Swing you can sometimes get a bit of a sighter in the air. When it’s on the seam and it’s full, you’ve already decided what shot you’re going to play.”

Fleming noted that captain Pat Cummins, encouraged by the extra movement, was bowling fuller. Previously, he did not get many wickets lbw. “In the last two summers, his lbs and bowleds have gone through the roof.”

Fleming said one pleasing side effect of the changed dynamics was to restore meaning to runs. “One thing I love as a commentator is that you rate runs,” he said. “Travis Head’s last two summers are super impressive. His two hundreds against England in bowler-friendly conditions were match-winners.

“Without this 90, we probably lose this Test match [against South Africa]. We can legitimately say he has won three Test matches in bowling conditions.”

On the fine line that curators walk, bowling conditions sometimes tipped over into obliterating conditions. Test matches in Australia in the last two years typically have been done inside four days, last year’s Boxing Day Test finished an hour into the third day and the first South Africa Test last week was over inside two days.


Fleming said he felt for curators. “Curating is a lot like new ball swing bowling. There are controllable factors and non-controllable factors,” he said. “The curators can control the grass on the pitch and the rolling, but they can’t control the weather.”

The pitches in Perth and Brisbane, for instance, have roughly the same clay content and sported a similar coverage of grass for recent Tests, but the Brisbane pitch was harder underneath, making it faster and inflicting carnage on batsmen. For Boxing Day, the MCG is anticipating a good pitch, but less lively than the one for last year’s Ashes Test, when Scott Boland made his spectacular debut.

Josh Hazlewood missed Australia’s past two Tests because of injury, but if fully recovered will create a pleasant headache for selectors on Boxing Day: him or Boland?

“I’m going with Scott Boland over Josh Hazlewood,” said Fleming. “Part of me can’t believe I’m saying that because Josh will end up one of our greatest bowlers, if he isn’t already.


“I’m worried about his injury, to that grunter muscle. There is some uncertainty around it. We’ve got fast bowling depth. We’ve got a guy who’s averaging 10 with the ball. I’d be erring with caution. We’ve got India. We’ve got England. We’ve got a guy who’s basically on fire. Big ‘Bolo’ for me!”

One thing is certain: between a bowler-friendly pitch, bowler-friendly ball and a home crowd, the MCG is certain to be Boland-friendly.

https://www.smh.com.au/sport/cricket/batters-scrambling-the-new-kookaburra-ball-that-seams-to-wreak-havoc-20221220-p5c7vv.html
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Ramiz responded to this question on his vlog that the reason why the PCB chose to use the kookaburra ball is because the grays ball while permissible for domestic cricket was not recognized by the ICC as an international standard ball.

A lot of players in domestic cricket were struggling in international cricket once they had to bowl with the kookaburra ball and therefore the PCB had no choice but to make the kookaburra ball compulsory in their domestic cricket to ensure that the domestic players don't struggled when they play international cricket.

The PCB tried the dukes ball and it was unsuitable for Pakistani conditions.
 
Ramiz responded to this question on his vlog that the reason why the PCB chose to use the kookaburra ball is because the grays ball while permissible for domestic cricket was not recognized by the ICC as an international standard ball.

A lot of players in domestic cricket were struggling in international cricket once they had to bowl with the kookaburra ball and therefore the PCB had no choice but to make the kookaburra ball compulsory in their domestic cricket to ensure that the domestic players don't struggled when they play international cricket.

The PCB tried the dukes ball and it was unsuitable for Pakistani conditions.

Rameez is right regarding the Duke’s ball.bcci has used the Dukes ball in 70s and found it unsuitable.
 
The problem isn't the ball but the pitches

There's a company sis in uk although those wickets can't be used in test matches has been installing hybrid grass/plastic pitches for county teams

The one In Lords the strip cost 6000 pounds.

Similar type can be used in pakistan domestics and made to have more pace bounce and carry to the keeper.
It will definetly help our batsmen develop their game and strokeplay ability and give our quicks to bowl on something hard and pacey .

Obviously those strips can't be used in intl games but icc is looking at allowing hybrid pitches they last 10 years and require less maintenance
 
The problem isn't the ball but the pitches

There's a company sis in uk although those wickets can't be used in test matches has been installing hybrid grass/plastic pitches for county teams

The one In Lords the strip cost 6000 pounds.

Similar type can be used in pakistan domestics and made to have more pace bounce and carry to the keeper.
It will definetly help our batsmen develop their game and strokeplay ability and give our quicks to bowl on something hard and pacey .

Obviously those strips can't be used in intl games but icc is looking at allowing hybrid pitches they last 10 years and require less maintenance

The whole point of hybrid pitches is that they don't deteriorate as fast therefore are ideal for playing a big batch of limited overs games at grounds that have a significant amount of fixtures. That makes them far from ideal for multi day cricket hence why they've never been used for a FC game. It also doesn't change the fundamentals of the pitch, they're just 'sewn' in to the existing pitch.
 
The PCB tried the dukes ball and it was unsuitable for Pakistani conditions.

Did they try the version of the dukes ball intended for harsher conditions like the one used in the West Indies?
 
Well maybe these pitches can be installed at the nhpc

Where you have one hybrid pitch with pace and bounce

One with pace and bounce but good grass covering and moisture so the ball moves .

And one which Australia have produced that aids grip and spin and has red synthetic grass.

Players can practice on various types both bowlers and batsmen and any youngster sent to the nhpc.

As for white ball limited overs I would install them ASAP in domestics because the wicket remains stable you can play many games on them and I want pitches with pace and bounce and even ones left with a bit of grass it will definetly improve our batsmen and bowling who can then take their improvements into test cricket we have seen how England and Australia with their approach to limited overs t20 has translated into test cricket they played on the same dead wickets but looked much better .
They are giving a new dimension to test cricket and going with an approach that is different to way the traditional red ball approach.
 
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