Egyptians shooting themselves in the foot?

Eagle_Eye

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Are they sleep walking towards a civil war Algeria style?

Brotherhood may not be liked by many but majority still voted them in. They are setting a bad precedent for one agrieved party to continue protsting until it gets their way even though they lost the popular vote.

There will be no winners here and everyone will lose. Army will come in and everything will go back to square one!
 
They voted him in. If they don't like him, vote him out.

These protests are just bad for the country. Highly illogical.
 
These protesters are a disgrace, trashing the Muslim Brotherhood's offices. If there are legitimate grievances, air them peacefully and not through violent thuggery. These are pro-Mubarak thugs who have no interest in 'secularism' or democracy contrary to what is being reported.

Morsi was democratically elected, vote him out at the next election for goodness sake but Morsi cannot even take a breath without thousands camping out in Tahrir Square.

What's wrong with these people, do they want the military to come marching in again to conquer their own country ?
 
Must respect the democratic process and mandate, seems like they do not want to trust the will of the people.

Wait for next elections, Campaign vigorously and convince more people of your point of view!
 
These protesters are a disgrace, trashing the Muslim Brotherhood's offices. If there are legitimate grievances, air them peacefully and not through violent thuggery. These are pro-Mubarak thugs who have no interest in 'secularism' or democracy contrary to what is being reported.

Morsi was democratically elected, vote him out at the next election for goodness sake but Morsi cannot even take a breath without thousands camping out in Tahrir Square.

What's wrong with these people, do they want the military to come marching in again to conquer their own country ?

Military chief gives 48 hrs to sort it out and heed the will of the people.

Who the hell gave him that authority?

Seems like this is all well planned from within the military.
 
The military are completely and utterly in the pockets of the US. I don't think there is a military in the world, even Pakistan's, that isn't as much of a poodle than the Egyptian military is, which has been bankrolled for decades by the US who have backed the former dictatorship, propped up by the security establishment.
 
^ not far from mqm logic either

More like altaf bhai logic who blame every wrong thing in karachi on others.

lol where did altaf hussain or mqm even come up!

get over with the obsession....

you guys have an mqm-phobia it seem.. more concerned abt karachi than karachiites themselves...

dont worry.. we'll keep paying the 50% plus taxes to run the country so be happy
 
No doubt with US promptings. Can't have Israel being compromised with it kicking off on their other borders.
 
Morsi is a zionist puppet, so called Islamic brotherhood first thing he does when he get's elected is apply for an IMF loan.
 
Morsi is a zionist puppet, so called Islamic brotherhood first thing he does when he get's elected is apply for an IMF loan.

not that i am denying your allegation but what does imf loan have anyhting to do with that...

there was no other option to take a loan for them just like there wasnt for PML-N. I despise pml-n but in this case there was no other option to make the payments..
 
Wait don't they have a democracy now? I think somebody needs to explain to them how it works.
 
not that i am denying your allegation but what does imf loan have anyhting to do with that...

there was no other option to take a loan for them just like there wasnt for PML-N. I despise pml-n but in this case there was no other option to make the payments..

That loan has done nothing for the Egyptian people unemployment has risen, inflation has risen, IMF loan is slavery so called Islamic leaders can not see this.
 
That loan has done nothing for the Egyptian people unemployment has risen, inflation has risen, IMF loan is slavery so called Islamic leaders can not see this.

how do you suggest to pay the interest and other existing payments for which there is no money in the treasury?
 
how do you suggest to pay the interest and other existing payments for which there is no money in the treasury?

Unfortunately The first leader that took the loan has ensured slavery on the people, but if it means destroying the already dead economy than imo it is a price to pay in order to break away from the slavery.
 
Morsi is a zionist puppet, so called Islamic brotherhood first thing he does when he get's elected is apply for an IMF loan.

What was he supposed to do, Mubarak, his son and his cronies looted the damn country.
 
Actually the majority didnt vote him in...the majority didnt vote in the first place...
 
Unfortunately The first leader that took the loan has ensured slavery on the people, but if it means destroying the already dead economy than imo it is a price to pay in order to break away from the slavery.

I usually agree with many of your thoughts....

But as an economist .... I must disagree with you.

You have to wean yourself off...


Morsi has done many things well but in reality the biggest mistake he made was getting into bed with the wahabi crew.
 
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Actually the majority didnt vote him in...the majority didnt vote in the first place...

