The Health Service in Pakistan

Saj

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Is it a question of you only get decent treatment if you put down enough bank notes first, or even being rather wealthy doesnt mean that you will receive a decent service ? (as per the case of Wasim Akram's wife Huma).
 
Overall Pakistani Healthcare system is a joke, if it wasn't for some of the non profits running some hospitals and health care facilities our people wouldn't get anything. There are some good hospitals in Islamabad, which are obviously out of majority's reach. Huma Akram's case simply comes down to negligence or incompetence which can happen every where.
 
My phupho hs breast cancer and her case is particuarly complex and keeps on recurring. She has required a high degree of medical care and surgeries and yet she has never left Pakistan.

The healthcare she receieved was of a very high standard and the doctors of the country gave a briliant account of themselves.

As far as my personal experience is concerned, these days whenever I go to Pakistan and have required medical attention I noticed that the vast majority of the doctors in Pakistan these days are foreign qualified, either from the UK, US or Australia etc...therefore it would imply that the standard in terms of doctors at least would be the same.
 
Since Wasim Akram's case was mentioned - I will say that him, his wife and family living in Pakistan would know the situation. They are rich and could have gone out earlier if diagnosed or even if not diagnosed and problems were there. Maybe a strange case where something mild became extreme quickly or not right doctors or hospitals with facilities consulted. Maybe it was doctors saying there is no hope and Akram decided to go somewhere else. No I am not putting the blame on Akram or his wife or family or even the doctors they consulted. Or even saying general hospitals in Pakistan are good. People die of medical complications everywhere.

For thoes who are not rich have no choice. They can try some doctors or go to probably 2-4 hospitals like Agha Khan. But then you hear about celebrities (meaning politicans moslty) going out to get treatment says something else
 
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First of all as I said in my other thread that:

Once Malikul Mout (Angel of Death) has an order to capture ones Roo (Soul) he will not care or see what the person is doing. In fact, his Roo will be taken right away. Take PPers for example we all saw how our Brother Bilal Rana (Desi_Lanka420) died.

Furthermore, ALLAH (SWT) has set a date of our death and it could apporach any day. So we shouldn't blame poor facilties that cost ones life. The reason why I said that is because no matter what treatment you get or the standard of treatment you get nor it matters how rich you are if your death has approached you will died no matter what on that given date.

But apart from Islamic perspective the health system in Pakistan is not upto mark. I have heard Shakuat Khanam (Imran Khan's) hospital is pretty good (I have heard it from our relative, my cousin and my brother (both cousin and brother has volunteered over there). Recently one of our very close relatives family member died in Pakistan. Intially he got a cut somewhere on his body (not sure where as I was not there) and he had lost too much blood that they had to put blood drips. So what happened after they had given him blood through drips? It was found out that he had been given wrong blood group drip whereas he later died. Few years back when I was admitted in a hospital (I went to Pakistan during a summer break, I was admitted to National Hospital, in Lahore Defence) what I noticed was that first you always had to pay the fee and then you will be treated. I completely agree with what Wasim Akram's brother said. What he said about Pakistani hospital was in fact true and I have witnessed that when I was admitted to the hospital.

I have been to three countries hospital (Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and Canada). Honestly speaking I would say each country health care service has some sort of problem. In Saudi Arabia's hospital in order to get admitted into a government hospital you need some sort of letter (I am not sure what it is called in Arabic but you do need some sort of letter or something. I am only talking about Government Hospitals in private's you don't need anything). In Canada's hospital (Not sure about others but in Brampton it is a major problem) it is that you have to wait in a lougue. For example, if you go to hospital in Emergency ward you will have to wait in the loungue and then you will be treated. While waiting in lougue we have seen few people who have passed away.
 
Saj said:
Is it a question of you only get decent treatment if you put down enough bank notes first, or even being rather wealthy doesnt mean that you will receive a decent service ? (as per the case of Wasim Akram's wife Huma).
In some ways its not very different from the good ol' US of A.
In 2005, my young daughter almost died, while they were checking to see if I had health insurance, and whether or not it covered her - even though I had my Credit Cards and Cheque book out and was screaming at them to charge whatever they liked as long as they did not keep us waiting.

