Pakistan U19s (179) bow out of the ICC U19 World Cup with a narrow 1-wicket defeat to Australia U19s (181/9) in the 2nd Semi-Final

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Australia and Pakistan both three-time champions, are set to clash in the thrilling second semi-final of the ICC U-19 Cricket World Cup on Thursday, February 8th, at Willowmoore Park in Benoni.

Pakistan remains unbeaten in the tournament, securing victories in all their group stage matches against Afghanistan, Nepal, and New Zealand. Under the leadership of Saad Baig, they continued their winning streak in the Super Six stages by defeating Ireland and Bangladesh, the latter being a tense encounter that saw the Boys in Green emerge victorious by a margin of five runs.

On the other hand, Australia topped their group with a perfect record, securing wins against Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe, and Namibia. In the Super Six stages, they overcame rivals England by 110 runs through the DLS method and earned a spot in the semi-finals, aided by a no-result outcome against West Indies. The stage is set for an intense battle between these cricketing powerhouses.


When: February 08, 1:00 PM PST

Where: Willowmoore Park, Benoni


Squads:

Australia U19 Squad: Lachlan Aitken, Harkirat Bajwa, Charlie Anderson, Mahli Beardman, Tom Campbell, Harry Dixon, Ryan Hicks, Sam Konstas, Rafael MacMillan, Aidan O’Connor, Harjas Singh, Tom Straker, Callum Vidler, Corey Wasley, Hugh Weibgen(c)

Pakistan U19 Squad: Shamyl Hussain, Shahzaib Khan, Azan Awais, Saad Baig(w/c), Haroon Arshad, Arafat Minhas, Ubaid Shah, Mohammad Zeeshan, Ahmad Hassan, Ali Asfand, Naveed Ahmed Khan, Ali Raza, Amir Hassan, Khubaib Khalil, Mohammad Riazullah


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Shahzaib attributes Pakistan’s unbeaten run at U19 World Cup to team unity

Pakistan's Shahzaib Khan opened up about his and the team’s journey at the ICC U19 Men’s Cricket World Cup 2024 ahead of their semi-final against Australia.

Pakistan have enjoyed a brilliant U19 World Cup campaign so far, winning five out of five games en route to the semi-finals.

One of the pillars of their campaign has been Shahzaib Khan, who has been the team’s highest run-getter and the fourth overall at the tournament with 260 runs in five matches.

A humble Shahzaib deflected the praise, attributing the team's triumph in the tournament to their unity.

“If you see our last game when the batting didn't click, the bowlers put their hands up,” Shahzaib said speaking to ICC Digital. When the bowlers have an off day, the batters pull the team up,” he added.

“It's a combination of these things that has led to our success. We play as a unit and we hope to continue doing so in the semi-final.”

The game Shahzaib was referring to was Pakistan's final Super Six game against Bangladesh, where both teams were in contention for a semi-final spot.

Having only 156 runs to defend, Pakistan bowlers pulled the team through with an exceptional bowling display to win the match in thrilling fashion by five runs.

“There was a bit of nerves when Bangladesh were chasing,” Shahzaib admitted. “It was a do-or-die match, a virtual knockout. We didn't have many runs on board but we knew that the wicket was difficult to bat on and that it would be challenging for Bangladesh to score those runs.

“We wanted to get early wickets and make the chase difficult for them. The pitch was such that it would be been difficult to score the runs despite it being a low score.

“It was a tough match but I feel this was our best performance among the five matches."

Shahzaib's focus will now be on the upcoming semi-final against Australia on Thursday. Pakistan are just two steps away from glory and a trophy that has eluded them for close to 20 years.

Pakistan last won the ICC U19 Men's Cricket World Cup in 2006 and came close in 2010 and 2014 when they reached the final.

Despite the challenges, Shahzaib underscores that the team's primary focus is on embracing their natural game, unshaken by the weight of history.

“We don't take any pressure, we are playing our natural game,” Shahzaib said. “We place equal importance on every match. We are putting our efforts into becoming champions this time around.

“I can't put into words the feeling of possibly winning the World Cup. For the country and the team, the feeling will be unparalleled if we end up winning.”

ICC
 
Expecting them to beat Aus U19 as Aus doesn’t even have BD U19 level bowling attack apart from Vidler only.
 
