[VIDEO] Tagenarine Chanderpaul, son of Shivnarine, impressing with his performances

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Tagenarine Chanderpaul, the 26-year-old son of Shivnarine, has been called up to the West Indies Test squad for the first time.

Tagenarine has previously represented West Indies Under 19s. Shivnarine is the eighth highest run-scorer in the history of Test cricket.
 
ST JOHN’S, Antigua – West Indies cricket legend Shivnarine Chanderpaul was announced as one of the new members of International Cricket Council’s (ICC) Hall of Fame on Tuesday afternoon in Australia (Monday night Caribbean Time). He has joined the list of fellow cricketing icons who have received this prestigious honour. The ICC announced Chanderpaul will be inducted in the Hall of Fame alongside Pakistan legendary leg-spinner Abdul Qadir and England trailblazer Charlotte Edwards.

The left-handed Chanderpaul played at the international level for over to two decades and is among the leading run-scorers in the game’s history. He made his Test debut in 1994 at age 19 against England at Bourda in his native Guyana. He played 164 Test matches – the most by a West Indian – and scored 11,867 runs at an average of 51.37, which included 30 centuries.

He also played 268 One-Day Internationals and made 8,778 runs with 11 centuries at an average of 41.60; while in 22 T20 Internationals he made 343 runs. His first-class career was outstanding with 27,545 runs in 385 matches at an average of over 53. He had 77 centuries including a career-best of 303 not out for Guyana against Jamaica.

Cricket West Indies (CWI) President and ICC Director, Ricky Skerritt, paid tribute to Chanderpaul.

“On behalf of all West Indies cricket stakeholders, I congratulate Shivnarine ‘Shiv’ Chanderpaul for receiving the highest honor of his career to date. Shiv’s story exemplifies all that is good about him and the game of cricket – his hard work, commitment, adaptability and his resulting growth and achievements on and off the field. His love for the game is unmatched, and he demonstrated throughout his two decades on the field that he was the man for all seasons.”

“From the early days in the Under-19 set-up in Guyana shiv showcased his immense batting talent. He honed his skills and worked tirelessly to become the number 1 ranked batsman in the world. He embodied the statement ‘heights of great men reach and kept were not attained by sudden flight’. Shiv toiled hard to improve and at every stage was able to re-invent his game to meet the demands. We salute Shiv for his immense contribution to West Indies cricket and world cricket.”

West Indians previously inducted into The ICC Hall of Fame: Sir Curtly Ambrose, Sir Learie Constantine, Joel Garner, Lance Gibbs, Sir Gordon Greenidge, Sir Wes Hall, the Most Hon. Desmond Haynes, George Headley, Michael Holding, Rohan Kanhai, Brian Lara, Sir Clive Lloyd, Malcolm Marshall, Sir Viv Richards, Sir Andy Roberts, Sir Garry Sobers, Courtney Walsh, Sir Clyde Walcott, Sir Everton Weekes, Sir Frank Worrell.
 
In line to follow his father's footsteps as a West Indies Test cricketer, a tough Australian initiation stands in front of Tagenarine Chanderpaul.

Making scores of 119 and 56 against a Prime Minister's XI boasting a bowling attack of several Australian internationals, the 26-year-old all but locked in his spot in the touring side's playing XI for the first Test match in Perth, beginning on Wednesday.

The left-hander will likely open the batting alongside captain Kraigg Brathwaite, a just reward for a prolonged stretch of runs in First Class cricket.

The runs in Canberra compliment an unbeaten hundred for West Indies A on a recent tour of Bangladesh, on top of two centuries for his native Guyana, of which he has been a consistent contributor. Chanderpaul's 439 runs in the West Indies four-day competition is only bettered by his skipper's 584.

Tagenarine's First Class average of 35.55 might not jump off the page, with the figures telling the tale of batters in the region forced to cut their teeth on slow surfaces. Nkrumah Bonner for example stands 24 innings into his Test career with an average of 37.47, a far cry from his 28.43 while building his game in Jamaican colours.

Tagenarine's early success in Australia bodes well for his international future, and his father Shivnarine, a recent ICC Hall of Fame inductee, says a good series Down Under can help him climb the ladder even quicker.

“It's not going to be easy in Australia. No other team has come here and done well,” Chanderpaul admitted to icc-cricket.com on the evening he was inducted into the ICC Hall of Fame.

“If you can do well against Australia, it is going to be a feather in his cap, and probably help him to propel his career.”

Shivnarine boasts a strong record in Test cricket against Australia, making 1649 runs at 49.96, with five centuries to his name. All five scores of three figures came at home however, with the left-hander unable to convert on Australian soil, making five fifties at an average of 30.20.

For Shivnarine though, it was challenging his game against the best, at the time an all-dominant Australian side, that primed him.

“I used to love playing against Australia, especially in the beginning of the year, because they push to raise your standards and if you can do well against them throughout the year, you will do well, because you’re playing at a different level.”

It's not difficult to see the parallels between the two at the crease, both facing up almost front on to the bowler and both placing a huge value on their wicket.

The pair batted together for Guyana when their respective careers overlapped, and Shivnarine says his technical philosophies of moving forward into the ball to prevent the head and eyes dropping were key values applied as his son moved through the ranks.