Once they had checked,and verified that we had 'A' class insurance (via my employer), in terms of treatment she had the very best money could buy. Private room, with attached room containing bed for me and my wife to sleep/wash in, and Doctors/Nurses coming running whenever required. When she was discharged, a week later, a nurse coming 5 times a day, for 10 days, to the house, to administer medication and making sure everything was ok.

The Insurance company paid out around $35,000 in total !

(When we took my daughter to the hospital, she was having stomach pains, which the Triage nurse thought was just Gastroenteritis but it turned out to be a burst appendix)

Thus even in the States, Credit Cards/Cheques books can be useless and only an Insurance company account or cash does the trick. But who carries that much cash in their pockets all the time?
 
Cover Drive said:
In Saudi Arabia's hospital in order to get admitted into a government hospital you need some sort of letter (I am not sure what it is called in Arabic but you do need some sort of letter or something. I am only talking about Government Hospitals in private's you don't need anything).
It is a letter from a Member of the Royal family, giving permission for you to be treated and to waive the costs.
Since there are are literally 10,000+ 'Members of the Royal Family', it should not be too difficult getting this letter, as long as you are a Saudi.
If you're a Western expat, no problem. Your company will already have made arrangements. Otherwise, you're you're in deep sh!te !

(Having worked upon Projects in Saudi Hopitals, I recall cases of men giving birth on 3 or 4 occasions, dying a couple of times,...etc.
Turned out that Letters have been given for individuals, which then have been passed around the families and neighbours for everyone to be treated - using the same name/registration number!)
 
I may be wrong, or I may offend some people and I am sorry, but I think that once the people in Pakistan find out you're from Britain, they tend to take better care of you.
For example, I was coming back from Islamabad Airport to Birmingham International. My mother was checking in the luggage at Islamabad, and my brother needed to go to the toilet. She sent me with him (as he was very young) and so I took him into the ladies toilets. All of a sudden I felt very dizzy and I felt like I was going to die. It felt strange. It turned out I had fainted due to low blood pressure.
Anyway, I woke up in a nice, clean medical room in the airport, where I saw a doctor, who seemed to be checking my passport from my mum (I haven't got a clue why).
They took pretty good care of me and I have a feeling it was because they found out I was British. I hate it when that happens.
Another thing is that there is lack of basic healthcare in the small villages of Pakistan. Back in 2004 my grandfather (Allah Jannat Naseeb Kare), was diagnosed with cancer when he was staying with us in England. The doctors had only predicted that he would survive for a month, but mashallah he managed to live for six months. Typical of any elderly Pakistani person, he wanted to go back to the village (but the funny thing is that he didn't even know he had cancer. Maybe he had a sixth sense? I don't know). In March 2005 he passed away. If there had been sufficient healthcare, we would have been able to spend more time with him.
But I guess you can't have everything ey?
 
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Saj, you know the situation back in England.. Its pretty back as well.. I hope you never had to visit Royal Liverpool or Alder Hey.. The doctors are first class but the waiting lists etc is pathetic.. I know someone who was giver 18 months for a knee operation.. There is also the case of how they determine which case is a priority so e.g if someones got something through which they wont die its bad..

In Pakistan, luckily Ive only had to visit the hospital once (Aga Khan as it happens to be) and it was first class but I doubt getting a consultants appointments and tests would be within a poor mans reach.. pretty pathetic really so NHS is excellent from that perspective..
A special mention to charitable trusts like SKMH and SIUT which are excellent and free but that is more to do with philanthropy and zakat than the government doing anything..
 
The goveremnt run hospitals here in Pakistan are basically under equipped & under staffed and overflowing with patients mostly from low income segments. These hospitals lack lab & other testing facilities and most of the time you will be told to get blood tests and x-rays etc from outside the hospital on your own cost. Infact you wil see many such businesses right outside any hospital here.