India Pakistan Final, a dream match up once again. Let's go boys, make it possible.
 
In Sha Allah the next gen of Pak cricketers will have nerves of steel and plenty of courage.

Bring it home.
 
A decade ago, a wide-eyed eight-year-old watched awestruck as a fearsome Mitchell Johnson curled up his moustache, stared down the English batters and returned with a bucketload of wickets in the home Ashes.

When Ryan Harris’ corker had Alastair Cook dismissed off the first ball of the innings in the Perth Test, that young boy made a decision. He wanted to steam in with the ball in hand, and just bowl fast.

Today Callum Vidler is doing just that. And doing it well. He’s making heads turn at the ICC U19 Men’s Cricket World Cup 2024, leading Australia’s wicket charts at the tournament. A large portion of Australia’s hopes of winning the title rests on him.

“It’s hard not to be inspired to become a fast bowler watching that as a young kid,” Vidler tells ICC.

“I thought to myself, ‘I want to do that’, you know? Bowl fast. Just run in and bowl fast. Watching them was my initial inspiration to take up cricket and fast bowling.”

Having been inspired to take up the ball by Johnson and Harris, Vidler went from backyard cricket through the ranks at Queensland, picking the brains of former Australia star Andy Bichel along the way, and more recently, Queensland’s Hamish Bennett.

“They have been helping me keep it nice and simple, and bowl my best ball and back myself to deliver and hopefully change a game,” he says.

Throughout his rise through age-group ranks, one thing remained constant – that love for fast bowling. It's the “whole point” of taking up fast bowling, says the young Australian tearaway: Bowling fast.

“If anyone ever tells me to slow down, I am not listening to them,” he says.

“Pace is my point of difference, my best attribute. I have also been learning to use it wisely, not having just pace, to swing the ball, using my variations and all. But if someone told me to slow down, it’s never working. The whole point is to bowl fast.”

Vidler says he clocked 143kph a few months before and believes he might be even faster now. He's also picked up a few things additionally, like learning to ruffle up batters with the short ball every once in a while or pitching it right up with the new ball in pursuit of swing.

In the Super Six fixture against England, Vidler dismantled the opposition within the first ten overs of the chase by picking up four wickets. With overcast conditions in Kimberley, Vidler pitched the ball up to dismiss Theo Wylie and Ben McKinney, and then used the surprise short ball to send back Noah Thain and Hamza Sheikh.

For someone who watched Johnson run in and bounce out batters with his intimidating pace, Vidler is a lot more subdued with his aggression. He aims to hit the right areas, attack the stumps and force errors with the odd variation in length. It’s what he did against England in what was his best performance in the tournament so far.

“In the first 10 overs I look to swing the ball and try and attack the stumps, but I also like using the bumper to surprise the batter and not get predictable with my length,” Vidler explains.

The youngster's discipline is evident from his numbers too. No bowler in the ongoing tournament has a better bowling average than Vidler’s 7.81. The 11 wickets he has taken has come at a miserly economy of 3.55.

Vidler, however, is quick to insist that that is a product of teamwork. “We have bowled our best when we have built pressure as a unit,” he says.

“Tom Straker, Charlie Anderson haven’t quite been lucky in the wickets department, but they have built the pressure. And Mahli [Beardman] and myself have been able to be rewarded with a few wickets. Early on, we want to build pressure by attacking the stumps and keeping the heat on.”

Johnson and Harris might have inspired Vidler to take up fast bowing, but the 18-year-old models himself around Australia captain Pat Cummins – the nice guy who turns up and devours batters with immaculate skill.

“In my younger teenage years, watching Pat Cummins, with his skill and pace, just being a class above everyone else, it’s inspired me and I definitely look up to him,” Vidler says.

He followed the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup final in India where Cummins led his side to a memorable title triumph and hopes to do something similar in South Africa with the junior team.

“Hopefully we can continue the track record of Australia doing great in ICC tournaments,” he says, adding that his immediate focus was on the semi-final against Pakistan.

His impeccable discipline with the ball and maturity on the field extends beyond cricket – Vidler is keen to pursue further studies alongside cricket. “My mom encourages me to keep studying and I put my head down at the final exams in school.