The majority of UK voters didn't vote for the Conservatives here in the last election. Same goes for many countries using FPTP electoral system. The problem is with the FPTP system that Egypt uses rather than Morsi who is being threatened by thugs who have no interest in democracy, their ransacking of the Muslim Brotherhood's offices in Cairo is testament to that.
 
They voted him in. If they don't like him, vote him out.

These protests are just bad for the country. Highly illogical.

These protesters are a disgrace, trashing the Muslim Brotherhood's offices. If there are legitimate grievances, air them peacefully and not through violent thuggery. These are pro-Mubarak thugs who have no interest in 'secularism' or democracy contrary to what is being reported.

Morsi was democratically elected, vote him out at the next election for goodness sake but Morsi cannot even take a breath without thousands camping out in Tahrir Square.

What's wrong with these people, do they want the military to come marching in again to conquer their own country ?

Must respect the democratic process and mandate, seems like they do not want to trust the will of the people.

Wait for next elections, Campaign vigorously and convince more people of your point of view!

Wait don't they have a democracy now? I think somebody needs to explain to them how it works.

These are all fair points - violent protests won't achieve anything here other than anarchy on streets.

That said, just because someone has been voted into power it shouldn't mean people have to wait until the next election before they can air their grievances. Peaceful protesting is very much a democratic right. And historically it has brought about a change in policy many a time.
 
These are all fair points - violent protests won't achieve anything here other than anarchy on streets.

That said, just because someone has been voted into power it shouldn't mean people have to wait until the next election before they can air their grievances. Peaceful protesting is very much a democratic right. And historically it has brought about a change in policy many a time.

This is not like a peaceful protest the way we understand it. Its orchestrtaed anarchy to topple a democratic system. The protestors and the army succeed in what they want, next time, brotherhood and its millions will be out on the street and round and round we go.

Egyptians have to lette the democratic system settle and suck it up for a while, whatever the system throws up.
 
And whose fault is that?

They saw the whole process as a joke so didnt vote...

Its all and well blaming people for not voting but when there is such a low turnout you have to ask why...

Morsi was an awful candidate and only just managed to beat a pro Mubarak candidate...thats how much support he lacked...
 
They saw the whole process as a joke so didnt vote...

Its all and well blaming people for not voting but when there is such a low turnout you have to ask why...

Morsi was an awful candidate and only just managed to beat a pro Mubarak candidate...thats how much support he lacked...

if they wanted better candidates they should have voted for them in the first stage

The arguments you use could be used for any country

The difference between the mb have not used any violence against the protestors, have tried again and again to negotiate with them and have failed precisely because they are seen as weak and pragmatic

For not letting the country descend into civil war and sticking to the law, they have allowed themselves to be bullied by the opposition

I do think they should step down now and let egypt rot from within
 
They saw the whole process as a joke so didnt vote...

Its all and well blaming people for not voting but when there is such a low turnout you have to ask why...

Morsi was an awful candidate and only just managed to beat a pro Mubarak candidate...thats how much support he lacked...

The point is, awful candidate or not, he was elected democratically and if they don't like him, they should vote him out. At the most they should protest peacefully. These violent protests aren't progressive and only benefit countries which want Egypt to be riddled with civil war. Like Markhor said, the protesters are engaging in a form of thuggery. Air your grievances, but don't become the problem.
 
The point is, awful candidate or not, he was elected democratically and if they don't like him, they should vote him out. At the most they should protest peacefully. These violent protests aren't progressive and only benefit countries which want Egypt to be riddled with civil war. Like Markhor said, the protesters are engaging in a form of thuggery. Air your grievances, but don't become the problem.

I do agree to a degree...the end result cold be rhe army coming in which wont be nice...I agree also that protests should remain nonviolent...

This shouldnt detract however from the fact that Egyptians on the whole felt the whole 'democratic' process was a sham...and Morsi has been an awful leader...referring to the protesters as Shaytan is hardly a good step...

So few people liked him in the first place and hes done nothing to bring them around since taking power...and everything to alienate everyone...

This isn't as simple as Islam v secularism...far from it...
 
Egypt is finished. These stupid people will now reap what they sow. Sometiems one has to dela with things with resiliance and akal. Our population in both the UK and pakistan seem like super geniuses compared to this stupid country! They have opened the door to anarchy and destruction.

after a few eyars we will then hear the tragic stories of deatha nd murder and they will cry for aid.

They have been oppressed for so long that they have almost made this form of demonstration a national pastime! wake up you stupid Muslims before its too late!
 