Most of the people who can afford it will visit private clinics of the doctors (many of whom also work in Govt. Hospitals during the day and in the evenings will have private clinics)

Many times the private hospitals are run by blood sucking inefficient doctors and being able to afford it does not mean you will receive best medical care as well. and if its an emergencies such as road accident which may require police involvment then many private hospitals refuze treatment so back to govt. hospital.

Overall there are only a handful of hospitals in the whole country most of which are in big cities like karachi,lahore & islamabad where you may be promised proper medical care even if it comes at a cost.

Generally in my experince here you need to know a good doctor for your problem. It doesn't matter whether that doctor is in govt hospital or a private hospital.

A few years back i got high fever & vomiting, in the middle of the night. I was taken to Shifa International Hospital Islamabad which is supposed to be one of the best there. With out conducting any tests the doctor gave me antibiotics[his diagnosis=food posioning] which further deterioted my condition & i was completely dehydrated. Needless to say had to pay big bucks as well!( same may have happened with Mrs. Wasim Akram)

Finally a family friend recommended a doctor working in Poli-Clinic, a Govt hospital, where i was diagnosed with Tyfoid after tests and shared a bed with another patient overnight in ER which comprised of 3 beds in all!

The only reason I received proper treatment was due to that doctor's correct diagnosis otherwise my family would have been left taking me from one hospital to another.
 
All about your connections. Army connections will get you efficient treatment in the army hospitals. Otherwise its all about the amount of money you want to commit.
 
madaboutlfc said:
Saj, you know the situation back in England.. Its pretty back as well.. I hope you never had to visit Royal Liverpool or Alder Hey.. The doctors are first class but the waiting lists etc is pathetic.. I know someone who was giver 18 months for a knee operation.. There is also the case of how they determine which case is a priority so e.g if someones got something through which they wont die its bad..

In Pakistan, luckily Ive only had to visit the hospital once (Aga Khan as it happens to be) and it was first class but I doubt getting a consultants appointments and tests would be within a poor mans reach.. pretty pathetic really so NHS is excellent from that perspective..
A special mention to charitable trusts like SKMH and SIUT which are excellent and free but that is more to do with philanthropy and zakat than the government doing anything..

Isn't that the hospital where the organ scandal happened? Or maybe I'm just imagining it? :13:
 
KhushbuHussain said:
Isn't that the hospital where the organ scandal happened? Or maybe I'm just imagining it? :13:
yep thats the one..health care in England is poor if we are being blatantly honest..
 
madaboutlfc said:
yep thats the one..health care in England is poor if we are being blatantly honest..
It's true. Yeah sure its semi-free but still the standard of healthcare is slowly dropping. When I was ten, I broke my arm. I was left waiting in incredible pain for 7 hours in A&E. My parents were annoyed, and I just could not stop crying. One of the worst experiences in hospital of my life. :(
 
My parents are doctors, and they always mention about the medical culture in Punjab being extremely corrupt, rotten and unethical where a vast majority of the doctors are only intrested in money, not providing quality healthcare. It might sound biased from them but they both always make these points most of the times.

But yes barring a few honorable exceptions, Pakistan has a long way to go as far as health care is concerned, i had worked in AKU as an internee which is one of the best Hospitals in Pakistan and i am sorry but the amount of politics, infighting, back biting, jealousy amongst various doctors and other specialists in various departments was just unbelievable. And i am sure its even worse in other hospitals especially govt run hospitals.
 
What is the situation of healthcare in Pakistan?

I guess living abroad, you only ever hear the bad news about what happens in Pakistani hospitals.

How bad is the situation on a day to day basis and are things on the way to getting better or worse?
 
Getting worse and worse. A clear example of the incompetency and inexperience of PTI’s circus government.

Please don’t go by their social media propaganda. They are all lies. The ground reality is completely different.
 
Getting worse and worse. A clear example of the incompetency and inexperience of PTI’s circus government.

Please don’t go by their social media propaganda. They are all lies. The ground reality is completely different.