“It’s been crazy to then come over here and potentially play cricket for a living. I will be going back to study in the University and playing cricket alongside. I just want a course to fall back on because the competition is heavy and as a fast bowler, injuries are always a concern. It’s just the way it is.”

On Thursday, however, everything else will take a back seat as he goes up against a strong Pakistan side. It is a tough clash against a team that has come through difficult matches in the tournament, but Vidler believes that Australia’s strength – their bond and unity as a group – will see them through.

“You recall the first game against Namibia? We thought we had done pretty well with the ball,” he says. "Bowled them out for 90-odd runs. But then, in the run-chase, there were a bit of nerves.

“We wanted to probably chase it down quickly, but then wickets started falling. That was possibly our only hiccup in the batting department so far this tournament. But we came through that as a group. It won't happen again.”

The unity has been forged through tough tours and predicaments on and off the field. “Pretty much all of our squad members have known each other before. The tour of England - playing ODI and red-ball games against another U19 side helped a lot,” he says.

“It was the first away tour for cricket for a lot of us. You don’t just learn on the field with these trips, a lot of the learning happens off the field too. It’s helped the team bond, looking out for each other and ourselves on the tour.”

If unity is Australia’s strength, Pakistan will rely on strong individuals who have stepped up time and again in the tournament.

Vidler believes the pacer Ubaid Shah, in particular, will be a big threat. “Pakistan have an awesome pace attack,” Vidler says. “Ubaid, Naseem Shah’s brother, has been taking many wickets and stepping up in the big games.

“There are a few other tall guys, it's going to be a great battle. But we believe our quicks can out-do their fast bowlers. The battle between us and their batters will be an intriguing one.”

Does he want to send an early warning to the Pakistan batters? “We are very confident of winning the semis, but I am not going to send out any message to the Pakistan batters though,” Vidler laughs.

“We want to have a crack at their batters and stick to our skills. But no message. I don’t think I have any intimidation in me. I am not tall enough or scary enough. I just want to focus on my cricket.”

Given how the tournament has gone for him, that's all he needs to do.

ICC​
 
The second semi-final of the ICC U19 Men’s Cricket World Cup will feature two sides who’ve had their fair share of ups and downs in the competition.

From the prism of results, Australia and Pakistan have done little wrong. Both sides remain undefeated in the competition and have overcome feisty opponents like England, New Zealand, and Bangladesh.

But their respective journeys to the knockout stage have been far from smooth. Both teams had to overcome challenging phases of play in adverse circumstances, something that held especially true for Pakistan in their Super Six encounters.

While these jolts keep them battle-ready for the semi-finals, it also makes them aware of the areas that need improvement.

Australia and Pakistan are blessed with top-notch pace attacks and also have crafty spinners in their lineups. To add to that, their top-order batters have shown great form.

With immense talent in their ranks and a propensity to play positive cricket, a must-win contest between these two line-ups has all the makings of a nail-biter.

How they have fared so far

Australia


Form guide (in the tournament): NR W W W W
Hugh Weibgen’s side were grouped with Namibia, Zimbabwe and Sri Lanka.

Led by Callum Vidler, the pacers wreaked havoc in their opening encounter against Namibia, bowling out the African side for 91. However, Namibia’s fast bowlers stood tall and had Australia in a spot of bother at 57/5. A patient knock from skipper Weibgen halted Namibia’s momentum and saw them through by four wickets.

A more rounded batting performance followed against Zimbabwe, where Harry Dixon’s 89 guided them to a strong total before Harkirat Bajwa’s 4/15 dismantled the chase. The final group clash against Sri Lanka saw a classy 77* from Ryan Hicks rescue the side after Australia’s top-order fell by the wayside at the start of the second Powerplay.

In their first Super Six game against England, the Australia top-order was once again among the runs, with Weibgen’s vibrant ton leading the charge. Their bowlers then pressed the advantage of scoreboard pressure in a rain-affected encounter and secured a massive win.

However, the batting slipped up once more against a charged-up West Indies in their final Super Six encounter yet a splendid century from Sam Konstas helped them to post a competitive total of 227/8. With Charlie Anderson’s early breakthroughs, the contest had all the makings of a thriller, but rain intervention meant the game ended without a result. Their undefeated run ensured that they topped Group 2 of the Super Six, and entered the semi-finals.