Egypt is finished. These stupid people will now reap what they sow. Sometiems one has to dela with things with resiliance and akal. Our population in both the UK and pakistan seem like super geniuses compared to this stupid country! They have opened the door to anarchy and destruction.

after a few eyars we will then hear the tragic stories of deatha nd murder and they will cry for aid.

They have been oppressed for so long that they have almost made this form of demonstration a national pastime! wake up you stupid Muslims before its too late!

What did Lawrence of Arabia say about the region?
 
It was a very flawed election process - this is what a lot don't understand.

It's easy to say Morsi won the election, but a lot of people boycotted the sham election because it was either him or someone who had close ties to the old regime.

Lets remember 1 thing it was not the Muslim brotherhood supporters that toppled Mubaraks regime - they cleverly took advantage of the situation when it mattered.

Also Morsi and his Brotherhood supporters have stuffed down a constitution that totally favours what his Islamist supporters want, not what is fair and good for the whole of Egypt.
He has been there 1 year, what has improved ? Nothing, if anything the country has gone backwards.
Example people are waiting 3 to 4 hours just to fill petrol for thier cars.

A lot of people are frustrated, hence the mass protests.
However they should be peaceful. Violence will only cost the country, especially the tourist trade.
 
You either back democracy or you don't. We have had similar outcries over rigging in the elections in Pakistan but the process has to start somewhere. Mass protests is going to lead to the army stepping in and then the same idiots will not dare to go on the streets unless they want a rubber bullet between the eyes. What will they have achieved then?
 
It was a very flawed election process - this is what a lot don't understand.

It's easy to say Morsi won the election, but a lot of people boycotted the sham election because it was either him or someone who had close ties to the old regime.

Lets remember 1 thing it was not the Muslim brotherhood supporters that toppled Mubaraks regime - they cleverly took advantage of the situation when it mattered.

Also Morsi and his Brotherhood supporters have stuffed down a constitution that totally favours what his Islamist supporters want, not what is fair and good for the whole of Egypt.
He has been there 1 year, what has improved ? Nothing, if anything the country has gone backwards.
Example people are waiting 3 to 4 hours just to fill petrol for thier cars.

A lot of people are frustrated, hence the mass protests.
However they should be peaceful. Violence will only cost the country, especially the tourist trade.

the brotherhood were theere and fully participated. they just kept their flags at home to prevent the west labelling it as an islamist revolution. Without the MB mubarak would not have left. their cadres were in the demo's.

as for things improving well im not totally clued up on what morsi hasnt done but surely people must be a little patient after so much turmoil? also parliamentary elections are due too.
 
Yes they are . What the hell do they want ? these guys ate democratically elected . If you didn't want them in power then why did they win the elections ? and if you chose not to vote in my view you have no right to complain .
 
Yes they are . What the hell do they want ? these guys ate democratically elected . If you didn't want them in power then why did they win the elections ? and if you chose not to vote in my view you have no right to complain .

Turkmenistan had elections too...doesnt mean anything...if the process is flawed then people wont bother...do you think Afghan elections serve a purpose?...

Most people realised that the army held the strings and no real change would occur and thus didnt vote...no candidates had anything to offer...and Morsi has proved that...hes been absolutely useless...Egyptians probably had it better under Mubarak than this idiot...
 
You either back democracy or you don't. We have had similar outcries over rigging in the elections in Pakistan but the process has to start somewhere. Mass protests is going to lead to the army stepping in and then the same idiots will not dare to go on the streets unless they want a rubber bullet between the eyes. What will they have achieved then?

Completely different cases, both.

Rigging is depriving people from choosing the govt. As is dictatorship. People shuold protest against rigging.

Egyptian govt is democratically elected. Not like they rigged the elections. So that's a different scenario altogether
 
The pro Morsi protesters seem to outnumbering the anti Morsi brigade today.

There is nothing wrong with protesting peacefully at any time against the leadership.

The anti Morsi protestors are made up of all sorts of people from secular liberals to Muslims who feel he has sold out, which he has.

As soon as the US backed the Muslim brotherhood the Egyptians and everybody else should have realised a dictator is only going to be replaced with a puppet.
 
The pro Morsi protesters seem to outnumbering the anti Morsi brigade today.

There is nothing wrong with protesting peacefully at any time against the leadership.

The anti Morsi protestors are made up of all sorts of people from secular liberals to Muslims who feel he has sold out, which he has.

As soon as the US backed the Muslim brotherhood the Egyptians and everybody else should have realised a dictator is only going to be replaced with a puppet.

He has little support to be frank...he had little support when he came in and most of that support has dissipated after his disastrous performance...