Can you elaborate more?
 
Getting worse and worse. A clear example of the incompetency and inexperience of PTI’s circus government.

Please don’t go by their social media propaganda. They are all lies. The ground reality is completely different.

Your post seems more propaganda-esque than what PTI put on social media. 0 facts and statistics in this post. Would you please give some statistics and facts to back up your argument please?
Not saying you are wrong but at least back up your arguments.
 
Pakistan Introduces Health Insurance for Transgender

Prime Minister Imran Khan says facility will be available to any transgender registered with NADRA

The Sehat Insaf Card will provide health insurance for members of Pakistan’s transgender community to ensure the rights and protection of the most vulnerable segments of society, Prime Minister Imran Khan said on Monday.

Addressing a ceremony to launch the Sehat Insaf Card, a subsidiary of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf-led government’s Sehat Sahulat program, Khan claimed this was the firs time in Pakistan’s history that an incumbent regime had taken responsibility of the transgender community, with an aim toward giving them a “a sense of ownership” over their status as Pakistanis. “Pakistan was established on the basis of justice, humanity and humane feelings for the downtrodden,” he added.

As he does in every major address, Khan criticized previous governments for not protecting the rights of transgenders. He claimed, wrongly, that past regimes had not even accepted the existence of the transgender community. In 2017, the Pakistan Muslim League (Nawaz)-led government issued the country’s first passport with a transgender category. In 2009, the Supreme Court ruled that transgenders could get national identity cards as a “third sex.” A new bill, signed into law by the caretaker government last year, mandated the government to set up dedicated safe spaces with medical and educational facilities for transgender individuals. The law already mandates the facility being provided by the PTI.

Khan said the government would provide health insurance to all segments of society, adding the PTI would strive to remove negative perceptions about the transgender community across Pakistan. He said the initiative would be available to all individuals registered with the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) from the Islamabad Capital Territory, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Gilgit-Baltistan and all four provinces.

The prime minister said the Sehat Insaf Card would open up the options available to the impoverished, noting that families could now confidently avail treatment facilities at various health facilities across the country.

Khan also appreciated Special Assistant to the P.M. on Health Dr. Zafar Mirza for proposing extending the health insurance facility to the transgender community, saying they had been facing myriad social problems.

Mirza, during his address at the ceremony, said 6.8 million families had been provided the Sehat Insaf cards already, adding the government wanted to expand this safety net to 15 million deserving families by the end of next year.

He said the Sehat Sahulat program had been launched in 84 districts, and 300 private sector hospitals were providing health services to deserving people under it. On the prime minister’s directions, he said, Sehat Insaf cards had also been given to residents of Tharparkar and the tribal districts. Work is underway to provide these cards to residents of Pakistan-administered Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan also, he added.

Referring to the health insurance for transgenders, Mirza said the government had collected data about the community with the assistance of its leaders. Lauding the passage of the Transgender Protection Act last year, he said it ensured equal rights and sought to end discrimination in all societal sectors.

Reem Sharif, a transgender who works for a non-governmental organization in Islamabad, told state-run Associated Press of Pakistan that the Sehat Insaf Card was a step toward inclusivity for her community. She said transgenders often faced discrimination at hospitals and she hoped the cards would grant them equal rights of medical treatment at designated facilities across the country.

Muhammad Faisal Qureshi, a teenage transgender recently employed in the Pakistan Baitul Maal, also hailed the initiative, saying it would significantly raise their confidence in seeking medical care in case of any emergency.

A study conducted by the Forum of Dignity Initiatives and Blue Veins last year found that 78.75% respondents from the transgender community felt they lacked access to qualified health care providers. Additionally, 92% of the respondents reported facing some form of discrimination. Under the government’s program, it is believed this harassment would end and transgenders would be one step closer toward full inclusivity in Pakistan.

https://www.newsweekpakistan.com/pakistan-introduces-health-insurance-for-transgender/
 
Great initiative by PTI government, love how they take ownership initiatives of the most vulnerable of the Pakistani society.
 