Pakistan

Form guide (in the tournament): W W W W W
Pakistan were placed in Group D along with Afghanistan, Nepal, and New Zealand.

The group games were relatively smooth sailing for Saad Baig’s team. Shahzaib Khan’s 106 set the tone for a substantial total against Afghanistan, even as Saad contributed with an attacking fifty. Pacers Ubaid Shah and Mohammad Zeeshan were relentless as Pakistan won the game by 181 runs.

A valiant effort from Nepal challenged them in their second game. Nepal batted out their 50 overs, before having Pakistan in a spot of bother at 104/4. A patient 63 from Azan Awais then pulled Pakistan through to victory in East London.

But Pakistan were back to their very best in the final group encounter against the Kiwis. Ubaid’s scintillating opening spell saw the back of the top order before Arafat Minhas ran through the tail with his three-wicket haul. An attacking 80* from Shahzaib won Pakistan the game by 10 wickets.

In the Super Six phase, after bowling out Ireland for a modest 181, Pakistan's batting was tested.

Ahmad Hassan’s 57* pulled them out of trouble this time, guiding them to a three-wicket win.

A net run rate tussle brewed up in their final Super Six encounter against Bangladesh.

Despite a sturdy start for Pakistan, Sheikh Jibon and Rohanat Doullah Borson bowled exceptionally well to clean up their subcontinental rivals for 155.

It took Ubaid’s 5/44 backed by some exceptional fielding to see Pakistan home by a five run margin in a low-scoring thriller. With eight points in their kitty, they finished second in Group 1, sitting behind India on the basis of run rate.

Players to watch out for

Australia’s skipper Hugh Weibgen has also been their anchor in the tournament. He began the tournament with a brisk 39* from 43, which helped close out a risky chase against Namibia.

A solid 68 from 69 balls assisted Harry Dixon in the second game versus Zimbabwe. He failed to get going in the third game but opened the Super Six with a stroke-filled 120 against England. He hit 15 fours in a knock that saw him bat for over three hours. This hundred laid the foundation for a massive Australian win.

Besides impessing with the bat, Weibgen has been an active captain on the field. He has been smart with his bowling changes and overall leadership.

Shahzaib Khan’s rock-solid presence at the top is a big plus for a mercurial Pakistan batting lineup. He was the Player of the Match in two of their group encounters, contributing with a hundred against Afghanistan, and an unbeaten half-century against New Zealand.

The southpaw also ensured stable starts for Pakistan in low-scoring chases against Nepal and Bangladesh respectively.

Given the recent troubles of the middle-order batters, Shahzaib’s innings at the top will be an important factor for Pakistan in the semi-final against a quality attack.

Callum Vidler’s pinpoint accuracy, pace and movement have seen him stand out for Australia. Despite missing a game and hardly bowling in the rain-affected encounter against West Indies, the bowler already has 11 wickets to his name.

Eight of these wickets came in the form of match-winning four-wicket hauls against Namibia and England.

Along with Mahli Beardman and Charlie Anderson, Vidler can give Australia the early advantage on 6 February in Benoni.

The younger brother of Naseem Shah, Ubaid Shah stands joint second in the wicket-taking charts at the U19 Men’s CWC 2024, sitting behind South Africa speedster Kwena Maphaka.

Beginning with a 4/26 against Afghanistan, the pacer hasn’t looked back. His skillful display with both the new and old ball has meant that the bowler has made an impact in all stages of the game and helped Pakistan come back into matches at crucial junctures.

This came to the fore against Bangladesh when Ubaid overcame the ignominy of having dropped a catch to pick the crucial wicket of Mohammad Shihab James in the very next over, changing the momentum of the match and helping Pakistan secure a famous win.

Predicted XI

Australia: Harry Dixon, Sam Konstas, Hugh Weibgen (c), Harjas Singh, Ryan Hicks (wk), Tom Campbell, Raf MacMillan, Harkirat Bajwa, Charlie Anderson, Mahli Beardman, Callum Vidler

Pakistan: Shamyl Hussain, Shahzaib Khan, Azan Awais, Saad Baig (c) (wk), Ahmad Hassan, Haroon Arshad, Arafat Minhas, Ali Asfand, Ubaid Shah, Mohammad Zeeshan, Ali Raza
 
View attachment 142035

Australia and Pakistan both three-time champions, are set to clash in the thrilling second semi-final of the ICC U-19 Cricket World Cup on Thursday, February 8th, at Willowmoore Park in Benoni.