It takes a lot to make Mubarak look good but Morsi has done his best to do that...
 
Turkmenistan had elections too...doesnt mean anything...if the process is flawed then people wont bother...do you think Afghan elections serve a purpose?...

Most people realised that the army held the strings and no real change would occur and thus didnt vote...no candidates had anything to offer...and Morsi has proved that...hes been absolutely useless...Egyptians probably had it better under Mubarak than this idiot...
So what your saying is Egypt = Pakistan of a few years ago ?
 
He has little support to be frank...he had little support when he came in and most of that support has dissipated after his disastrous performance...

It takes a lot to make Mubarak look good but Morsi has done his best to do that...

Millions were out in support of him all over Egypt today. Some back him and others are against their new 'democracy' being threatened.

Reminds me a little of how Obama fooled the American people, Morsi is about take a huge IMF loan, still sells subsidised gas to Israeli's when his own people are paying more, basically become a total puppet like Mubarak. Egypt is just too important a place strategically to be left to it's own devices.
 
The Army have taken over Egyptian State Television. Preparations for a coup ?
 
Indeed the Army is planning to take over after a well planned coup.

I have not followed Egypt closely, what has morsi done and not done to draw such ire?
 
The best way of getting rid of Islamists is to let them try to govern and when they prove incompetent vote them out. That would get rid of them forever, but toppling them will just vindicate them, and Egypt will be in the same position again in a few years time.
 
The best way of getting rid of Islamists is to let them try to govern and when they prove incompetent vote them out. That would get rid of them forever, but toppling them will just vindicate them, and Egypt will be in the same position again in a few years time.

Like the Taliban government in Afghanistan?
 
The best way of getting rid of Islamists is to let them try to govern and when they prove incompetent vote them out. That would get rid of them forever, but toppling them will just vindicate them, and Egypt will be in the same position again in a few years time.
this. I feel Pakistanis have done lot better than Egyptians in this regard.
 
Reported that unidentified gunmen in Cairo on Tuesday night fired on a pro-Morsi demonstration killing 16 people. A government spokesman said earlier that a 'coup is underway'.
 
Oh this is getting very serious. According to Channel 4, the Army about to announce Morsi's removal any minute but the Army is denying it. Tanks are being deployed around pro-Morsi demonstrations.
 
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Lol troops welcomed in this neighbourhood. Typical, a military ruler leaves behind a huge mess, Muslim country as usual as the memory of a goldfish, don't give the civilian government a chance and then celebrate when the military returns only to be subjected to a few more decades of tyranny.
 
Army just announced on state TV that Morsi has been informed he is no longer president...
 
It was an attempt at in "Islamic" government.

Appreciate it wasn't democratic.

Common sense fails you once again.

Why not just say, I made a stupid comment, which we are all inclined to do evrey now and then rather than come and and justify your apple to oranges comparison.
 
All those in the west who are celebrating-be careful what you wish for. A democratically elected Govt is overthrown on the behest of demonstrators, what if the MB come out onto the streets-will the next govt face the same fate.
 
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Common sense fails you once again.

Why not just say, I made a stupid comment, which we are all inclined to do evrey now and then rather than come and and justify your apple to oranges comparison.

Chill Bro. Why the anger?

It wasn't the greatest comment but thought I'd explain the extent of its usefulness.
 
MB took 80 years to achieve power they should be mature enough to accept that they have been screwed over and simply prepare for next elections. Problems in Egypt are so bad it may require a National Reconciliation Government or coalition to sort out. Either way it could be a good election/coup to lose.

Being out of the shitstorm can be very good. Note how suddenly Umar Akmal, Haris Sohail and Ahmed Shehzad went from zeros to saviours of Pak cricket after Malik, Kakmal and Farhat stunk out the joint in Champions Trophy.

It further just illustrates the lies and hypocrisy of those in the West who claim all they want is 'democracy' but don't practice what they preach.
 
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Chill Bro. Why the anger?

It wasn't the greatest comment but thought I'd explain the extent of its usefulness.

I think bringing the Taliban into the discussion just confused the issue as the discussion was about the repercussions on democracy, not specifically about the the nature of the elected party. If the govt was so unpopular they would have lost the next election anyway so their failure would have been rubber stamped by the public. Now they have been turned into martyrs and the future of democracy in the middle east has been thrown into doubt.
 
I think bringing the Taliban into the discussion just confused the issue as the discussion was about the repercussions on democracy, not specifically about the the nature of the elected party. If the govt was so unpopular they would have lost the next election anyway so their failure would have been rubber stamped by the public. Now they have been turned into martyrs and the future of democracy in the middle east has been thrown into doubt.