“He’s one of those guys who, when he gets a chance to get in, he’ll try and bat long."

“There’s a few other things he can work on, but he's got an opportunity now and hopefully he can grab it.”

At the other end though, Australia's attack stands as one of the world's best with red ball in hand, and will provide stiff opposition in their own backyard.

Mitchell Starc is just 13 wickets away from 300 in the format, and would become just the seventh Australian man to reach the milestone. Josh Hazlewood boasts 215 scalps at 25.92, while skipper Pat Cummins is one away from 200 Test wickets, claiming his victims at an average of just 21.66. Backing up the pace attack is off-spinner Nathan Lyon, only behind Shane Warne and Glenn McGrath for men to wear the Baggy Green in terms of wickets, with 438 to his name.

The two-Test series is part of the ICC World Test Championship, with action in Perth followed by an encounter at Adelaide Oval from 8 December.

https://www.icc-cricket.com/news/2919804
 
Tagenarine Chanderpaul's first Test innings.

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Seems to have his dads gritt and patients, hope he gets a 100 tomorrow.
 
For a moment I thought his name was Tangerine Chanderpaul
 
Did You Know? Tagenarine Chanderpaul Acted In A Hindi Movie Before Test Debut For West Indies

Tagenarine Chanderpaul, son for West Indies great Shivnarine Chanderpaul, has made his Test debut against Australia in the first Test in Perth. After Australia declared on 598/4 in the first innings on Thursday, the junior Chanderpaul opened the innings for West Indies and scored a fluent 47 off 73 balls on the second day of the match. He and fellow opener Kraigg Brathwaite took some nasty blows to the groin and body. But they defiantly clung on to get to the close on 74-0, 524 runs adrift.

Chanderpaul, however, had grabbed the headlines a few months back when he posted a selfie with Deepika Padukone and Ranveer Singh. He played the part of Larry Gomes in Kapil Dev's biopic '83', where Ranveer was in the lead role. Chanderpaul's IMDb profile says, "Tagenarine Chanderpaul was born on May 31, 1996 in Georgetown, Guyana. He is an actor, known for '83 (2021). Debut in Hindi film 83 by playing character of Larry Gomes. Son of West Indies cricketer Shivnarine Chanderpaul."

The left-handed batter had the entire cricket fraternity in awe when he came out to bat as his batting stance was almost a carbon copy of that of his father.

Shivnarine Chanderpaul was known for his unusual batting stance and for his son to have the same stance is something that left event the fans bewildered.

Tagenarine took on the Australian pace attack hitting four boundaries and a six against them despite being hit on the body early in the innings. The fans were left amazed by the similarity between the father-son duo and poured their views out on Twitter.

NDTV
 
A maiden Test ton for Tagenarine Chanderpaul as the Windies openers put on a double century stand
 
The guys literally the second coming of his dad. What a story
 
6 hundreds in 54 first class games and an average in mid 30s doesnt bode well long term, he new to the international game and teams haven't honed in on his weaknesses yet.

would be surprised if he manages to average above 40 long term, but tbh as an opener even mid 30s would be good for WI.
 
6 hundreds in 54 first class games and an average in mid 30s doesnt bode well long term, he new to the international game and teams haven't honed in on his weaknesses yet.

would be surprised if he manages to average above 40 long term, but tbh as an opener even mid 30s would be good for WI.

He is good by modern day West Indies standard. Most Windies players don't seem interested in Test cricket.
 
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6 hundreds in 54 first class games and an average in mid 30s doesnt bode well long term, he new to the international game and teams haven't honed in on his weaknesses yet.

would be surprised if he manages to average above 40 long term, but tbh as an opener even mid 30s would be good for WI.
West Indies pitches are awful just check the amount of low quality spinner averaging in teens there. If he has his dad temperament he will go far.
 
Well done.

I know the opponent is just Zimbabwe (they are missing Sikandar Raza too) but you still have to be good to score a Test double century.
 
Given they haven't found a stable opening partnership for years and their frequent batting collapses, WI need someone like Tage Chanderpaul.

The openers can effectively blunt the new ball, set a platform and allow the middle-order strokeplayers like Mayers and Holder to play their natural game.
 
If Chanderpaul jr is anywhere near the player his father was, he will be some cricketer.

Shiv wasn't pleasing on the eye, but boy did he put a price on his wicket and make it tough for the bowlers to get him out.

Met him and interviewed Shiv when he was playing for Lancashire - a quiet and humble guy.
 
Not for the first time a Guyanese batsman struggles in bouncy Australian conditions.

His dad only averaged 30 down under. Tage is currently averaging worse than that.
 
I'm very impressed with his approach. Never easy on your first tour of Australia. Still early days but would surely get better.
 
Not for the first time a Guyanese batsman struggles in bouncy Australian conditions.

His dad only averaged 30 down under. Tage is currently averaging worse than that.
Clive Lloyd was Guyanese and was quite good on Aussie pitches.
 
Him and Brathwaite are a bane on Windies cricket. How much worse could someone hitters be worse than the painful tripe these 2 serve up
 
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