Pakistan remains unbeaten in the tournament, securing victories in all their group stage matches against Afghanistan, Nepal, and New Zealand. Under the leadership of Saad Baig, they continued their winning streak in the Super Six stages by defeating Ireland and Bangladesh, the latter being a tense encounter that saw the Boys in Green emerge victorious by a margin of five runs.

On the other hand, Australia topped their group with a perfect record, securing wins against Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe, and Namibia. In the Super Six stages, they overcame rivals England by 110 runs through the DLS method and earned a spot in the semi-finals, aided by a no-result outcome against West Indies. The stage is set for an intense battle between these cricketing powerhouses.


When: February 08, 1:00 PM PST

Where: Willowmoore Park, Benoni


Squads:

Australia U19 Squad: Lachlan Aitken, Harkirat Bajwa, Charlie Anderson, Mahli Beardman, Tom Campbell, Harry Dixon, Ryan Hicks, Sam Konstas, Rafael MacMillan, Aidan O’Connor, Harjas Singh, Tom Straker, Callum Vidler, Corey Wasley, Hugh Weibgen(c)

Pakistan U19 Squad: Shamyl Hussain, Shahzaib Khan, Azan Awais, Saad Baig(w/c), Haroon Arshad, Arafat Minhas, Ubaid Shah, Mohammad Zeeshan, Ahmad Hassan, Ali Asfand, Naveed Ahmed Khan, Ali Raza, Amir Hassan, Khubaib Khalil, Mohammad Riazullah


==

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Watching only for Zeeshan and ubaid


These 2 have unreal potential to be our top pacers in odi and t20.

Zeeshan may come good in tests but depends on his motivation factor.
 
The weight of history is particularly heavy when you represent Pakistan.

There are always callbacks to the Cornered Tigers of ‘92 or the pace-bowling traditions of Wasim and Waqar, and in the case of the junior side in the ongoing ICC U19 Men’s Cricket World Cup 2024, the back-to-back title triumphs in 2004 and 2006.

It’s nearly two decades since Pakistan enjoyed success at this event. They came close in 2010 and 2014, reaching the finals both times, but the trophy still eludes them, even though superstars of the calibre of Babar Azam and Shaheen Shah Afridi emerged through the ranks.

Shahzaib Khan is of course hoping to one day follow in the steps of those two, but his immediate aspirations are simple: "I can't put into words the feeling of possibly winning the World Cup,” he tells ICC. “For the country and the team, the feeling will be unparalleled if we end up winning.”

Shahzaib has so far done his bit to that end – with an impressive tally of 260 runs in five matches, he sits proudly among the tournament's top run-scorers.

A high-stakes semi-final clash against Australia awaits on Thursday. With higher stakes comes more pressure, and add to it the weight of history that comes with representing Pakistan, there will likely be nerves.But Shahzaib isn’t fazed.

“We don't take any pressure, we are playing our natural game,” he says.

“We place equal importance on every match. We are putting our efforts into becoming champions this time around.”

That confidence is well founded. Pakistan's record so far is unblemished, with the team going unbeaten in five matches to make it to the semi-finals. That said, it’s not been without challenges – their fortitude was put to the test in their last Super Six game against Bangladesh, a virtual quarter-final for both sides.

After being bowled out for 155, Pakistan were up against it. However, they showcased resilience with an inspired bowling performance and successfully defended the total, ultimately securing a thrilling victory by five runs.

“There was a bit of nerves when Bangladesh were chasing,” Shazaib admits. “It was a do-or-die match, a virtual knockout. We didn't have many runs on board, but we knew that the wicket was difficult to bat on and that it would be challenging for Bangladesh to score those runs."

“We wanted to get early wickets and make the chase difficult for them. The pitch was such that it would have been difficult to score the runs despite it being a low score.

“It was a tough match but I feel this was our best performance among the five matches.”
The unity the team displayed during that backs-to-the-wall performance was something Shahzaib speaks of proudly.

“If you see our last game when the batting didn't click, the bowlers put their hands up,” he says. “When the bowlers have an off day, the batters pull the team up.

“It's a combination of these things that has led to our success. We play as a unit and we hope to continue doing so in the semi-final.”