Noted and agreed.

Was just saying that the last attempt at an islamic government didn't go too well....

Happy to withdraw the comment.
 
A judge is now the interim head of state, the constitution is temporarily suspended and a technocratic government will be formed until elections are held. This is ridiculous, what precedent does this set for the future ? If there are protests and the generalsdon't like the leader, then the democratically elected government must fall ? There could be a return to an Islamist insurgency as happened before in Egypt in the 1990s between Mubarak and radical groups. The Muslim Brotherhood has a code of non-violence but this could encourage more radical elements to wage conflict. However the media painting this as secularists vs Islamists is nonsense, these protests are mainly borne out of the economic collapse that has occurred.
 
Noted and agreed.

Was just saying that the last attempt at an islamic government didn't go too well....

Happy to withdraw the comment.

Islamic governments which are based on turning the clock back 1400 years are destined to fail, if anything they are more likely to be successful out of power as then they don't have any responsibility to deal with real life practical issues and can thrive on slogans and rhetoric. Theology is best left in churches and mosques in my view, but toppling an elected government has now handed the religious right a moral victory where previously it was probably heading nowhere.
 
You either back democracy or you don't. We have had similar outcries over rigging in the elections in Pakistan but the process has to start somewhere. Mass protests is going to lead to the army stepping in and then the same idiots will not dare to go on the streets unless they want a rubber bullet between the eyes. What will they have achieved then?

What is impeachment? Seems like the people are genuinely upset with Morsi.
 
Immediate result of coup. US will have to 'review' $1bn+ aid to Egypt. So coming to 12 hours into the great new dawn maybe protests should start against military government.

Army already seem to be going against their US masters by detaining MB figures.
 
It further just illustrates the lies and hypocrisy of those in the West who claim all they want is 'democracy' but don't practice what they preach.

Dont bring the West into this.

This was a regional "uprising", and the opponents of the govt were supported, directly or indirectly, by SA, Iran, Syria etc.
Already many Saudis are gloating how they will ensure the entire middle east only consist of those supporting them.
 
Sometime ago I read a very good article about the influence and control of the military over every aspect of Egyptian society.

According to the article, the officers are relatively low paid, but are virtually guaranteed top jobs with lucrative benefits after they retire.

Every civilian post of any note, from mayors in small local villages to the govt. and council officials in every town and city throughout Egypt consists of retired Army officers.

Similarly, virtually every senior post, from Chairman, CEO, Board members and senior managers, in publicly owned companies, from utility firms to airport authorities, is occupied by a retired army officer, and this applies even to some privately owned companies, such as defence contractors and those supplying goods and services to local and national government departments. Many of these companies are even owned by the Army or ex Army officers.

This setup ensures that no matter what government is in power in Egypt, the 'old boy' network of ex Army officers ultimately decides what does and does not get done. And with low pay but guaranteed top jobs after they retire, the Army ensures there is no internal discord amongst the serving officer class.
 
Power flows through the barrel of the gun - as simple as that. If people are unhappy then army is welcomed with open arms something that our politicians in Pakistan never understood till today and Egypt proves it once again.
 
They shot themselves in the foot when they elected Morsi. Now they are redeeming themselves.

Message is loud and clear. They want to be a secular republic with all interest groups protected. Power to them.
 
Power flows through the barrel of the gun - as simple as that. If people are unhappy then army is welcomed with open arms something that our politicians in Pakistan never understood till today and Egypt proves it once again.
Morsi was blamed for rising food and fuel prices due to abolition of subsidies, which was a condition of the IMF loans that Egypt needed due to the state of the economy that Morsi inherited when he became President.

The economy is not going to improve overnight now that the Army is in control again - after all it was due to them that Morsi inherited a virtually bankrupt economy in the first place.

Soon the protesters are going to realise that the Army will now see them as a threat, as the Army generals will not risk the same protesters taking to the streets again when they realise that they are back to the old Army-ruled Mubarak days all over again, only this time with a puppet regime wearing a civilian face.

The generals used the protesters to get rid of Mubarak,as he had become a liability due to being the visible face of their rule over the decades.

The generals have now used the protesters to justify getting rid of a democratically elected President, elected via an election that was recognised as being free and fair.

The generals will now see the same protesters as a threat to themselves and their puppets.
 
They shot themselves in the foot when they elected Morsi. Now they are redeeming themselves.

