Strategic similarities between Test Cricket and ODIs

FearlessRoar

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Test matches and ODIs might seem different, but if you look closely, you'll find some strategies that work well in both. In Test Cricket, where players need to plan for the long haul. Similarly, in ODIs, quick thinking and smart moves are crucial.

Being able to adapt is crucial whether you are facing lots of overs in Test cricket or chasing in a ODIs. Patience and innings building is the key in both formats.

I created this thread to discuss similarities between Test Cricket and ODIs.
 
Wasim Akram during program on A-Sports talks about why Test Cricket is important for ODIs:

"Now, see the teams who have reached the final (ICC ODI World Cup 2023). Now, why this format is important to me? Because this has a different mindset. In a way, for a batter and for T20, you just do 'Tha Tho'. In this, you have to build innings. And both finalists, one has 9 test players. One has 10 test players. Australia has 8, oh, sorry, Australia has 8 or 9, vice versa same for India. That shows in the end. Who plays longer format will perform well in one day on a regular basis. That's the fact.

Only, I think, one player I remember, in world cricket, who came as a T20 specialist and became one of the best in test cricket too. And that is David Warner."
 
Wasim Akram makes a solid point about the importance of Test Cricket for ODIs. Building an innings in Test matches requires a different mindset compared to T20Is. It's interesting for me to note that the teams reached to ICC ODI World Cup 2023 final have enough numbers of test players. Before listening to Wasim, i didn't notice this fact.
 
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Totally spot on — Atherton wrote on exactly this point in The Times
ODI is closer to Test cricket than T20, for both bowlers and batters.
It is a complete fallacy that T20 players will automatically become good ODI players, hence the nonsense of us g PSL as a basis for selecting ODI and Test squads
 
It's tricky. ODIs need players from tests and T20Is. A team needs players that can build an innings and also strike the ball. Some one who can set the batsmen up to take wickets but also bowl.well at the death.
 
Especially when the conditions are wildly different from ground to ground and you have only 15 members in the squad, you should cover all the bases. You never know which player will be needed when. This is why you see extreme highs and extreme lows from the same side.
 
But remember best bowlers can keep coming back at you in tests. They can bowl 20 to even 30 overs sometimes on dead pitches.

In odi it's limited to 10 each
 
Both formats require top-notch fitness to succeed. You cannot play these formats if you are not fit enough to field or bat throughout the day.
 
Wasim Akram during program on A-Sports talks about why Test Cricket is important for ODIs:

"Now, see the teams who have reached the final (ICC ODI World Cup 2023). Now, why this format is important to me? Because this has a different mindset. In a way, for a batter and for T20, you just do 'Tha Tho'. In this, you have to build innings. And both finalists, one has 9 test players. One has 10 test players. Australia has 8, oh, sorry, Australia has 8 or 9, vice versa same for India. That shows in the end. Who plays longer format will perform well in one day on a regular basis. That's the fact.

Only, I think, one player I remember, in world cricket, who came as a T20 specialist and became one of the best in test cricket too. And that is David Warner."
Using this argument, Asad Shafiq and Azhar Ali were drafted into the ODI team

Asad played around 60 ODIs with 22-23 average and 65 strike rate. Not in the 1970s, but in the 2010s. We gave him 60 ODIs. Imagine

Azhar was made captain and under him our ODI ranking went down to number 9. Again played with a pathetic strike rate

Also, Younis Khan got to play 250+ ODI matches with nothing substantial to show.
Our greatest ever Test batsman but the worst ODI batsman in our history- 31-32 average with a low 70s strike rate

Point being, someone who is good in test matches will NOT ALWAYS be good in ODIs like Wasim is implying

The 8-9 players he is talking about are ALL FORMAT PLAYERS. In our team,
Babar, Rizwan, Shaheen, Naseem are those

But format SPECIALIST players are also important

Younis Khan sucked In ODIs, but cannot be dropped In Tests because of that

Haris Sohail sucked in tests, but was a great ODI batsman
 
Both formats need patience and game awareness to drive the match, unlike T20 where one player's performance can change the course of the game with a fluke.
 
The finalists of the last T20 world cup were dumped out in the group stages and at many times failed to bat their full 50 overs.

One day cricket is the most balanced format of cricket, especially when played on helpful pitches.

In T20 cricket you don't have time to adapt. You need to ( in most cases) hit or get out.

In Test cricket you can try to see out a spell, survive the heat and then continue.

ODI produces a conundrum. Go on the attack recklessly and get out, your team is screwed. Block for a long time to see off a tough spell - your team is screwed.
 
There is only one strategic similarity between Tests and ODI - A batsman knowing when to accelerate/decelerate his innings.
 
Thank god for ODIs. Such an upgrade over T20s.

In essence, an ODI is a 1-day test with same ebbs and flows of a test match.

T20 is a blot on this great game.
 
The finalists of the last T20 world cup were dumped out in the group stages and at many times failed to bat their full 50 overs.

One day cricket is the most balanced format of cricket, especially when played on helpful pitches.

In T20 cricket you don't have time to adapt. You need to ( in most cases) hit or get out.

In Test cricket you can try to see out a spell, survive the heat and then continue.

ODI produces a conundrum. Go on the attack recklessly and get out, your team is screwed. Block for a long time to see off a tough spell - your team is screwed.

This. It requires dynamic players or at least a dynamic lineup with a mix of players especially in conditions that are not straightforward..

One paced teams like PAK and England got exposed
 
The beauty of Test Cricket is that we are open to all combinations. What is better than watching the new ball swing and the old ball turn !!!
 
Both require patience but in ODI cricket things get fast by the end of the inning that is the reason why this format is still in business.
 
ODI is the closest format to a single day of a test match. Those who play Tests can play ODIs as well and vice versa.
 
Test and ODI cricket are like the wheels and the car. Test cricket represents the wheel, while ODI cricket is the car, and both depend on each other. A cricketer plays Test cricket to test his techniques and patience. After five days of intensive cricket, when he transitions to ODI format, he is fully prepared for any condition. The challenges faced during those Test matches prepare him for varied situations in ODI matches, making it easier for him to tackle them based on his experience in red-ball cricket.

I believe that these wheels and the car should always be together, given their strong and deep similarities.
 
No similarities.
ODI cricket is basically defensive cricket while Tests are the opposite. The most important aspect in all the formats is the bowling. In ODIs bowlers main aim is to stop the flow of runs, majority of the time the field is spread to achieve this goal. In Tests you need wickets to win a game, here a bowler needs to be skillful and aggressive. More close in fielders with attacking fields.
Plus in Tests a captain needs to read the game well and make important decisions.
 
Both need patience to build the game according to the situation no like "Hara Huri" of T20 cricket
 
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