Doctors in Pak always seem eager to give "teeka" or prescribe meds before any sort of proper diagnosis or investigations.
 
I wonder if there is a country on Earth who's residents don't complain about the poor standard of healthcare. I am in Ireland and the standard of healthcare (both in terms of waiting lists and quality of practitioners) is just horrible.
 
<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Congratulations to Khyber Pukhtunkwa for giving health insurance cover to all those with a KP domicile. This is a huge step towards making Pakistan a welfare state based on Riyasat e Madina. <a href="https://t.co/ronM62pbN3">pic.twitter.com/ronM62pbN3</a></p>— Imran Khan (@ImranKhanPTI) <a href="https://twitter.com/ImranKhanPTI/status/1322916426559213568?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 1, 2020</a></blockquote>
<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
 
In just 40 days since the inception of the Health Card initiative in Balochistan, an impressive 8,217 patients have already benefited from free medical treatment. This significant milestone was revealed by Amir Mohammad Khan Jogizai, the Caretaker Provincial Health Minister, during a press conference at the Quetta Press Club. The program, operational in 150 hospitals across various provinces of the country, has become a beacon of hope for those in need.

Jogizai highlighted the success of the initiative, citing a daily average of 205 patients availing themselves of medical services. Notably, 18 per cent of patients received treatment in government hospitals, while the remaining 82 per cent sought care in private healthcare facilities. This inclusive approach ensures that individuals from all walks of life have access to quality healthcare in the province.

The financial commitment to the health card initiative currently stands at Rs320 million, underscoring the caretaker government’s dedication to prioritizing the health and well-being of its citizens.

Source: Express Tribune

 
‘Air ambulance service to roll out from June’

Taking to X (formerly Twitter), the Punjab chief minister said the training session for Pakistan’s first air ambulance service has been commenced.

“The air ambulance project in Punjab has been completed in record time,” Maryam Nawaz noted.

First female Punjab Chief Minister Maryam Nawaz had made an announcement of launch of the ambulance service within weeks in her maiden address at the Punjab Assembly.

Earlier in March, the Punjab cabinet approved the project, marking a significant step forward in emergency medical services.

Under this initiative, there is a plan to initially get two aircraft on lease. These ambulances will be equipped to transport doctors, paramedics, and essential medical equipment, along with life-saving medicines.

The air machines are designed to operate from short runways. They will also have the capability to land and take off from national highways and motorways.

 
Financial irregularities unearthed at Lahore’s Services Hospital

The Punjab Health Department formed an inquiry committee to investigate the financial irregularities in the purchase and sale of various goods from 2022 to 2024.

The committee, comprising four members from the health department, including convener Tania Malik and member Jawad Malik, has been tasked with examining the situation.

The inquiry committee has been given a timeframe of seven days to submit its recommendations to the health department.

Meanwhile, those responsible for the irregularities, including the MS, Director of Finance, and Cashier, will be liable to respond to the inquiry committee.

Last year, a junior clerk of the Services Hospital Lahore namely Arshad Butt turned out to be a millionaire.

The ACE launched a probe against the Punjab Paramedical Staff Association President Arshad Butt who had been appointed as a junior clerk – Grade IV government employee – in Services Hospital Lahore based on fake degrees.

During the investigation, it was revealed that the junior clerk is a millionaire whose monthly salary is just Rs57,000. The ACE investigators obtained five-year records of the accused.

During the past eight months, transactions worth Rs11 million were made into his bank account. Additionally, the accused owns an 18 kanal and 18 marlas land commercial property, whereas, two houses are under his wife’s ownership.

Further investigation revealed that Arshad Butt has also established a private laboratory near the Services Hospital in the Shadman area.

“An employee of the government hospital namely Abdus Samad is tasked to bring the patients to Butt’s private lab for sample collections. Later, the samples were tested at the Services Hospital’s laboratory at the government’s expense.”

 
As Last year, a junior clerk of the Services Hospital Lahore turned out to be a millionaire. What will they answer to Allah?
 
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