Message is loud and clear. They want to be a secular republic with all interest groups protected. Power to them.
And the next time a President gets elected who does not satisfy those who voted for the other candidates (or did not vote at all) ? Get the Army to come and get rid of him again?

In other words, democracy is ok, as long as it elects someone that is on the side of the urban city dwellers and elitist middle class?

Sure, there were big protests against Morsi in Cairo and some of the big cities - presumably by the city dwellers. But what about the wishes of the millions and millions of those living in small towns and villages up and down the country who are on the side of Morsi?

Or does only the voices of an educated few, in places like Cairo, matter as to who is in power?
 
And the next time a President gets elected who does not satisfy those who voted for the other candidates (or did not vote at all) ? Get the Army to come and get rid of him again?

In other words, democracy is ok, as long as it elects someone that is on the side of the urban city dwellers and elitist middle class?

Sure, there were big protests against Morsi in Cairo and some of the big cities - presumably by the city dwellers. But what about the wishes of the millions and millions of those living in small towns and villages up and down the country who are on the side of Morsi?

Or does only the voices of an educated few, in places like Cairo, matter as to who is in power?

That is the concern. But I believe the ouster of Morsi was not called for because his non performance only. He was clearly taking an authoritarian fundamentalist approach to running the state. Not to mention the constitutional amendments and really perception of working only for his supporters and party.

Nonetheless, people in Tunisia, Turkey and Egypt seem to be in unison about the nature of govt. they seek.
 
That is the concern. But I believe the ouster of Morsi was not called for because his non performance only. He was clearly taking an authoritarian fundamentalist approach to running the state. Not to mention the constitutional amendments and really perception of working only for his supporters and party.
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Only because the all those appointed by the previous regime were still in key positions in the judiaciary and every other institution, and were hell bent on ensuring that, despite losing the elections, they and their supporters still dicated who runs the country, even to the extent of not allowing a democratically elected Parliament not to sit.
 
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The generals will now see the same protesters as a threat to themselves and their puppets.

I dotn think the people care much.
All the army has to do is do what it did before and now; come and give a speech praising the "great Egyptian people", and they will set off firecrackers and celebrate it.
 
I dotn think the people care much.
All the army has to do is do what it did before and now; come and give a speech praising the "great Egyptian people", and they will set off firecrackers and celebrate it.
Until they realise that food and fuel prices will still keep going up, the economy will still keep going down, and any dissent will be stamped upon - as it used to be during the Mubarak era. Lets see if the Army will also allow peaceful protests, as the Morsi regime did, if the protesters start rallying against the Army in a few months time
 
Very good posts by Javelin in this thread :hatoff

The army is the real problem in Egypt and not any civilian Government. The army holds all the power.

Interesting to see Elbaradie, a former UN man taking part in ensuring a democratically elected Government is toppled by the military.

Some people still do not seem to understand that MB has lot of support in Egypt. There are millions who support them and voted for them, around 13 million people voted for him. Y In the previous parliamentary elections, around 18 million voted for MB and its allied parties. Its not like Pakistan where religious parties only get few seats in the KP and Balochistan, MB is very well entrenched in Egyptian society. This coup will now entrench their support further.

Cairo has a population of 20 million, even if 1 million vocal are on the streets, that is still only 5% of the city.

The fear now is that the blueprint is set.... get 300,000 - 500,000 mobilized on the streets and cause disruption till you get your way.
 
Only because the all those appointed by the previous regime were still in key positions in the judiaciary and every other institution, and were hell bent on ensuring that, despite losing the elections, they and their supporters still dicated who runs the country, even to the extent of not allowing a democratically elected Parliament not to sit.

This was not a 10 day affair. This has been brewing for more than 6 months now. Please tell me what measures Morsi has taken to address the concerns of those people. And this is not some minority we are talking about. You further antagonize them and reveal dictatorial fundamentalist traits people will come on the streets. Just 5 days back Morsi said, he will lose his position over his dead body. If this is how he choses to deal with the overwhelming angst of his people, then he was asking for this reaction.
 
I do not follow Egyptian politics in detail.

But wasn't this govt elected by the public around a year back ? What is so bad about it that the same public wants it out desperately ?

1 year is too less time to even change your opinion on the govt that majority elected.
 
Shame on these Egyptians for not letting their country become the next Afghanistan or Pakistan.

Some of you posters complaining about this should go down to Tahrir Square and let these stooopid protesters know they are gonna be missing out on things like suicide bombings, beheadings, floggings and other such fun :)
 
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