Even if they don’t make it past the semi-finals, representing Pakistan has already been a dream come true for Shahzaib. The journey began in 2018, in the serene landscapes of Mansehra at the Junaid Khan Cricket Academy.

By the end of that year, Shahzaib had not only embraced the game but also made swift progress, playing in the U13 category and later transitioning to U16 with Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

“When I started playing cricket, I wasn't very aware of age-group cricket like U19 and U16 or much about the game,” he says.

“But I was always determined to play for Pakistan – I didn't know how but that was always the goal.

“Once I began (my journey) in 2018, I started to realise that I wanted to become a cricketer. But it was always in my mind that I wanted to represent the country.”

Shahzaib being left-handed, his cricketing idol comes as no surprise – the legendary Pakistani opener Saeed Anwar, who Shahzaib reveals was a big inspiration in how he shaped his approach to the game. Sri Lanka legend Kumar Sangakkara is another name-check when listing his inspirations.

Shahzaib’s rise has been rapid since he joined the age-group ranks, but it’s not all been smooth sailing. He was called up to the Pakistan U19 squad for the home series against Bangladesh in November 2022, but he struggled, scoring just 16 runs in three one-day games. “When I played against Bangladesh in Pakistan, I didn't perform well."

However Shahzaib's resilience came to the fore on the return tour in May 2023. He found his rhythm and scored an impressive 174 in the first four-day match, and soon clinched the Player of the Series title in both the four-day and one-day formats.

Looking back, Shahzaib identifies this tour as the “turning point” in his career. “After that, I have played very well and have been part of all the series, including the Asia Cup and the World Cup,” he says.

There has been no turning back and his performances in the World Cup thus far are testament to his commitment to self-improvement.

For Shahzaib, the U19 Men’s CWC is the pinnacle for a young cricketer, a stage where dreams take flight. The importance of this esteemed event was heightened for Shahzaib when he marked his World Cup debut with a century against Afghanistan in the opener.

“It was a great feeling,” he says. “For a U19 player, there is no bigger event than the U19 World Cup. And for someone to score a hundred on their World Cup debut is a great honour. I was elated to score the century.

“I am happy with my performance in the five matches so far. But I will try to do better and score another hundred in the semi-final to help my team reach the final.”

When asked about his hopes beyond this tournament, Shahzaib Khan displayed that unwavering clarity yet again.

"I want to perform to the best of my ability,” he says. “My dream is to play all three formats for the Pakistan senior team and have a long career.”

That weight of history sits lightly on young shoulders.

ICC
 
Should be good contest I expect Australia to attack Pakistani batters and not let them settle.
 
Australia will take advantage of our batters' habit of succumbing to pressure.
 
I'm expecting an easy win for Australia. But hopefully our boys can atleast put up a fight.
 
Not sure why Aus under 19 kids are being rated so much. At the end of the day they are still immature. I see Pakistan’s chances at 50% still.
 
pitch will most probably be the same like the earlier ones. No big deal about the pitches in this U19 world cup.
So far I have seen 3 type of pitches , the one with extra bounce and seam movement through out the day , the one with seam movement in the morning only but extra bounce through out the day , the one when there is swing and seam with extra pace but gets batter as the day progresses.

So which we are getting today?
 
So far I have seen 3 type of pitches , the one with extra bounce and seam movement through out the day , the one with seam movement in the morning only but extra bounce through out the day , the one when there is swing and seam with extra pace but gets batter as the day progresses.

So which we are getting today?
Not sure about it atm.we will know for sure when the time is near.
 
If we win today , hopefully we get a morning only bowling pitch in the final (very much like we got against NZ) and let India bat first , surely the worldcup will be ours.
 
I'm expecting an easy win for Australia. But hopefully our boys can atleast put up a fight.
Why are you expecting an easy win for Australia? Never understood this negative mentality of Pakistani fans. Pakistan have a good allround team, the conditions against BD were tough. India dominated SA in the tri-series prior to WC but almost lost in the semis against same team, so in a knockout match anything can happen. In sha Allah Pakistan will make it through to the finals. Yeh 'darr' apne dimagh se nikal dou. :)
 
Toss Update:

Australia U19 have won the toss and have opted to field
 
I don't care about the result of this match. Results don't matter much at junior level.
It's more about talent at this level.
 
Toss Update:

Australia U19 have won the toss and have opted to field
9ZvA0T8.png


TEAMS:

Pakistan Under-19 (Playing XI)
- Shahzaib Khan, Shamyl Hussain, Azan Awais, Saad Baig (C/WK), Ahmad Hassan, Haroon Arshad, Arafat Minhas, Ubaid Shah, Mohammad Zeeshan, Ali Raza, Naveed Khan.

Australia Under-19 (Playing XI) - Sam Konstas, Harry Dixon, Hugh Weibgen (C), Harjas Singh, Ryan Hicks (WK), Ollie Peake, Tom Campbell, Rafael Macmillan, Tom Straker, Mahli Beardman, Callum Vidler.
 
Last edited:
Should have gone for Riazullah and make our batting strong. Naveed is a good change never the less.
 
Guess what one Parchi must be in the playing XI , Haroon did nothing in the U19 3-day and 1-day competition and did nothing in the PJL as well and did nothing in the SL U19 series , did nothing in the worldcup , yet he is playing the all important semi final, RIP merit.
 
Batting is too thin i am afraid..atleast ali afsand could bat ..why does haroon Arshad keep getting picked
 
As I said earlier , you don't win worldcup by playing with 9/9.5 players , atleast we have 10 today so there is hope lol.
 
Lol these batsmen are from misbah's school ot batting.

Not a single exciting batsman in this lineup.
 
This Callum vilder is seriously fast. Fastest pacer for sure in the tournament
 
Australia have a made a poor decision at the toss. Its a fairly dry surface
 
This guy shahzaib is not doing anybody a favour here by playing a sluggish inning here. He needs to work on his strike rate.
 
Good shot for 4 off vidler's bowling. Shamyl helps it on its way.
 
Another free-flowing cover drive by Shamyl to end the over. Good start this is by the U19 boys.
 
This shahzaib guy is not looking good. Hope he settles and makes up for this sluggish start.
 
Same lack of sense and preparation by every pakistani batsman , don't feel in control against the short ball
 
Stupid shot after so much hard work
 
Shamyl is gone. Shahzaib is the reason here for this wicket. His turtle-like scoring rate has put pressure on him to go wild and he lost his wicket in the process.
 
System batting- wise is rotten bottom to the top.

Same pathetic tuk tuk nonsense in U19 too. That means same is being taught at grassroots level.

Whole system needs an upheaval.
 
Misbah really has destroyed Pakistan cricket.
Misbah is the sole destroyer of Pakistan cricket.
 
I was thinking someone needs to talk to Shahzaib because he was looking very nervous out there, and now he is gone
 
And now Shahzaib is also gone..this guy is overrated and is of no use.
 
Shahzaib wow, that was tail enderish at the end. Just backing away looking scared.
 
System batting- wise is rotten bottom to the top.

Same pathetic tuk tuk nonsense in U19 too. That means same is being taught at grassroots level.

Whole system needs an upheaval.
Also had to do with instructions from the dressing room. Yousuf Junaid also share the blame for this timid approach
 
This Shezaib is such selfish and useless batsman. Hopefully this will end the curtain of his cricket career.
 
Shahzaib wow, that was tail enderish at the end. Just backing away looking scared.
Humiliating really. Bowler gestured to him I'll hit you on your head and had him caught at point the next ball with Shahzaib backing away
 
Humiliating really. Bowler gestured to him I'll hit you on your head and had him caught at point the next ball with Shahzaib backing away
Shahzaib's backfoot was moving away from the ball . Thats truly schoolboyish
 
it's a blessing that shahzaib is out. now our innings can begin
 
Potential collapse is looming, these timids struggle under pressure. No new talent seems to be emerging.
 
As an Indian , I am rooting for Pakistan in the hope of seeing an India vs Pak final . But seems like that is not going to happen
 
Also had to do with instructions from the dressing room. Yousuf Junaid also share the blame for this timid approach
india was able to invest in bringing foreign pace coaches like Dennis Lillee to their mega academies like MRF pace academy which slowly from late 90s to 2000s produced results 15-20 years later.

We on the other hand keep appointing local paindu dehatis who teach wrong technical aspects as well as mentality and mindset like this encouraging timidness and inept batting technique.
 
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